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#1 of 27 Old 01-08-2007, 02:08 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ds is 4, understands letter sounds, reads a few small words, is very interested in reading. Those of you with readers, how did they learn to read????? Did you teach them or did they just figure it out? What abt all the rules of phonics?? Thanks, Michelle

, mama to DS(7/)22/02) DS (8/14/04) , and an angel (3/10/10)nursing a broken heart...loving my boys.
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#2 of 27 Old 01-08-2007, 03:51 PM
 
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This is timely for us, as my 5 year old started reading last week. He knew all the letter sounds before 2, had many sight words at 2 and could sound out cvc words at 3 BUT it just never clicked for him. His ability to sound out at 3 was word to word (and slooooow); he didn't really make big picture inferences. He did not progress from that limited point. Then at 4, he developed a big interest in learning to read but again, it just didn't click for him. He lost interest rather quickly. We reassured him that learning to read was a process and that he *was* learning to read, that we all had to learn to do it at one point in time, etc. He went on his happy way.

I don't know what happened, but it's like something clicked for him last weekend. He showed some interest in sounding out a few words in a book dh read him. It was very tedious, like "kuh - ah -tuh...kuh-ah-tuh, kuhahtuh, caaaaatttt, caaatt, cat". Last night, one week later, he read, "This was not the train." with very little deliberation. He's reading Bob books that he's never seen before, just based on his budding understanding of phonics. At an earlier age, he was unable to make the big picture connections. Now, he's on fire with reading. I was struggling with how to explain some of the MANY English phonics violations (like "ball" sounding like "on" rather than "cat"). You know, all that stuff about the short vowel sounds is just not true all the time. But, he's just taken it all in stride and is moving on. I've had to do very little in guiding him. He wasn't ready before and now he just is. He is doing most of the work, not me. I'm just there to help him when he's stuck and explain a couple of little things (e.g. I explained "-ing" this morning).

All kids are ready at different ages. What I have learned from my one limited experience is this: Kids may express a strong interest in learning to read before they are able to put it all together. There can be a long gap between the point where a kid shows some basic pre-reading skills to the point where that kid is actually ready to take the next step. Kids often need to be reassured that they *are* learning to read, because it starts from the first time they can tell a letter from a scribble. Perfectionism can really be wrapped up in the whole deal and we may have to reassure our kids that they don't need to do it all now. There is no rush. Kids who read later do not necessarily read less fluently as adults.

I'm sure it looks different for everyone. But from my perspective, I'm noticing that I have to do very little work. He's taking off with it and I just have to guide or insert short explanations. He wasn't ready before this point. I had these Bob books and in the past, I couldn't figure out how to use them. Now that he's developmentally ready to do it, I don't have to worry about how to use them because my son is the one using them with just a few comments from me.

All kids are different. She may or may not be developmentally ready to take the next steps. And if she's not ready, at least you won't have to worry about her reading obscene grafitti and scary news headlines (that happened to my sister!).
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#3 of 27 Old 01-09-2007, 10:55 PM
 
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My DH has been reading Read! Right! based on a recommendation here and it gives TONS of tips on how to read to your child in a way that will *teach* them reading skills without it coming across as teaching. There are also lots of little games, tips, etc. And it's all without her knowing we're doing anything other than reading. I haven't read it yet, since I was busy reading "Hold On To Your Kids" but I need to read that next! We've definitely noticed an improvement in her learning, and it gives us a different perspective on what types of books to choose, how to read, etc.

ETA: This book apparently doesn't want us to place emphasis on phonics. Rather, it's a focus on how an adult might read - we make a lot of assumptions and we don't read letter by letter. I really need to read it! Anyway, based on that, he said he didn't want me buying Zoo Phonics (someone else locally had recommended it)!
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#4 of 27 Old 01-09-2007, 11:59 PM
 
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I just wanted to say that my DS just turned five as well and has known his phonics for over a year (I'm a big believer in phonetic reading). We started Hooked on Phonics (my mother got it for DS as a Christmas present) and so far I am very impressed with the program. DS 1 is REALLY responding well in a way he never responded to other books or the Leap Frog Videos. He's already reading and is very proud (we started on January 3rd.) You can get the box set used or buy it at Walmart's website. I was very skeptical but it has been exactly what we needed.
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#5 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 12:35 AM
 
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My dd1 will be 5 in a few months and she is a strong reader (she reads novels independently). She, like LeftField's ds knew all of the letters and sounds before 2 and read a lot of environmental print (stop signs, business signs, etc) at 2. I had no intention of teaching her these things so early, but she was obsessed. I just answered her questions. She spent the time between 2 and 3 memorizing all of her books and reciting them while jumping up and down and flapping her arms (she also muttered her own weird incantations ).

Then, right after she turned 3, I was reading a brand new magazine with her when, as I was pausing to take a breath, she just kept going. Apparently, she had been reading for a while and neglected to mention it. About 3.5, she asked me why dolphin wasn't spelled dolfin (she could read the word, she just thought the spelling was odd) and we had a little phonics talk.

For her, learning to read was really a very personal process and I was only peripherally involved. I read to her whenever she asked (well, I did occasionally insist on a bathroom break) and answered her questions.

I totally agree with LeftField when she says that, "Kids often need to be reassured that they *are* learning to read, because it starts from the first time they can tell a letter from a scribble." It is a process that, I believe, many kids can complete in their own ways and in their own time. If you are reading with your ds and answering his questions, he will most likely take care of the rest. That said, there is absolutely nothing wrong with offering Starfall or HOP or whatever if he shows an interest. They are valuable resources.
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#6 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 10:50 AM
 
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My son just learned to read. Mostly, he did it himself by talking endlessly about letters, street signs, billboards . . . then words in books. We've covered a few basic phonics, I read alot to him . . . but mostly, it all came down to him, and what clicked in his brain.

John Holt write that babies learn to walk and talk on their own. We don't teach them. And learning to read is the same. I read that before my oldest was a reader, and it was hard to believe. But, I was amazed to see that basically, that's true. I could be a guide to answer questions or read stories, but really, the learning was going on in his brain. I'm still impressed by the way that works!
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#7 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 03:12 PM
 
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there is a book, teach your child to read in 100 lessons, there are also worksheets online


one love

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#8 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 03:14 PM
 
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"John Holt write that babies learn to walk and talk on their own. We don't teach them. And learning to read is the same. I read that before my oldest was a reader, and it was hard to believe. But, I was amazed to see that basically, that's true. I could be a guide to answer questions or read stories, but really, the learning was going on in his brain. I'm still impressed by the way that works!"

white_feather, you said what I meant far more simply and clearly.:
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#9 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 03:48 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks everyone for all your great replies! Michelle

, mama to DS(7/)22/02) DS (8/14/04) , and an angel (3/10/10)nursing a broken heart...loving my boys.
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#10 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 04:08 PM
 
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My son is 4 also. He knows the letter sounds as they sound out classmates names on the name tags in preschool. If he doesn't know the sounds that may be a good place to start when you read to dc. I was reading to my ds last night and one page had the word SAD in big letters. I asked him to sound it out and he did! He was so proud of himself
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#11 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 07:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LeftField View Post
He knew all the letter sounds before 2, had many sight words at 2 and could sound out cvc words at 3

My dd is 3 and I will be posting a separate thread about what I am supposed to be doing at this age, but did you do anything specifically to have your ds sounding out letters at age 2?

Narnia, mother of Anorien (10/03) and Ford (5/07)
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#12 of 27 Old 01-10-2007, 07:39 PM
 
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We used "The Reading Lesson". Love it. www.readinglesson.com
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#13 of 27 Old 01-11-2007, 01:19 AM
 
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AnoriensMom, I'm not LeftField, but I thought I'd jump in anyway.:

My dd learned all of the letters and sounds at 18 months because she was obsessed. Being read to was her very favorite activity and whenever we read, she would point to letters and say, "what's that?" until she knew them all. Then, she moved on to, "what sound does it make?" I answered because it clearly was important to her. I did not intend to teach her that young, she insisted.

My younger dd is now two and a half and I think that she only knows a few letters. She just has different interests: building things, singing, trying to stand on her head... She has no real need to know letters and phonics at this point in her development.

Honestly, if you are an involved parent, and I'm sure you are, and you have books in your home, your dd will learn when it is right for her.

Jumping off soapbox now.:
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#14 of 27 Old 01-11-2007, 10:22 AM
 
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Originally Posted by TEAK's Mom View Post
AnoriensMom, I'm not LeftField, but I thought I'd jump in anyway.:

My dd learned all of the letters and sounds at 18 months because she was obsessed. Being read to was her very favorite activity and whenever we read, she would point to letters and say, "what's that?" until she knew them all. Then, she moved on to, "what sound does it make?" I answered because it clearly was important to her. I did not intend to teach her that young, she insisted.

My younger dd is now two and a half and I think that she only knows a few letters. She just has different interests: building things, singing, trying to stand on her head... She has no real need to know letters and phonics at this point in her development.

Honestly, if you are an involved parent, and I'm sure you are, and you have books in your home, your dd will learn when it is right for her.

Jumping off soapbox now.:
Great post.

I didn't do anything to have him sounding things out at that age. We were reading a new book one night and I stopped short of saying the word and he said it. I was surprised so then I quizzed him on a few other cvc words. : But he wasn't really interested in it, so I let it go. Like TeakMom's said, he was obsessed with letters at 1, really obsessed. My youngest son never did anything like that; he could care less. And that's fine too. But, you see, the skills he displayed didn't hurry the learning-to-read process for him. He's learning at 5 now, which is not an unusual age. So, while it was fun for him, he stopped there.

For some kids, it's on their developmental time-table to read early. For other kids, it's not. But it doesn't mean the latter will not read as well as the first group. And it doesn't mean, IMHO, that early reading instruction would change the long-term fluency of the second group. If I could go back in time and change anything, I would not change my son to be a reader at 3. There's nothing wrong with it, of course, but I wouldn't change it to be that way if I could. 5 is fine with me.

I know you didn't ask for advice but since you asked what I did to get him to sound out the words, I will offer my two cents. I think the most important thing you can do for a 3 year old wrt reading, besides nurturing a love of reading, is building comprehension. Decoding is only one step of learning to read. My MIL is a teacher asst and she says that they sometimes see children who can decode nearly anything but have very limited comprehension of what they've just read. You can't go wrong in boosting comprehension. Once your child starts reading, I would imagine it would be a big advantage and a confidence booster. I read a wide variety of things to my kids, ask them questions about what they think is going on, ask them what they think will happen, define new words, etc. Sometimes we just read to read, of course. But when they seem interested, we talk about these things. A really great book is "The Read-Aloud Handbook" by Jim Trelease. HTH!
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#15 of 27 Old 01-11-2007, 10:26 AM
 
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I highly recommend 100 EZ lessons. Highly, highly, highly recommend it.
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#16 of 27 Old 01-11-2007, 12:57 PM - Thread Starter
 
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thanks everyone! I ordered 100 easy lessons. You guys are so full of great ideas

, mama to DS(7/)22/02) DS (8/14/04) , and an angel (3/10/10)nursing a broken heart...loving my boys.
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#17 of 27 Old 01-11-2007, 07:13 PM
 
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Thanks for your "two cents"!!
I am usually just floating around in my "I'm an awsome mom" reverie
and then every once in a while I wake up and think omg am I supposed to being doing something that I am not.
Yes, I do read to her everyday and she is a whiz at comprehension. She is also very busy doing other things, drawing, singing, acting dramatic.

I will look into these books mentioned, thanks.

Narnia, mother of Anorien (10/03) and Ford (5/07)
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#18 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 12:52 AM
 
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AnoriensMom, boy do I know about those moments. I'm learning to relax since they tend to lead me to do some really silly things. I bet you are more sensible about it than I am.
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#19 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 08:23 AM
 
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We've used 100 Easy Lessons sometimes, but there are some misleading phonics. For example, in Lesson 4 (if it has remained the same in all editions), they indicate that the letter "a" in the combinations "ma" and "sa" should should have a short "a" sound. (This is, presumably, to get children ready to read "mat," etc.) In English, most open syllables (syllables that end with a vowel) have a long vowel, such as so, go, me--or even the first syllable in words such as "digress." It's much less confusing to children to be introduced to word endings--"-at," "-an," etc.--and then add different consonants to the beginning. Of course, it was easy to skip the faulty phonics lessons and go onto the next. And this reading program is not the only one that has faulty phonics. (We really just used 100 Easy for the progressive reading passages, anyway; our kids were bored with the lessons.)


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thanks everyone! I ordered 100 easy lessons. You guys are so full of great ideas
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#20 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 04:40 PM
 
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We are using http://www.headsprout.com/. My dd is 6 and I have a 3 yr old and a 6 month old. I was looking for something to help when I had a brand new baby and very little chance to give one-on-one to my 6 yr old. She is whizzing thru it and loves it. She has gone from a total non reader last summer to currently reading sentences such as "I sweep the sand and I sweep the sand. I wish the sand would vanish!" The episodes are about 20 minutes long and we have worked thru them in a haphazard manner, sometimes each day, sometimes forgetting about it for a few weeks. I am also using another set of readers as well as the readers that are part of Headsprout to make sure she is seeing words and sounds in other contexts.

I don't have time right now for much read aloud with the children, but my 6 yr old loves to listen to books on CD such as the Little House series, One of a Kind Family, Paddington Bear and Roald Dahl books. I know learning the sounds in words is as much auditory as visual.
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#21 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 04:52 PM
 
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Fiona was just reading one day. LOL She was about 4 I think. I asked her how she learned and this is what she told me: "Remember the Little Bear books you read to me? One day I thought I can do that! and I did!" LOL
Eric has just started sounding out simple words. As Fiona learned phonics at school, he picked up on some of it. Also he remembers some words. He is 5. I'm just going to make it a priority to read to him more often and hope he catches on like Fiona did. If not, I'll teach more only if he asks for it.

Leigh

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#22 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 04:52 PM
 
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Headsprout is about $150 for 80 lessons online, adjusted to your child and incudes books, flashcards and progress reports. Many people like http://www.starfall.com/ which is FREE.
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#23 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 05:41 PM
 
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We have been using 100 easy lessons as well, DD has been asking to learn to read for sometime, so we are finally letting her, she'll be 4 in April, we're on lesson 6 or so .
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#24 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 06:41 PM
 
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John Holt write that babies learn to walk and talk on their own. We don't teach them. And learning to read is the same. I read that before my oldest was a reader, and it was hard to believe. But, I was amazed to see that basically, that's true. I could be a guide to answer questions or read stories, but really, the learning was going on in his brain. I'm still impressed by the way that works!
If that was true, wouldn't EVERYONE learn how to read by osmosis eventually?

As long as a person is not physically handicapped most learn how to walk and talk, but looking at the worldwide literacy rates is more than clear that not everybody who can walk and talk can read, it's not even close.

So what's wrong with the masses of adults who can walk and talk, but can't read?
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#25 of 27 Old 01-12-2007, 07:54 PM
 
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If that was true, wouldn't EVERYONE learn how to read by osmosis eventually?

As long as a person is not physically handicapped most learn how to walk and talk, but looking at the worldwide literacy rates is more than clear that not everybody who can walk and talk can read, it's not even close.

So what's wrong with the masses of adults who can walk and talk, but can't read?
Well, there's a bit more to it than that, obviously. But, the idea is sound. What Holt meant was that, assuming no stumbling blocks (such as eye problems or certain learning disabilities), children who are surrounded by the written word, who are read to regularly, and who see those around them reading for information and pleasure are almost certainly going to pick up reading skills in the same way that they learned to walk and talk. I haven't met any homeschooling families that don't fit this description.

It's a big leap of faith, and many children won't learn to read on the schools' timetable (around age 6 or 7), but there are quite a few people who have found that, yes, children will learn to read on their own. Some will do it behind closed doors, and one day, almost mysteriously, will be able to read. Others will ask for help from those around them. It depends on the child.

Many parents, however, feel more comfortable teaching their children to read. Reading is one of those skills by which others judge our ability to homeschool. It's also one of those skills (like walking) that parents use to compare their children ("Little Johnny's reading at a 3rd grade level!"). And, it's a basis for a lot of what we've grown up thinking of as "learning."

Also, if a family is homeschooling with a curriculum, late (or even early) reading can cause problems.

But, for those who aren't following a curriculum and aren't gaging their children's progress using timetables (reading at age six, cursive at age 8, etc.), allowing a child to learn to read and in her/his own way in her/his own time can have wonderful benefits, perhaps the greatest of which is that reading is never seen as a chore, and many (if not most) children who learn to read in this way develop a deep love for the written word.
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#26 of 27 Old 01-13-2007, 09:51 AM
 
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I am usually just floating around in my "I'm an awsome mom" reverie and then every once in a while I wake up and think omg am I supposed to be doing
that made me LOL! i think i fall into this category, too....hence, the reason this is my first time in this area of MDC.

great thread & i've gotten a lot of inspiration. can i ask a spinoff question? wait...maybe i'll just start to a new thread as to not highjack....

stephanie asl.gif

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#27 of 27 Old 01-13-2007, 10:28 AM
 
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So what's wrong with the masses of adults who can walk and talk, but can't read?
Folkypoet said it very well already but I will answer too.

What's wrong with them, IMHO, is that they didn't grow up in a print-rich environment. It's hard to figure reading out on your own if you have very limited exposure to books and no one reads to you regularly. Also, if the important adults in your life don't love reading or they do it infrequently, then perhaps there is also an indirect message sent to an impressionable child which is: reading isn't that important.
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