HSing with PDD-NOS??? Scared--Looking for some insights pls! - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 7 Old 11-05-2007, 09:36 PM - Thread Starter
 
mama2cntrykids's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 348
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Hi all!
OK, my 4.5 y/o ds JUST got dignoised (sp?) with PDD-NOS. He is currently in preschool (some at home, some at ps preschool--His older bro is HS full-time). So, in talking with the ppl at the center that dignoised him, I mentioned HSing him. Now, they didn't say anything against it, but they did say that he would need help with social situations and reading other ppl's cues.

So, are there other's out there that HS their kids with ASD? How do you handle HSing them AND helping them with social situations? Like with helping them to learn how to interact appropreiately with other's, kwim?? How do you help with the day-to-day "special" challenges that having a child with special needs requires? Any good HSing web-sites that deal with hsing the pdd-nos child?

Thanks SOOO much!
mama2cntrykids is offline  
#2 of 7 Old 11-05-2007, 09:57 PM
 
frogguruami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Under my rock!
Posts: 2,795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't have any websites to send you to but wanted to say that ds2 has a Dx of PDD/Autism.

I find the social situation thing to be far easier. He is able to tackle one situation at a time and I am able to intervene before things go bad. That isn't possible in PS.

I also don't have to worry, as much, about him being called names or bullied because he is "weird" or does socially inappropriate things. I am able to address these things right away while the situation is fresh in his mind not 4 hours later when he has forgotten why he didn't get a "smiley face" on his daily report.

He is also in "real life" situations instead of the institutional setting of a school. So he will learn from the beginning how to deal with the real world instead of learning how to deal with the school world and then RElearning how to deal with the real world later.

We are also able to structure our day to best accommodate his learning style. For us that involves minimizing transitions and lots of down time in between activities.
frogguruami is offline  
#3 of 7 Old 11-05-2007, 10:32 PM
 
blsilva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: California
Posts: 2,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We hs our ds who has Asperger's. Truthfully, this was what led us to hs in the first place. His pre-school experience was not great, and when we looked at the ps classes, we could not fathom where he would fit in. Kids like him, only with fewer issues, had a pretty tough time, both with other students and with the teachers.

For him, hs has made things enormously easier. Instead of focusing all of his energies on being still/quiet/following the rules, he can focus on the academics and learning the concepts. He can learn when he is ready, and take the day off for other activities when he has an off day.

We make sure to have times when he can be around other children, but in small groups that he can navigate without being overwhelmed, instead of large groups where he is more likely to have a meltdown, or to shut down altogether.

One book that was very helpful to me was Homeschooling the Child with Asperger Syndrome by Lise Pyles. I know PDD-NOS is not the same as Asperger's, but I have read that there are similarities, and this book was great for info about the benefits of hsing for these kids, as well as suggestions that are helpful.

Good luck!

Homeschooling mom of 2 rambunctious, loving, spectacular boys, wife to an incredible man who has been my best friend on this journey <3

 

 

blsilva is offline  
#4 of 7 Old 11-05-2007, 11:58 PM
 
crazycat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Posts: 657
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We HS our 6-year-old son with low functioning autism. Like the others said, it has really allowed us to focus on HIS needs - self-help skills have improved dramatically since we can work on them throughout the day, academics we have been able to teach way above what the PS was saying he was ready for and able to grasp simply by presenting it differently than they were doing. For the social aspect we joined a local homeschool group where we can pick and choose the activities and get-togethers that they offer several times a month. They have a weekly play day at the park or gym or other indoor facility depending on the weather, a monthly swim day, two or more field trips a month and seasonal parties as well. Most of the kids are typically developing, but there are a few with different challenges including speech delay and one HFA child as well. Like the others mentioned, with homeschooling we can pick and choose what we attend, expose him to real world social settings that he will have to learn to deal with anyway, and have the option of leaving early or me stepping in right away when necessary. We also have an almost 3-year-old son with probable PDD so it works well for him to be able to come to these group activities as well. It really is much better than what we were seeing when he was in PS preschool for 1+ years. There is an email list specific to families homeschooling children with on the autism spectrum at http://www.weirdkids.com/autism/aut2bhome.htm - the list owner also has a website that I have only looked at briefly but it looks like it has a lot of info on it. You can access it from the website above. Good luck!

Mamma to three boys : We love :::
crazycat is offline  
#5 of 7 Old 11-12-2007, 12:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
mama2cntrykids's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 348
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Thanks so much for the replies!

I'm not too sure if I'll be HSing him or not next year. The main reason is I'm soooo scared of not being able to provide for his specific "special needs", kwim? But, we are working with the local public schools' early special education director on testing him throught the school. From there, maybe we'll be able to construct something that would benefit him while I hs him? I'm not sure, we'll see what plays out.

I'm also scared that I just won't be able to deal with his "outbursts" AND educate him at the same time, day in and day out, you know? He gets so frustrated/angry SO QUICKLY and I am NOT a patient person, so that really doesn't help the situations. I think sometimes that he *would* do better with public school than with me trying to deal with everything.

I'm fine with HSing his older brother. It's almost a breeze (except, I'm starting to burn out in our fourth month hsing).

I guess I'm looking for some insight or encouragement here. I'm just not feeling competent in HSing my son with PDD-NOS.
mama2cntrykids is offline  
#6 of 7 Old 11-12-2007, 01:53 AM
 
blsilva's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: California
Posts: 2,088
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I can totally understand you feeling overwhelmed, but, to be honest, the reasons you gave for sending your ds to ps are the same ones I have for not wanting my ds there.
The way I see it, even the most patient of teachers, with 20+ students, is not going t be able to handle my son's outbursts, meltdowns, and other issues any better than I could. And, if we are having a rough day then we always have the option of taking a break until we are both in a better place to move on. He would not even have the option to so that in school. He would be pushed into doing the activity whether it is something he can handle at that moment or not, whether he is benefitting from it or not.
I really feel that hs gives us more choices and control for him. Maybe your school is different, but, in the schools we saw (and we toured several) kids like my ds were not treated well as a whole. Even on my worst days, I can do better than what he would have had there.

Homeschooling mom of 2 rambunctious, loving, spectacular boys, wife to an incredible man who has been my best friend on this journey <3

 

 

blsilva is offline  
#7 of 7 Old 11-12-2007, 11:10 AM - Thread Starter
 
mama2cntrykids's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 348
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by blsilva View Post
I can totally understand you feeling overwhelmed, but, to be honest, the reasons you gave for sending your ds to ps are the same ones I have for not wanting my ds there.
The way I see it, even the most patient of teachers, with 20+ students, is not going t be able to handle my son's outbursts, meltdowns, and other issues any better than I could. And, if we are having a rough day then we always have the option of taking a break until we are both in a better place to move on. He would not even have the option to so that in school. He would be pushed into doing the activity whether it is something he can handle at that moment or not, whether he is benefitting from it or not.
I really feel that hs gives us more choices and control for him. Maybe your school is different, but, in the schools we saw (and we toured several) kids like my ds were not treated well as a whole. Even on my worst days, I can do better than what he would have had there.
Thank you for your hug and insights! I guess I'm just thinking that someone that has been to school to deal with "special" issues would be more apt to handle it then myself.

OTOH, I know that he would be in a mainstream class with maybe a helper or maybe being pulled from class to get some help, depending on how his testing goes. And, I know that the teachers at the elem. school have had training with autism spec. kids. Oh, I don't know!! I feel so : and :
mama2cntrykids is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off