Which comes first reading or writing? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 12:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I have an almost (in 9 days!!) 6 year old, the curriculim we have been loosely following has had him working on writing his letters, but completly discourages reading at this age. But then I read an artical the other day and it said that reading should come first. It sort of made more sence to me. So my Q is, did your child read or write first? I guess if they read first they may understand what they are writing. Hmmmm, there may be winds of change blowing! Oh I also read that it can be too much to work on reading and writing at the same time, what is your experience?? Thanks!!
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#2 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 12:24 PM
 
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She started writing a good 6 months before she attempted reading. She mirrors some of her letters and writes in caps only.
It makes more sense to me for a child to really know their letters. Once they know they easily recognize letters and know their sounds reading would logically not be far behind. That's how it's happened here anyhow. I admittedly haven't read anything about the proper order of reading and writing.
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#3 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 12:26 PM
 
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I think it probably varies from child to child. Sure, there are probably various child development "experts" who will say one thing or the other, but ultimately, who knows.

In my experience, my 6.5 year old son was very interested in forming letters, and loved dictating something to me for him to copy down. This was probably when he was around 4 1/2 years old or so. He loved to write notes to his dad and grandparents that way. He was also much better at sounding out how to spell a word than looking at a printed word and sounding it out. Eventually all the pieces came together beautifully, and now he's reading at a much more advanced level, but his writing and spelling is still probably right at age-level appropriateness.

Really, I'd just suggest that you try to follow your DS's lead, and if he's enthusiastic about writing and highly motivated to do it, it certainly can't hurt. If he'd rather read or be read to, I'd go that route. My guess is that every child will have their own perfect balance that will work best for them.
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#4 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 12:53 PM
 
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My daughter will be 5 in May and is reading a bit and likes to write words on post-it notes and stick them on everything in the house. For her, it's happening at the same time. I'm just along for the ride, at this point.
I'm guessing that it is different for each child. Just depends what "clicks" for them.
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#5 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 01:12 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dannashoooked View Post
So my Q is, did your child read or write first?
My daughter will be five this month. She started writing before she started reading.

My son will be 4 this month. He has started writing but he has not started reading.

My oldest child is 12. She came to us at age 11 from Ethiopia. She definitely started writing in English before she was reading.

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#6 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 02:16 PM
 
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I wonder if that depends on how you define reading and writing?

Ds 4 yo is sounding out simple phonetic words, but I don't consider that "reading" because he can't sit down and read a book, for example. Well, except for some of the Bob books. He also knows how to write half to 2/3 of his letters, and writes them everywhere, but isn't putting them together to write many words all on his own. I don't consider this "writing", either. But the writing that he does do, started before the reading. It was more like copying letters around him.

I guess I think of reading as sitting down and reading a book and understanding it, and writing as having a thought and writing it down completely on his own. So by that definition, ds isn't doing either one, but he is at the beginning stages of both.
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#7 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 03:37 PM
 
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I think this must vary from child to child, when the child is allowed to initiate.

My oldest wrote years before he read. Writing for him was: writing his name, copying words from books, writing sight words he knew and asking me to spell things for him so that he could write them. Reading just didn't click for him, even though he was highly interested in writing. My youngest wrote his name and pseudo words (random letters joined together), but he does not read.

I'm pretty sure that my niece read first and then writing followed for her. She wasn't instructed; it was just her natural progression.

I think it depends on the child and their learning style.
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#8 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 04:14 PM
 
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Writing can be very hard for a lot of little boys; and there's no reason why they should have to do it so young. Reading comes a lot easier to many children, and they lose nothing at all by learning to read first. I think the best rule of thumb is the child's own desire or lack of it - parents don't need to be making all those decisions for them. Lillian
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#9 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 04:21 PM
 
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My ds (3.5) has no interest in writing right now, but is super interested in reading and can sound out simple words. I think (like practically everything else) which one they do first depends on the child.
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#10 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 05:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks Mamas, I appreshiate all the diffrent experiences, I think I'll continue to not push but give him the writing exersizes, and maybe dabble in reading to see what he does. It is great to have so many mamas to ask!
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#11 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 05:58 PM
 
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My dd started reading long before she attempted writing. She has never been motivated to draw or color, or sit and do anything. She is definitely gross motor skills girl. She is 7, and can't write more than two simple sentences without her hand cramping up. We're working on this, but if she had waited to learn to read until after she could write, she would have missed out on the last 2 years or so of reading fun.
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#12 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 08:41 PM
 
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DD (8) taught herself to read at 5.5. At that time she was also teaching herself how to write some letters, but not many, and definatly not writing any words. So in dd's case, she learned to read before she was writing.

DSteen I think learned how to write before he read, but that was a school based thing, not child led learning.

S(4) has learned a few words and memorized some books, and is teaching himself how to write letters, and today he wrote the word "hook" without seeming to realize he wrote a word he was quite proud of himself when we told him he wrote the word "hook" and it was connected to his picture of a sword fight. :

In both dd's and ds4, they are being allowed to go at their pace and learn as they go. I didn't /am not trying to teach them to read/write, they are doing it as their on natural progress of learning and doing. I think every child may have their own way and timeframe.

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#13 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 09:54 PM
 
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My oldest two started writing first. They began to read around ages 5 1/2-6. I think as long as they can recognize letters that either one could come first.

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#14 of 17 Old 02-02-2007, 11:47 PM
 
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I have one of each.

My oldest started reading early and even now (he is 7) only writes when I make him copy a sentance or compose a narration.

My middle is 5 1/2 and can't read, not even reconizing letters, but writes and composes all day. He copies words and letters from everything, and makes up songs and poems for me to write and him to copy. He loves making birthday cards for everyone, something my oldest would find torture, but M. "gets to do"
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#15 of 17 Old 02-03-2007, 12:05 AM
 
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Dd learned to read first. I'm a bit confused by how someone could learn to write before learning to read. How would they know what to write?
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#16 of 17 Old 02-03-2007, 12:06 AM
 
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I think they are two different skills not necessarily dependant on each other.

Many children learn to read first then write.
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#17 of 17 Old 02-03-2007, 12:32 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brigianna View Post
Dd learned to read first. I'm a bit confused by how someone could learn to write before learning to read. How would they know what to write?
My oldest copied words from picture books and asked me to spell things for him. He even wrote notes, but he could not read the notes (I had to dictate letters). He did have few sight words that he could write but they were common sight words for little ones (e.g. zoo). But really, writing words was kind of like drawing for him. It even looked like a drawing. If he wrote "truck", he didn't know how those sounds worked in that context to apply it to a new word (e.g. duck). He didn't make that logical connection until almost two years later.

When I think about the variables involved that made him favor writing over reading, I think of his visual-spatial learning style, fine motor development and a knack for drawing. My niece read before she wrote and she just has a completely different learning style and personality.
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