Spotlight on Leftfield Sept 16-22 - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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#31 of 50 Old 09-19-2007, 08:54 PM
 
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I don't know what it is with that word. I taught it to them back in March, I think. They were on a new word kick. It all started with humongous and then Ben had picked up "gargantuan" on a show called "Pinky Dinky Doo". So, I was teaching them synonyms for "huge" until we ran out. Then, they wanted synonyms for other things. I was looking for words that were analogous to concepts they really knew....like sad. I taught them 'melancholy' and 'elated' at the same time. 'Melancholy' was the one that stuck with Tommy for some reason. I think that, to me, it does have a very beautiful melodic sound to it. Then, we discovered that it was in that train song on my jazz CD and now it sounds even more appealing.

I can honestly say that I LOVE Pinky Dinky Doo b/c of the way they introduce new words. It has been a great sctivity for DD & I to try & use the word throughout the day. ") It's fun.

Lola , loving my DH, Mama to & we &
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#32 of 50 Old 09-19-2007, 09:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Wednesday the 19th

My homeschool day started at 6:38 am when Tommy, my cosleeping buddy, started chattering in a very chipper manner like he does.

Tommy – “Mama, when is it going to be morning time?”
Me – (muffled mutter)
Tommy – “How many numbers until morning time?”
Me – (grumbles) “100!”
Tommy- “1...2...3...” (He makes it up to 20 with some skipping in the teens.) Then, he cheerfully asks, “What comes next?”
I start him on the 20s and he gets up to “20-10” and gets stuck. I start him on the 30s, more awake at this point than I had hoped to be. I make a valiant effort to explain that he basically just has to count to 10 over and over again until he does it 10 times. Thinking he might have understood this at 40, I hear “41...42...43...83...84...85...100!!!! It's morning time!!!!”
If my kids ever sleep past 730, I'll be shocked.

Early in the morning, Ben colored. Tommy drew, which he doesn't normally do.
After looking at a long line with a stick and some small circles above the line, I commented, “Oh, look at the train you're drawing!”
Tommy- “It's not a train! It's 'One Thousand!!' And this one here (he points to 100000...) is one TRENTY!”
Tommy- “You know what's two 1000s?”
Me-”What?”
Tommy-”One-Trenty! That's a LOT! When I grow up and become an engineer and I'm going to have this number, one trenty!”
Tommy- (starts trying to sound something out and settles on the word 'goofy'.) “Mama, how do you spell 'goofy'? “
Knowing that he's been trying to sound out lately, I say, “Well, what does it start with? G-g-goofy...”
Tommy- “a Ghee!”
Me – “Yes, a 'gee'. What makes the next sound, 'oo oo'?”
Tommy – “Monkeys!”, collapsing with laughter.
Realizing he was right, I giggled. We had a good laugh, while Ben tried to explain that two o's make the 'oo' sound. Clearly, the joke was lost on him.

He was on a roll this morning. Later he asked, “Mama, when I am going to be humongous and be even bigger than you?”

At one point, Ben drew a map of what he wanted our new backyard to look like. He drew two tree houses, with a bridge leading down to a wooden dinosaur. In Ben fashion, he circled a couple of details and then drew a larger sketch of what those details would look like if they were bigger.

While I got ready, the kids looked through a pile of books while listening to another Henry Huggins audio tape. I vowed to make it to the library today so that Ben didn't have to listen to the same CDs over and over! The kids were flipping through some kids' anatomy books, the DK dinosaur encyclopedia, a Curious George book and “Miranda the Explorer”, among others. I asked Tommy for a kiss and he sternly told me, “This is the library. There's no kissing allowed!” Then, they went back to their book pile. I promised to read “Miranda the Explorer” (by James Mayhew) later.

Once we were all ready, we went to what we simply refer to as “downtown”; it's the big county seat and the big city in this area of the state. There are lots of things to do downtown, but I suggested looking for some obscure park I read about in a guidebook that I had never heard of. First we got coffee in a new place, a coffee shop that curiously sells woolen items. The kids played chess, or at least their own version of it. Ben is trying to remember which pieces move in which particular way, whereas Tommy is concerned with jumping and taking enemy pieces in any way he feels like it; it makes for contentious games. We talked about how the sheep had their hair cut and how that wool is spun into thread to make things in the shop, more of a lesson for Tommy than anyone else. We touched the wool stuff (super expensive!) and then moved on.

The obscure city park was very near the coffee shop. It was very small, a planned children's garden near an underpass. This whole section of the downtown area has been undergoing a massive revitalization campaign, one which probably started almost 20 years ago when the trees were planted in downtown and one that has picked up with dizzying speed recently as the area has experienced growth. A large and smelly old river was cleaned up and reclaimed. Now this river area is full of gorgeous city parks, upscale condos, art galleries, fancy restaurants and a large theater complex.

After playing in the “children's garden” for a while, we leisurely walked back along the river. We looked in the windows of several art galleries. Ben was really attracted to a boat sculpture that was made of crinkled newspaper strips. He wanted to look at some chalk art on the path, so we looked at those and discussed the famous paintings that they were based on. We discovered urban water sprinklers that were designed for kids to admire and to walk in. I wish I had known about those when we had temperatures in the 100s F!

We eventually ended up at large toy store, one that attracts people with its boutique toys and availability of toys to freely play with. This is not a homeschool particular, but I knew the MDC crowd would appreciate this: I got irked by a Mom who wouldn't let her little girl out of her stroller to play with the train table that she desperately wanted but she let her play with the dollhouse instead.

We wound up at the library where I was unable to find an audio tape of Paddington Bear, but I did find the BFG by Roald Dahl. It was part of the same series as the Eric Idle narration of “Charlie...”

It was actually pretty late in the afternoon when we got home. The kids watched Postman Pat and then the Magic SchoolBus space episode.

Before supper, Ben started working on a giant paper castle he's planning. He wants to make it big enough for Tommy to enter and play inside, in the hopes that it will give Tommy something to do while Ben listens to audio books. So far, he's drawn and colored about 5 bricks.

At supper time, one of Ben's remarks led to a zillion tangents. He remarked that men are taller than women, which led me to say that I would be taller than many men in the world, which required an explanation of how different ethnicities share common genes which give some general characteristics (e.g. skin color, height). That further required a list of exceptions (e.g. the U.S.) which were based on migrations. That led to a discussion about how many ethnicities, e.g. the English, are based on a mixed gene pool from various migrations (e.g. the Jutes, Romans and Vikings). There was a brief mention of the Native Americans originating from Asia. And there was a brief chat about the original humans probably coming from Africa, based on the oldest human skeletons that have been found.

Ben said he wished that the Vikings came to America so he could personally find a Viking skeleton (hopefully with a Viking hat). That tangent led us to talk about Vinland and how the Vikings could have hopped, skipped and jumped across. I mentioned that York, England has a big Viking historical center. Dh added that York also has fantastic train museum and that the Flying Scotsman from the Thomas stories is from York. Now, the three of us really want to visit York the next time we go to England.

Ben thought there was a New York in England, which led to a discussion about how the English named New York and other places in America after their homes. Suddenly, I had “They Might be Giants” in my head and I was saying how it used to be New Amsterdam. Ben wanted to know where Amsterdam was (and he thought it was a funny place name) so I showed him on a world placemat.

While dh and Tommy played soccer in the other room, Ben burst into the study (where I was typing this), complaining that he needed help with his giant paper castle. I'm not really good at architectural things. But I had him stand on the floor and I put papers around him and showed him how to estimate how much paper he would need to build the perimeter. We determined that he would need roughly 3 sheets of paper across and 3 deep. I pointed out that he would therefore need 9, with 3 3s being 9. Dh interjected that he didn't think it would be architecturally sound, so when I left them, they were attempting to use a box to brace it.

When I came back in, dh and both boys were busy taping paper together. They had decided that such a large paper box would not stand up by itself, unlike the small paper tower that Ben had already created. Dh convinced them to tape a panel across a recessed storage area to make a cubby-hole castle. Ben discovered an outlet under there and before I knew it, both kids were inside the castle, listening to the BFG audio book. Then, they went to bed.

Here are some pictures:
Inside a secret garden at the park:
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...sspot_wed1.jpg
We saw lots of butterflies at the park!
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...sspot_wed2.jpg
Some fountains to play in, downtown:
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...sspot_wed3.jpg
This is what the modified paper castle looked like in the end:
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...sspot_wed4.jpg
The paper castle turned out to be a great place for listening to audio books:
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...sspot_wed5.jpg
I found Ben like this right before bedtime. I don't know why he was in the box:
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...sspot_wed6.jpg
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#33 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 12:41 AM
 
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Sounds like a fun day!

Our kids love to hang out in boxes... we encourage it, as long as they're not trying to trap one another.

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#34 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 11:32 AM
 
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You son reading in a box reminds me of a book I read about a female Buddhist monk, who lived in some extremely harsh environments, praying all through the day, trying to find enlightment. She actually built a wooden box to spend her day in, (in her cave) and she would sleep there, eat there, read there ect. Perhaps your son was in a Zen moment.

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#35 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 11:34 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thursday the 20th AM
It's been another wonderfully lazy morning. I still need to shower and I should find the kids to dress them. I was the last person out of bed this morning, groggy due to noisy neighbors in the apartment below late last night. As I lay in bed this morning, trying to completely wake up, I could hear the kids chattering to dh over breakfast. Ben asked dh what the area around the North Pole was called. If the area around the South Pole was "Antartica", then what do we call the area around the North Pole? (The Artic, of course). Then, I heard them planning something, with dh admonishing them not to jump on me with it as soon as I crawled out of bed.

Their plans related to the empty box they found last night (in the last picture I posted). They wanted to turn it into a car, but they needed help with the big scissors. As soon as I woke up a bit more, I cut off the flaps like they requested, following by cutting out a door that Ben drew. They taped up a weak side and began drawing on the inside of the box. Tommy's job was to draw a radio. Eventually, Ben taped the discarded flaps to the back of the box so that it looked like an open, sideways box attached to the car. Then, he taped paper over the opening and said it was the car's trunk. Right now, an assortment of dolls are chilling in the cool car. They were arguing about what kind of car it was, but I'm not sure what they settled on.

Tommy took some of the human skeleton puzzle apart so he could put it back together. Mostly, they've played with the box car and given voices to the dolls that are riding inside. I caught a moth at one point and we examined that.

After the dh conversation and before the box transformation, they listened to some of the BFG on tape. Ben is listening to it again, while hiding in his castle cubby.

I'm not sure what we'll do later this afternoon. The kids cheerfully cleared off the entire kitchen table, because they want to paint. I need to get the paints out of the box so they can do it. I've just been procrastinating, because I'm afraid it will be too messy in this apartment. Normally, they don't spill, however, and dh did put some mats down. That's what we need to do in a little bit, since they were so excited about it.
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#36 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 11:37 AM - Thread Starter
 
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You son reading in a box reminds me of a book I read about a female Buddhist monk, who lived in some extremely harsh environments, praying all through the day, trying to find enlightment. She actually built a wooden box to spend her day in, (in her cave) and she would sleep there, eat there, read there ect. Perhaps your son was in a Zen moment.
I enjoyed reading this anecdote. If you don't mind my asking, what was the name of the book? I've been reading books about Tibet and northern India lately (my own, personal homeschooling!) and your book sounds interesting.
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#37 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 02:17 PM
 
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Thank you so much for sharing your days with us! I'm fascinated by Ben's love of audio books. At what age did he start enjoying them? Does he ever follow along with the tapes, matching audio to text?

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#38 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 02:59 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you so much for sharing your days with us! I'm fascinated by Ben's love of audio books. At what age did he start enjoying them? Does he ever follow along with the tapes, matching audio to text?
He's only recently discovered full-length audio books at age 6. Prior to then, he liked chapters on audio (e.g. Winnie the Pooh goes visiting and gets stuck), probably at age 4 and later. He's always loved books, but prior to age 4, he just had virtually no interest in listening to any non-music audio tape. He loved being read to, but for some reason, the audio book format didn't interest him. So, it's been a relatively recent thing.

About a year ago, I got a Curious George audio book with the matching textbook and he really loved it. The tape would play music to cue when the page was supposed to be turned. I wasn't very good about following up on that, however. Whenever I looked at that sort of audio book in the library, they never seemed to have stuff that he was interested in. It seemed like very slim pickings for that sort of format.
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#39 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 03:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thursday the 20th Afternoon

So, the kids watched TV for a while, as I exercised and showered. I got distracted by an episode of Mr. Roger's Neighborhood and I ended up watching a chunk of it. Mr. Rogers was talking to Lynn Swann, a famous NFL football player back in the day. Lynn Swann not only played professional football, but he also took ballet classes. His dance education pre-dated his football career. I really enjoyed seeing a big macho sort of guy performing ballet. I was glad my boys could watch that.

They also watched a Reading Rainbow episode about Ancient Egypt. They've seen it once before; Ben was very taken with the creation of mummies. The episode featured a book by Aliki called, "Mummies, Made in Egypt". I need to check that out at the library. It explained all the gory details of how the organs are removed, how fluids are removed, etc. It also talked very briefly about the ancient Egyptians' religious beliefs, which provided a tangent on how our religious beliefs differ and how they are similar. The book also showed the general geography of ancient Egypt.

In the episode, Levar goes to the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, where they apparently have several really nice mummies. Ben said at one point, "That's beautiful!" I mentioned how I was from Boston but how I have never been inside that particular museum. A short film was shown which showed actual footage from inside a Pyramid, presumably provided by the museum. Ben loves the part where the mummy is scanned and its head is recreated with clay.

Ben was looking at his DK Visual Encyclopedia of Skeletons so I offered to read it to him. It can be very difficult to read his books to him, because Tommy wants to be intimately involved in everything Ben does and he doesn't have the patience for all Ben's stuff. So, we put on the "Charlie and Lola" show for Tommy and I read to Ben in the other room.

For the 20-30 minutes while the show played, I read the pages he chose for me: ribcage, pelvis and skeletal varieties 1. He had lots of remarks to make and I had to give some synonyms for some of the words in the book, so we were both tired and completely done at the end! In the ribcage chapter, we identified the sternum/breastbone on our bodies, we read about the function of the ribs, and we learned about the types of ribs. Ribs 8-12 are called "false ribs" for example, something that cracked Ben up. We also saw some non-human ribs like snake ribs.

On the pelvis page, he showed me which bones the pelvis is comprised of and how they attach. He does not know the names of these bones, so I read those. We both learned that the two major sides of the pelvis are called "coxae". Each coxa is made of smaller bones; I don't remember the names but one was the ischium. We looked at a picture of human pelvis, in addition to that of a chimpanzee, cow and dog. It was interesting to see that the cow, dog and chimpanzee pelvises were very narrow in comparison to the human one. We talked about the coccyx and the sacrum, but we both got confused by which one was as he called it, "the sharp pointy part at the end".

On the skeletal varieties 1 page, we read about the basic types of skeletons. In addition to endo and exoskeletons, the book cites some sort of fluid filled structure in earthworms and trees. I took issue with the usage of the word "skeleton" as it relates to the last two, but I'm not really a science person. Ben got a little confused about endo and exo, thinking that one meant the front of the vertebrate skeleton and one meant the back. We cleared that up and once he understood it, he contributed some examples of his own, like the hermit crab (exoskeleton). He showed me how the tortoise has both types; that was very interesting to me. Then, he brought up jellyfish, because they are invertebrates but yet they are not crunchy on the outside; that led to a completely different tangent about an aquarium trip we took last year.

Some of the general words that I provided easier synonyms for (i.e. I read the original word and then gave a common synonym) were: respiration, inhale, organism, limbless, and tubular.

Ben started chatting about earthworms after I took issue with the usage of the word "skeleton" as it relates to them and we debated the color of the worm's 5 hearts. To placate him, I found some worm dissection pictures online. He was very satisfied to see the dorsal blood vessel but a little disappointed that it was not red like he imagined. We also talked about how worms are hermaphrodites ("No way!") and how they make "babies". With the mention of the worms' ovaries and testes, he felt compelled to demonstrate where his own testes were. (We read a book about human reproduction recently so the word "testicles" seems to come up at supper a lot.) I made some mention of worm poop, which led him to excitedly describe how worms speed up decomposition in the soil (he pronounced "decompose" in a cute way but I can't remember how) and how they basically make compost.

At this point, my brain was kind of tired so I decided to write this while they ate a late lunch. Ben burst in while I was typing, saying that he wanted to learn some "science facts". When I asked him what he specifically wanted to learn, he said he wanted to see the insides of the intestines and how they go through the body and eventually "make poop". Then, Tommy discovered some washable markers and that lured them both to the kitchen, where they are currently drawing. Ben pointed to the package when I was recently in their room and told me, "This says 'washable'." That led to a weird discussion about how washable markers are not fully washable at all, which led to me explaining what the word "semi" means; they are semi-washable, really.

And now, I hope to take a bit of a break while they draw. We're listening to the African music channel on xmradio, which is my new favorite channel, I think. Later, I'll probably take the kids out to the play area later, before dh gets home.
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#40 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 07:14 PM
 
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We're listening to the African music channel on xmradio, which is my new favorite channel, I think
We love xmradio! I love trying out all the different styles of music. One of my favorites is the clssical chanel. Which channel is the African music?

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#41 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 07:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We love xmradio! I love trying out all the different styles of music. One of my favorites is the clssical chanel. Which channel is the African music?
It's 104, Ngoma: The Sound of Africa.

It says that it's an online exclusive, which explains why I've never found it in the car. I have to log into xmradio on my computer and launch the online player to find it. I like the classical channel too. My guilty pleasure is the jazz channel, actually several of the jazz channels. My husband (and most people it seems) hates jazz. The kids and I are good with it, however.
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#42 of 50 Old 09-20-2007, 08:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thurs the 20th, evening and bedtime

There was more BFG at various points of the day. Tommy wants to be involved but he has a habit of talking over the tape. I set him up with a Laurie Berkener music CD on the computer. With that and the interesting Linux screensavers, he was good for a while. Isn't that terrible? The Linux people shouldn't make their screensavers so fascinating, however, because even I have a hard time walking by when one is running.

At other points of the day, Tommy removed sections of the human body skeleton and tried to reassemble them. We eventually put it all away because it had been out for a few days and it was getting trashed.

Ben really did learn the prefix "semi" wrt the washable markers, after Tommy decorated both of his hands while I typed this. Sigh. And as I said, about half of it remained after multiple handwashings. Oh well.

So Tommy obviously had a blast with the markers. And Ben drew a few pictures with his set:
1. Skeleton with focus on ribs and pelvis (b/c we read about it earlier). That massive thing right down the middle of the ribs is the sternum. I assume those black masses are lungs inside the ribs, because we had spoken about how the ribs are slightly flexible for respiration. I don't know how many ribs he drew; he didn't have the book in front of him so he may have been guessing. But the bottom two ribs are free-floating like that, only attached to the vertebrae in back. I learned something today! And then he drew the pelvis with an emphasis on how it's two massive parts (the coxae mentioned earlier) are held together. The pointy part of the end of the spine is the coccyx, a word I can never pronounce correctly (kind of like 'cinnamon').
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...thurs_dwg2.jpg
2. Internal organs on a human
http://i2.photobucket.com/albums/y6/...thurs_dwg1.jpg
The red/blue lines leading to the heart are "blood vessels that attach to the brain". The heart and lung combo is kind of small. The brown liver dominates the drawing. The green thing under the liver is the gallbladder, but he doesn't know the name or function of that; he just remembers that he's seen a green thing on the bottom of the liver before. The stomach is underneath that, followed by square intestines. The kidneys are tiny things on the outer sides and they attach to a yellow bladder (hard to see in this pic) with red ureters; he does not remember the term "ureters".

That's Ben: art, construction and science like I said in my intro. And as I said in the intro, this is what he needs to be doing. Sure, he doesn't know who the Mayans are yet and he can't define the term "antonym" (to recall that 1st grade thread) but this is what he likes so this is what he knows. I love watching him get excited about things that interest him. He wouldn't get encouragement or support in these areas in school right now; I think he'd be miserable, tbh. This is what he needs to do.

We didn't end up going to the play area, which was good because both kids got really tired and grumpy. They made a very small museum before dinner. Actually, there was just one exhibit, which was the small 3D paper skull from the other day. It's apparently "a million, billion years old" and it's the very first human skull. It has a purple appearance, not because of the purple construction paper, but because it's so old and it was impossible to carefully clean all the dirt off. There was just the one exhibit, but there was a lot of planning related chatter about the museum. I could hear Ben correcting Tommy every time T called Ben by his pet name, "Didi". Instead, I could hear Tommy saying, "Benjamin..." I asked Ben why he was insisting that Tommy call him "Benjamin" when he doesn't even call himself that. He something about official museum people, such as himself, never go by nicknames.

While I was making supper, Ben wanted to see my scales. I showed him how the "oz" meant "ounces" and how it was a way of weighing things. Then, he watched me try to get 10 oz of black beans. I think there were like 9 1/8 or something. I pointed out the fraction and tried to explain that it was less than 1...I tried to do a little general explanation of what it means and that if I got up to 8/8 that would be 1. Then I'd have 9+1. It's the kind of thing he's going to learn, I guess, just from practical applications like this and seeing it a lot.

Before bedtime, I read two of the "Chicka chicka" books to Tommy. Now, dh is in there, reading bedtime stories: Paddington Bear for Ben and whatever Tommy chooses in the world of picture books.

Do you know what I need to do? I desperately need to make up some homeschooling event calendars for myself. My printer is not working right now, so I've procrastinated making the calendars; I just need to do it online. Usually, I plot out all doctor's appts, concerts, storytimes, playdates, et al. That way, I can obviously see if anything clashes and I can also see if we have any massive gaps in the "something-to-do department." Maybe I'll go start that now.
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#43 of 50 Old 09-21-2007, 08:28 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I have no idea what we're going to do today yet. I think we might need to get out again today. It will be nice and cool for a change. Can you believe it's going to make it to 90F again this weekend?? It's nearly October and I am soooo sick of hot weather. Autumn is my favorite season, but I never really get to see it anymore. We won't get crisp fall weather until winter, basically. This always makes me long for the New England autumns I had growing up. I'd leave everything else of that weather, but I'd glad take the fall weather.
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#44 of 50 Old 09-21-2007, 10:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Realistically, I will probably type today's update tomorrow. I meant to do it earlier and now it's kind of late. I think dh and I are going to watch a show before bedtime. I will enter Friday's stuff tomorrow.
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#45 of 50 Old 09-22-2007, 10:15 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Friday the 21st
I wasn't sure what we were going to do today. Moving to an apartment has been an adjustment, with the biggest thing I miss being our fenced back yard. We're still trying to figure out a routine or a set of plausible routines, I think. We need to get out more to compensate for the lack of a yard, but we have to be careful not to go out too much. Being introverts, there's a fine line between going out too much and not enough.

So, we decided to head downtown for one more day this week. Earlier in the morning, Ben listened to the BFG on and off. Tommy built something with Ben's girder and panel construction set. They played with two baby dolls at one point, but I'm not sure what they did. Ben announced that he had written the word "spikey". Upon further investigation, we found that he had written "spicey" so I suggested he just draw a line next to the 'c' to turn it into a 'k'. Moments after this, Tommy asked me to help him write, "Mikey". The next thing I knew, the boys were playing some dinosaur soap opera, with Tommy's spiked dinosaur being renamed as "Mikey".

When we arrived downtown, I was really surprised and disappointed that my favorite map store was gone. I used to love that store, but I had not been there in a long time. I was looking forward to showing it to the kids. The store had some really odd and unusual things with a map theme. We were disappointed. We decided to get coffee and weigh our options.

In the coffee shop, we looked at the art they were selling and talked about what we liked and what we thought the art represented. Ben started chatting about the art class he is taking. He was saying how they were presented with fruit on a table to copy and that the teacher suggested they get up and walk around to get ideas of what they might want to add to their drawing. This was the class on Tuesday where they used oil pastel crayons, but these additional details were just now being shared. Ben was saying how he and another boy walked to the fruit display together and how they had both copied some element from each other's drawing. This led to a really good discussion of how artists, writers, etc get inspired by others.

I had picked up a pamphlet about a monthly poetry reading at this coffee shop. I am very interested in going, but I think it's too late at night for Ben. However, this led to a little discussion about poetry. Ben commented at some point that poetry rhymes, which led me to giving examples of non-rhyming poetry. We talked about haiku and I promised to read him some at home; I have a book of haiku on the shelf somewhere. We talked about a few elements of poetry. I tried to explain what a metaphor was, but I don't think I did a very good job. I used an example from a poem I wrote in high school, where I wrote about a hunched over giant but I was really describing a mountain.

This led the conversation to artists presenting one image (mental or physical) but implying another. We talked about how, in art, a painting of a concrete object isn't necessarily about the object; often, the artist might be trying to say something else entirely. We frequent the Art Museum, so we've seen examples of this before. And then, we spoke about how different people interpret art differently and how sometimes, the artist is purposely vague so that it takes a lot of thinking to discern what the art represents.

As we sat eating our chocolate chip muffins, we noticed a painting in front of our couch. It looked like a painting of a leafy bush on blue circular background. Ben liked the beadwork that had been glued to it. Then, he said that he didn't think it was a painting of a leafy bush at all. He thought it was an aerial view of a coconut tree on an island; we were looking at the very top of its tuft and the blue circular background was the ocean around the island. I had not looked at it that way, so it was cool to think of it in this different way.

We decided to just walk around downtown. We did stop by the Falls Park, but we only briefly looked at the waterfall. I had 2 hour parking and it's nearly impossible to get parking during lunchtime. So, we decided to just have a little walk and head back to the car. We walked under the bridge, where the kids discovered that they could make echos. Some really bad yodeling ensued. Then, Ben jumped inside a circular stone design on the pavement and declared that he was inside the Arctic circle. They were in good spirits and the weather was perfect.

We did eventually make our way back to the car and we went home. At home they watched some TV, including their beloved Zula Patrol and Cyberchase (math cartoon, kind of cool). Ben listened to some more BFG at one point and they did play again at one point, but I'm kind of vague on what they did. I do remember that he's near the end of the BFG, because he was talking about how the Palace staff is going to make a table for the BFG out of the Queen's ping-pong table.

We had to run out and get a few things for supper. In the car, we talked about Ben's cell project. The night before, I had made the basic structure for him out of two cardboard circles pushed together in a sort of perpendicular fashion. We talked about how he might want to tackle it. Did he want to paint it or color it with crayons? Did he need my help with the organelles? He decided that he would use crayons, after we determined that the tempura paint would probably flake off. And he decided that he would make two lists: one for what he needs to do and one for what he needs me to help him with. He picked up a free shopping list form at the store for this end. I get the idea that I will help by assisting with cutting organelles out and possibly reading some of the organelle names to him.

He wanted to do it immediately when we got home, but it was a bit too late. Dh was going to be home late due to work. I had to get supper set up. And then we had our chiropractor appt. We had been to the chiro's for her fun day earlier in the week, but we had to get adjusted on this night as we do every two weeks.

We headed to the chiropractor's, which is a favorite place of both kids. They played in her toy room. Then, when we went into the adjustment room, Ben and I looked at her pelvis model since we were reading about that earlier in the week. She answered some questions that Ben had about the pelvis. And she also said that "coxa" means "cow", which I thought was kind of weird. When we went out to the front room, Ben asked her if she could hold her real human skull. She kindly obliged him and showed the boys how the bottom jaw came off and how the teeth came out. Then, she let them hold it, which was really exciting for Ben. He found the hole in the skull where the spinal cord goes, something he had been wondering about. The chiro then explained how the brain gradually turns into the spinal cord and then comes out that hole.

By the time we got home, it was basically bedtime. Dh and Ben are *stlll* working on "Paddington Bear". Tommy requested the two 'Chicka Chicka' books, both of which I had read several times earlier in the day.
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#46 of 50 Old 09-22-2007, 10:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Saturday the 22nd

This was supposed to be my last day in the homeschool spotlight. I think I'm going to end it here. Right now, we're getting ready to go the Children's Museum, which is a bit of a drive. We'll be there for most of the day. It should be fun.

I've enjoyed doing this spotlight and I look forward to reading others.
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#47 of 50 Old 09-23-2007, 06:17 PM
 
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Thanks LeftField,
I've enjoyed reading your spotlight - although the week was to crazy to peek in very often!
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#48 of 50 Old 09-23-2007, 08:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by mom2ponygirl View Post
Thanks LeftField,
I've enjoyed reading your spotlight - although the week was to crazy to peek in very often!
Thank you.
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#49 of 50 Old 09-23-2007, 10:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mom2ponygirl View Post
Thanks LeftField,
I've enjoyed reading your spotlight - although the week was to crazy to peek in very often!
ya that.

thank you for that little window into your life.

Affordable organics delivered from GREEN POLKADOT BOX

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#50 of 50 Old 09-24-2007, 03:56 AM
 
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Thanks for sharing your life with us this past week. I really think I am going to love this whole Spotlight thing. How does one go about being spotlighted?

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