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#1 of 21 Old 07-23-2007, 06:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My son was recently diagnosed with APD and Sensory Processing Disorder this summer and I am looking for mamas with experience with this either themself or their child/ren. We have soooooo struggled with the school system for four years including 2 of those years in Kindergarden and now we are going to homeschool for the 1 st year this year. I would love any help as to what would work best and or suggestions for 3rd grade work/lessons or curriculum. Suggestions? Or just your daily routine what works best for your child who struggles with APD?
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#2 of 21 Old 07-24-2007, 10:00 AM - Thread Starter
 
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#3 of 21 Old 07-24-2007, 09:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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#4 of 21 Old 07-26-2007, 02:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
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#5 of 21 Old 07-26-2007, 12:48 PM
 
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My son has Asperger's, and with that comes SPD and also some APD. My son needs a lot of structure, so we went with the Calvert school this year. I think next year, I'll purchase my own textbooks and make up my own lesson plans, but this year Calvert is great for us since I didn't know what I was doing.

I don't know your son, so I don't know if a structured program like Calvert would be best for him. It is a lot of written work. I don't require nearly the amount of writing that they call for b/c my son hates writing and physically can't do it for long (working w/ his OT on that.) Something more unstructured may work for you guys, but I tried it last year and we had meltdowns daily. My son needs a schedule and to stick to his schedule. We take a lot of breaks. And if he needs to take 2 days to go through 1 days' lesson plan, we do that.

btw, my son is in 3rd grade this year. In public school, they had him repeat 1st grade, but we decided to skip 2nd.
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#6 of 21 Old 07-26-2007, 01:18 PM
 
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Where I live there's a yahoogroup for homeschoolers with SN kids. Is there something like that where you live. My dd1 has trouble hearing with some possibility of APD. But we've been really slack about following up as we figured it out because we worked out ways for her to learn what she is interested in.

I'd love to know more about what kinds of therapy has helped your dc.

Have you tried Orton-Gillingham? http://www.orton-gillingham.com/

We got a CD at the homeschool consignment store that gots us started on the multi-sensorial track. It was really helpful.

Also the Mel Levine "All kinds of minds" has helped some folks I know.
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#7 of 21 Old 07-26-2007, 10:49 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wendy-- I am wondering now since our child is both APD and Spd how does one know about the Asperger's? Did they diag. firtst the APD and Spd then Asperger's or what. So far they have not asked me to take him to any further testing and says those are the two problems. We are working more on the apd this summer with games such as Simon. He loves it and does know we are working on his APD. We play around with the wrap ups for division. I would like to get some for addition and subtraction and will probably do that soon because division other than the 1, and 2's is a little difficult and if he had some that are easier it would be more enjoyable to him. Plus we can pass those learning toys down to little brothers and sis! I don't think structure is going to do to good in our home due to twins who are 6 months and a four year old! , but I am just trying to get him to enjoy learning right now. We don't do to much due to it's summer and I am trying to unschool him because school has really made him hate it!!! So we are taking slow baby steps to learning. If he thinks it's worksheets to learn he will immediately say nope! So we are tip toeing to find books that interest him because reading is a weak spot too so it is a slow go right now.

Chfriend-- I was told by the hearing and speech dr to get the earobics step 2 for him to do. He struggles with phonics BIG TIME!!! You asked about therapy. He goes once a week and they reevaluate him every 3 months to see how much progress. They place games with him like operation, block game I forget the name of it but you try to remove some blocks without it collapsing on your turn (hence teaches him to be gentle). They have a large blue excercising ball he plays on and lots of other things. Owe also he does handwriting without tears for homework sometimes. Well hope some of this helps!
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#8 of 21 Old 07-26-2007, 11:35 PM
 
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There was some talk about this in a current thread:

How to teach this kid?

And do keep in mind how young he is - I remember having knots in my stomach when my son was little and diagnosed with development problems, but he's done really, really well academically, and has excelled in college. Hindsight tends to be ever so much more gentle on the stomach.

Here's an interesting article by Vivian Gussin Paley, an award winning kindergarten and nursery school teacher of 37 years experience, and author of eleven books. It's an excerpt from her book, Child's Work: The Importance of Fantasy Play. It ends with the line, "Expectations for incoming first-graders are quite precise, and the tension begins even before the teacher and student meet. The potential for surprise is largely gone. We no longer wonder "Who are you?" but instead decide quickly "What can we do to fix you?"

Big "A", Little "a"

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#9 of 21 Old 07-27-2007, 01:53 AM
 
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I have CAPD which is one of the reasons I am very uncomfortable speaking and am near mute IRL. When people talk I just hear "noise." Talking on the phone is even worse, I misunderstand about 80% of what is said. I need to see things written down, for that I have an almost photographic memory.

I would encourage him to express himself in writing and for you to type things out if he's having a hard time understanding you. My son loves to chat on MSN with me (he seems to have a degree of CAPD too)... chatting is fantastic for people with CAPD because we don't have to understand anything said out loud! It's all there in writing .

Also make sure to have the closed captioning on TV at all times.

HTH.
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#10 of 21 Old 07-27-2007, 02:19 AM
 
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Whoops! Sorry - I was reading and writing very, very hurriedly earlier - thought you were talkng about a child of 1st grade level - what you actually said was that it was your 1st year of homeschooling. - Lillian
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#11 of 21 Old 07-27-2007, 10:21 AM
 
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Kelly, I was never able to receive help through the school system for my son. He has a really high IQ, and all they care about is their standardized test scores, so they didn't want to label with anything since kids w/ ld's test scores don't count. My son was diagnosed through a private doctor, and we see a private OT.
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#12 of 21 Old 07-29-2007, 12:33 AM
 
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He's getting OT, right? Has he been evaluated to see if Fast Forword would help him?

If his auditory processing is really bad, the best approach for teachign him to read may very well be Lindamood Bell's Lips program. Expensive but often very well worth it. If it isn't that bad, I'd try

Earobics cd-rom
Sound Reading Solutions (cd-rom)
Headsprout
Read Write Type

Dancing Bears (from Sound Foundations) combined with ABeCeDarian (www.abcdrp.com) and I See Sam books. (Reading for All Learners). Or an intermediate step between this and Lips would be to try to do an Orton Gillingham program, either with a tutor or via Barton at home.

You want him to do lots of practice reading aloud to build fluency. Should be very easy material.

I'd consider Math U See for math, since it is visual and tactile.
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#13 of 21 Old 07-29-2007, 02:32 AM
 
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How good of a reader is he? I have some SPD/APD (goes with the autism bit) and I think dd1 and possibly either or both of the boys may have some too. Our world is very book-centered. It's much easier to read a book about something than to listen to someone explain it. If he's not (yet) a particularly good reader, this could cause more of a problem, but if he can get most of his educational input in written form, APD shouldn't be much of an issue.
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#14 of 21 Old 07-29-2007, 04:09 PM
 
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I wanted to add that my son's APD is mild, but there. He reads really well, so I write everything down for him, and if I verbally tell him something, I write it down as well. I'm also a very visual learner. I wouldn't be surprised if I have mild APD as well. He's like my little clone.
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#15 of 21 Old 08-06-2007, 10:38 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Sorry I've not visited my own thread in a week or so. Well that's just it he doesn't read well. He gets headaches almost immediately and starts holding his head. He was recommended to have vision therapy. Well we did 2 visits at $100 a pop and stopped. I need to take him for some more I know but funds right now with a family of 6 and one income it is tight especially feeling the crunch with two 6 months old twins formula feeding.: He also does not like sit down paper work. Cursive writing his ot uses handwriting w/o tears. I am going to check out the math u see site another pp posted about. Visually and tactile I think is best for him right now. Anyone ever use essential Learning Institute? I'm not sure how much they cost but the have been around since 1989 and specialize curriculum base according to the sn. Well thanks for all the suggestions mamas.
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#16 of 21 Old 08-06-2007, 11:03 AM
 
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I've never heard of it. I just wanted to mention we use HWT for writing as well. I think it's good for kids who have problems with writing, which my son definitely does.
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#17 of 21 Old 08-06-2007, 12:53 PM
 
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Honestly, if he's having vision tracking issues as well as auditory processing disorder, learnign to read is going to be physically painful and supremely frustrating. If you can't afford vision therapy right now (which I totally understand), I would probably back off with trying to teach him to read for the time being. Could the vision therapist design a home program for you to work with him on? But I wouldn't push something that's likely to generate little progress and great frustration for both of you! If you wait a bit and later can afford the vision therapy, then work on remediation, it will be far less frustrating and more successful, increasing the likelihood that he will enjoy reading.
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#18 of 21 Old 08-06-2007, 05:51 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terabith View Post
Honestly, if he's having vision tracking issues as well as auditory processing disorder, learnign to read is going to be physically painful and supremely frustrating. If you can't afford vision therapy right now (which I totally understand), I would probably back off with trying to teach him to read for the time being. Could the vision therapist design a home program for you to work with him on? But I wouldn't push something that's likely to generate little progress and great frustration for both of you! If you wait a bit and later can afford the vision therapy, then work on remediation, it will be far less frustrating and more successful, increasing the likelihood that he will enjoy reading.
I think this is excellent advice. My son had successful vision therapy at age 12, by the way.

Your son's most important need at this point, as you realize, is time to regain his sense of self and his ability to learn in his own ways. The fact that he hasn't been able to keep up with the school system's demands obviously doesn't mean he isn't capable of learning and thriving - and he needs to be able to really experience that. Don't worry about lessons and curricula right now - that's the last thing he needs - I'd continue just concentrating on repairing the damage that's happened in his struggles. Because it's really and truly the long term goals that are most important - his growing into a confident and capable learner by his young adult years. He's already doing a lot toward that - and including some of the resources that have been suggested for aiding his basic learning skills is plenty right now.

You mention looking for books he'll enjoy. Take a look through this page of annotated links and look for websites that have suggestions from librarians and organizations - but think more in terms of books you can read to him (as well as books he can look through on his own and pick things from if he chooses): The Written Word, Reading and Language. If you think of them not as lessons, but just as exploring the fascinating things in the world, they might work wonders. He'll learn - but he'll probably learn more if things are not presented as lessons or curricula, and the very most important thing he can possibly learn at his age is that learning about the world is exhilarating and that he is a natural born learner in his own rite.

Take a look at Vicki Cobb's science page - Kids Fun Page. Her little paperback books are delicious fun and can give him lots of knowledge about things his schooled peers or even many adults around him won't know about - including some pretty cool tricks. If you go to Amazon.com and type "Vicki Cobb" into the search box, you'll get a whole list of great little inexpensive books whose titles you can click on and then "look inside" or "search inside" in the Amazon site.

Also take a browse through my set of annotated set of science links: Our World and Beyond - you'll find some sites in there that can really light up his thirst for learning, but not if they're presented as curricula. You can do lots of fun science experiments with him, and it will be contributing to the big picture of helping him become a confident learner much more than if he were being given lessons. In fact, take a look through the whole set of Homeschooling Gateway to the Internet links for more things that can inspire him to realize on his own what a natural learner he is in his own way.

Try looking through the links on this page: Children’s Literature in the Science Classroom page, put together by an education professor - you may find a book or two he'd love to hear you read to him.

Remember to allow for plenty of decompression/deschooling time even after summer is over - it's really crucial. Odd as it may seem, summer vacation time simply doesn't seem to help in this regard - I've heard this time and time again over the years - it needs to happen during school season.

I know from my own experience how worrisome this can be - and I strongly recommend trying to keep your eye on the positives as much as you can and trying to forget about running him through traditional school methods that simply are not meant for him at this point. Lillian
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#19 of 21 Old 08-07-2007, 03:44 AM
 
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I just ran across an interesting article that made me think of this thread!

Learning Disabilities or Learning Differences?, a Home Education Magazine article by Marsha Ransom.

Lillian
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#20 of 21 Old 08-21-2007, 01:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I think this is excellent advice. My son had successful vision therapy at age 12, by the way.

Lillian---This is what we found out Friday about him. He had some vision therapy at the OT's office and she is now going to refer us to a dr. who performs this. We were seeing one but he is no longer a fellow and we had stopped going due to funds. I'm glad we didn't spend anymore with him since they no longer recommend him to patients now. Good news is the thearpy the ot did in her office lasted over the weekend. He had saw the ot on Friday at 11:00 a.m. He was seeing double this whole time and noone realized including myself. I guess like the article you sent from Pave says if you don't know that you are seeing different from everyone else you don't know there is a problem other than you don't catch on like your peers do. I am so glad we discovered this early. Doesn't sound early to me but according to the stats that is early and most are found at around 8th grade. eeek! I don't think I would have lasted that long. Teaching has been so very hard and has placed a wall between us, but now that we are homeschooling and not on a time schedule so to speak we can both enjoy being together mostly again before he started school. I thank everyone for all the terrific ideas! I am checking out all the links thanks for the support here at mdc.
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#21 of 21 Old 08-21-2007, 02:51 AM
 
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So it sounds like pretty good news in that now you have some information to work with. Good luck with it all. - Lillian
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