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#31 of 53 Old 11-30-2007, 03:42 PM
 
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Ah! What a sweet story, Jen.

I wish I could homeschool. You know, my son was attending a Blue Ribbon school in MI and he was pretty happy there. Then we had to move back to NYC.: It's the schools here making me want to homeschool but being a single mama and all (and I've been speaking with lots of single mamas who are homeschooling but none have given me a viable option, yet), I just can't seem to do it.

You children are very lucky to have you and be in the place they are in.

I'm so very happy for all of you!
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#32 of 53 Old 11-30-2007, 04:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi ladies! Yes, it brought tears to my eyes too! Mostly because I truely saw how unhappy he was for the first time. Ebony, I really hope you can get something going with the other homeschooling moms around you!

You know, it's not that the curriculum at the school is poor. It's an excellent one that provides a wide variety of oportunities...."IF" you're the kind of kid who learns from lectures and books.


I was pretty bummed today when I left the kids' Dr's office today. I made an appointment with their psychologist (the one that sees them every week for their ADHD) at noon and told him all the things I've mentioned here. He thought it would be best to first approach the teachers and try to come up with a reward system for good behaviors. Well, I tried that for about 3 weeks last month. At first, the teachers seem enthusiastic but then taper off after a while. They don't look for the "good behavior" as often which results in less stickers which results in a kid who thinks he's a terrible person. He also said, "Kids have to grow up knowing that they aren't always going to like what they are doing. Just as adults don't always want to go to work or just like at work, there may be someone very annoying that we *have* to deal with." I said, "I don't want my kids living in a fairy tale, pink fluffy cloud world. I don't want them to have a life without disappointment or have a fear of failure but they are only 5, 6 and 7. Why should they have to *prepare* for the disappointing adult work life? Maybe my kids will work for themselves...looks like it worked for you." He agreed and kind of laughed. He also said, "Kids in regular school don't always like what they are learning but they need to." To which I said, "I plan on letting the kids go at their own pace, learn from experiences but maybe about 10% of it will be things I will need to teach them...proper grammar and sentence structure, more advanced math skills, etc." At the end of the conversation, he said that he still recommended working with the teachers but also said that he understands that my kids might not be in the best system to learn.

It felt like he was doubting my ability to do homeschooling. I really went there because I thought he'd be very supportive. I told him that the only reason the kids were on Ritalin was to conform to the standards that schools place on them. It calms them down and helps them focus so that they can be successful in a SCHOOL setting according to the SCHOOL rules.


Sorry...ugh, this is getting long again. My appologies!




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#33 of 53 Old 11-30-2007, 05:06 PM
 
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Jen, I'm sorry the psychologist wasn't more supportive.

People are so wrapped up in the physical school thing. How do they think we ever evolved (although that's debatable to some) without buildings called schools? Geez.

You know, CT became the first state protecting a parent's right to refuse to administer ADD/ADHD medications to children. It's a pity we even need laws like this.

I have so many gripes about school and one is that- and I think this is especially true for boys- the sitting down all the time isn't helpful. Children need to be mobile. My son is so active. I think if you do 30 minutes of learning and then 15 mins of running to get rid of that energy we would see a marked, positive change in our children.
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#34 of 53 Old 11-30-2007, 05:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Children need to be mobile. My son is so active. I think if you do 30 minutes of learning and then 15 mins of running to get rid of that energy we would see a marked, positive change in our children.
Ebony, I totally agree. I myself have ADHD and take meds. Of course, if I didn't, this house would look like a bomb went off, my computer desk would be full of papers, books, etc and my life would be chaos at best! I honestly benefit from Ritalin because it keeps my head clear. I do see it benefitting my kids as well but I want to use it for the right reasons. I don't want my kid to *have* to take it because the teacher wants him more quiet or because his mind was wandering and he didn't turn in his test and got a bad grade.

The biggest reason I am deciding to go with homeschooling is that I don't want my kids to have a bad opinion about themselves. My kids ROCK and have awesome personallities!! They are very kind, loving, empethetic, fun, energetic, enthusiastic, inquisitive, special and full of life. Public school just seems to step on all that. It's not GOOD when your kid is the shiney stone in public school.



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#35 of 53 Old 11-30-2007, 08:38 PM
 
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He also said, "Kids have to grow up knowing that they aren't always going to like what they are doing. Just as adults don't always want to go to work or just like at work, there may be someone very annoying that we *have* to deal with."
Ah! Wow. So he's not just an M.D.? He's also a Dr. of both Philosophy and Psychology, huh?

Once upon a time, I met a woman online who told similar stories about her son, only he was having severe problems in the school setting and having stomach aches when he had to go to school each day. We all talked to her for days about how much better we thought he would be able to function outside of school. She did bring him home in the face of the teacher's serious concerns about what a serious mistake she was making, and she reported to us that he was much happier and doing well. Well, long after that, I was invited to a homeschooling information meeting that a support group was holding at a library (in a meeting room). As I sat in the circle waiting to speak, I noticed a little boy who was basically bouncing off walls with energy and restlessness - pretty hyperactive. But it was nice that he had lots of space to do it in, and was in an atmosphere where it as okay. At the end of the meeting, the mom next to me turned and introduced herself - she was the mom we'd been talking to online about her son, and she said it was all she could do not reach over and hug me when she recognized my name during the meeting. She said she and her son were so happy to be homeschooling, and they no longer thought in terms of an ADD label at all,. As we walked to our cars, she introduced me to him, and he was such a happy child as he bounced along beside us. Makes me misty just thinking about it... : - Lillian
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#36 of 53 Old 12-01-2007, 09:51 AM
 
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It sounds like the psychologist doesn't have much experience with homeschooling. Consider the source: his job consists of helping kids fit into a framework (school). He may have never thought outside that particular box.

He brings up a common criticism--that hsed kids are sheltered and won't learn about the real world. Here's a different take: nurturing kids makes them strong. There's no need to put them into a negative environment to "toughen them up." I've been looking and looking for an essay I read a few years ago by a teacher in charge of a gifted program. She facilitated a very small and nurturing child-led class, but people said it was too utopian and wouldn't prepare kids for the real world. She used this analogy: we don't break kids' fingers to prepare them for a broken arm in adulthood. Gross, but to the point.

Believe me, life itself, even homeschooling, has enough natural lessons in disappointment and frustration! The difference is that there is a caring adult available to help the child through, to learn and grow.

Doctors are as diverse as the rest of the population. Here are several I respect--I read their books for ideas on various educational issues, and was happy to discover they support homeschooling:

Eide and Eide, The Mislabeled Child
http://mislabeledchild.com/

Levine, A Mind at a Time
http://www.allkindsofminds.org/index.aspx

In this country, kids are expected to sit still before they are ready. Recent research indicates that many kids diagnosed with ADHD are merely at a different point in their development than other kids their age; they have normal brains, not a defect. Homeschooling gives kids the room to grow at their own pace.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/11/13/he...ar&oref=slogin
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#37 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 10:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
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It just doesn't seem like anyone around me is supportive. Here's what my friend wrote me in an email:

Ahhh...it all sounds so easy, but take heed my friend. If you homeschool, your kids still have to pass state exams and meet certain legal requirements.
There are many materials available and computer classrooms available to you as well...don't neglect these. There are also established extracurricular activity study groups that consist of those who are home-schooled, in order to give them opportunities to interact with other kids in a learning environment.

The free schedule sounds inviting, but you are better to stick with a routine. Kids need it - they really do. It gives them parameters and helps them to feel safe. Plus, it will keep the lines between home and school from blurring, which can be a release when they have a tough learning day. They have established school times and then it is over... like every other kids gets. It will also give you a steady schedule, which can be golden.



That doesn't sound at ALL like what I want to do. I guess I'm not really into the homeschooling but more into the unschooling. I don't want the classroom environment where they have to sit and do work according to a schedule. If that were the case, I'd still leave them in PS. I want a more relaxed atmosphere with lots of field trips and road trips!! I want them to learn about geology from diggin in a diamond field or learn about Native American History by visiting South Dakota's Crazy Horse Monument. We'll pan for gold in Deadwood then go over to the San Juan Islands of Washington State to go whale watching! Well, that's my plan anyway....lol Of course, there are always times at home where we can learn too with Discovery Channel stuff or our Leapstart World games....or the art museum, science center, planetarium, Zoo, Aquarium, etc.




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#38 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 10:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Believe me, life itself, even homeschooling, has enough natural lessons in disappointment and frustration! The difference is that there is a caring adult available to help the child through, to learn and grow.

In this country, kids are expected to sit still before they are ready. Homeschooling gives kids the room to grow at their own pace.
Hilmama, thanks for the references and support. I just worry that the "thought" of homeschooling is appealing yet the reality might be disappointing for ME. Like, what if my kids don't learn anything or want to do any of my lessons through exploring the world. What IF they get to a point where they surpass my intelligence (yes, hard to believe...lol) and I can't carry the ball.

I emailed a local Yahoo Homeschooling Group a week ago to get membership aproval but haven't heard back yet. I just wish I had more support from people IRL around me.


ETA: Does anyone ever feel like they are being WATCHED by others? Like they are waiting for you to complain or fail just so they can do the "I told you so" speech? It feels like everyone is giving me warnings instead of encouragement...and then waiting around to see if I prove them wrong.

:

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#39 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 11:11 AM
 
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jen636, hugs to you mama. i'm sure your friend's email was more for herself than for you. her email validates what SHE believes is best and she's entitled to her opinion i suppose. i would take it only with a grain of salt. it stinks that she can't find the words to say YOU can do this, as it's not about her at all, ykwim? homeschooling is really wonderful, but it does have its own set of challenges (like all things). any decision you make regarding the interests of your kids involves weighing out the pros and cons. i've always wanted to homeschool and i went through all of the same concerns and emotions that you have mentioned. i think most HS mamas do go through a phase of questioning their decision, as it's an important decision we make. for my family, we really love homeschooling so much. i'd be a liar though if i said i never get overwhelmed when i think about it long-term..... so i don't think about it like that at all. i just take it year by year, week by week, and day by day. also, one of the advantages with homeschooling imo is for every problem you encounter there usually is a readily available solution. whether it be socialization or a bad curriculum choice....those things can all be changed easily, ykwim??

just follow your heart. hugs to you.

homeschooling mama to DD 10 & DS 7 blogging.jpg

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#40 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 01:58 PM
 
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EDIT: I wrote:
"I really don't think you don't need to bother thinking about whether what you're wanting to do is called unschooling - it doesn't matter what it's called."

Too many "don'ts" - that should read I really don't thnk you need to bother...

Oh no! I just accidentally deleted the whole post - this was meant to be a separate one... Oh, well - some days are just like that... - Lillian
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#41 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 02:58 PM
 
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Ebony, I totally agree. I myself have ADHD and take meds. Of course, if I didn't, this house would look like a bomb went off, my computer desk would be full of papers, books, etc and my life would be chaos at best! I honestly benefit from Ritalin because it keeps my head clear. I do see it benefitting my kids as well but I want to use it for the right reasons. I don't want my kid to *have* to take it because the teacher wants him more quiet or because his mind was wandering and he didn't turn in his test and got a bad grade.

The biggest reason I am deciding to go with homeschooling is that I don't want my kids to have a bad opinion about themselves. My kids ROCK and have awesome personallities!! They are very kind, loving, empethetic, fun, energetic, enthusiastic, inquisitive, special and full of life. Public school just seems to step on all that. It's not GOOD when your kid is the shiney stone in public school.
This is what is happening to my son in school. He has been placed in "extended day" for reading "help" because his comprehension is "below level." When he is at home with me, he reads fine and can answer questions. He says everyone thinks he's stupid now. He stopped wanting to play sports and he's super athletic and has won 5 trophies and medals in 4 different sports. He hasn't made friends and doesn't want to make friends here. He doesn't like the children here and I don't either. He keeps asking me if we can move back to MI and he keeps telling people that he's moving back to MI next year. I have been in tears MANY MANY times since school has started. He is depressed. The nightly meditation has helped him but I really need a permanent solution to this.


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ETA: Does anyone ever feel like they are being WATCHED by others? Like they are waiting for you to complain or fail just so they can do the "I told you so" speech? It feels like everyone is giving me warnings instead of encouragement...and then waiting around to see if I prove them wrong.

:
Oh, yeah. When I homebirthed I think everyone was praying something awful would happen. My ex went crazy and forced me out of the state and I had to leave a good job and I haven't been able to get another good job since (that was almost 3 years ago) and I think my sisters, parents and aunts are secretly glad at my "failure."

I don't even speak to friends or family about my parenting choices unless they ask. They know better than to send me emails like the one your "friend" sent to you. No one says ANYTHING to me ever but I know they talk about me negatively behind my back all the time, and I really don't care.
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#42 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 03:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Lillian, thank you for the kind words and the rant!! I definitely needed that today! Sometimes I just feel like I need some reassurance that what I want to do is a good thing. I mean, I know it's a good thing but for some reason, people always feel they need to question my motives. I became a vegetarian 12 years ago and people STILL feel the need to question it, stir the pot and deliberately irritate me. Of course, this could have to do with the QUALITY of people that surround me as well. Then again, without family support, people feel alone and that's the other extreme. You're right though....I just need to keep things simple and not involve too many people in this. So far, the only person that has supported my decision is my sister but she doesn't even have kids yet! lol I do thank her for it though.

Ebony, that's terrible that your son is made to feel that way about himself. I hate that schools do that to kids. We as mothers KNOW how awesome our kids are and it's frustrating when kids have even a slightly negative view of themselves. He sounds like a very talented child! I hope that you are able to work through this.

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#43 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 07:29 PM
 
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Sometimes I just feel like I need some reassurance that what I want to do is a good thing.
Jen - there's no reason why you can't attend some local homeschool support group get togethers by yourself and meet some local homeschoolers - you'll sure find lots of support that way! They may even be doing some holiday events you can attend. And if you find a group you resonate with, you could take your husband to something so he can see the families and especially meet some of the dads. Lillian

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#44 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 08:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I got another call from the school today. Apparently Dakota wasn't trying very hard in school today and just kind of shuffling around. Well he came home with a 102 degree fever. : Gee, sorry my kid was being SO uncooperative. He said that he fell asleep twice in school (sooooo not like him) and he told the teacher he didn't feel good. Hmmmm...like I need another reason to pull him out?? ha!

I talked with my mom today. She actually brought up the subject of how schools are pushing the kids to be little adults and not giving them enough freedoms just to be themselves. (funny timing huh?) I agreed with her and pushed the issue further and told her what was going on with Dakota. Without realizing it, she 100% backed up homeschooling...LOL I didn't say anything about taking the kids out but it's nice to know I have her support...even if she doesn't know it yet!

Lillian, I'll do some searching. I know of another mom who homeschools and I e-mailed last week but haven't heard back yet. Soon I hope!



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#45 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 08:49 PM
 
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g. I know of another mom who homeschools and I e-mailed last week but haven't heard back yet. Soon I hope!
Here's a post that has links to list of support groups. Sometimes people find groups listed that they had no idea existed.

If it were me, I would go ahead and phone that mom again and/or email her again - because stuff does get lost in cyberspace. And you might try finding people here in MDC too - you never know!

PS: Here's a link to a website run by a wonderful teacher who's been tirelessly fighting the NoChildLeftBehind fiasco - Susan Ohanian Speasks Out. You'll find some very interesting reading there.

And hey, I'm so sorry to hear about your son being subjected to that kind of attitude by a teacher : - I know from personal experience how much that hurts.

Lillian
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#46 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 11:07 PM
 
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Ahhh...it all sounds so easy, but take heed my friend. If you homeschool, your kids still have to pass state exams and meet certain legal requirements.
In Michigan, there's no mandatory testing and the law just lists required subjects.

How to approach hsing is a personal decision, based on what works for you.

Also, IMO, the best early childhood/elementary approaches emphasize exploration. Reggio Emilia is one example--and two local schools, one public and one private, are R.E. schools. So, there are many, many different educational philosophies AND different schools follow different approaches. Homeschoolers are equally diverse. Your friend's vision is just one.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reggio_Emilia_approach

It's just not worth debating with people. Maybe she thought you were asking her what you should do or maybe she just has her own issues on education. Whatever the reason, the only opinions that matter are those of your (nuclear) family, really.

It's easy to feel under the microscope. My parents were/are opposed to hsing, and that's hard. But, I just try to tell myself that we know what's best for us and that eventually they'll see that it was the right thing to do (or at least not criminally negligent!)

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I just worry that the "thought" of homeschooling is appealing yet the reality might be disappointing for ME.
If you try, and it is, you can make changes. They also could go to school again, if you decide that would work better.

Quote:
Like, what if my kids don't learn anything or want to do any of my lessons through exploring the world. What IF they get to a point where they surpass my intelligence (yes, hard to believe...lol) and I can't carry the ball.
I am ALWAYS reevaluating. And, we toss things that don't work. And, try others. I mentioned that my oldest is almost high school age. I love math, and we've always worked together. But, last year, it seemed he wanted more independence, so he's used two math programs with video lectures, which are great (Thinkwell, Chalkdust). Looking at biology, there are free courses and AP course online; there are tons of resources. And, some kids decide to go to school at some point. I guess my point is that you shouldn't borrow trouble--they are still young.

I feel like whenever I talk or write about hsing, I sound like I never have doubts or worries, which is far, far from reality. I think it's just a part of parenting and hsing to evaluate and worry.
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#47 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 11:28 PM
 
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I snipped so much, but, wow wow wow, thank you for posting these links!

Amazing!

We just pulled our daughter from 2 mornings of preschool to one. She seems to like it in some ways, but when her teacher said she "needs to work on making friends" I began knowing this wasn't the place for her. Our daughter's life REVOLVES around her friends, she makes intense and beautiful friendships. Yes, she doesn't run with the pack and doesn't really know how, but, that is not something I think she needs to learn how to do.

Anyway, for someone (me) with so many questions, I'm really grateful you all have so many answers!

--Heather
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#48 of 53 Old 12-03-2007, 11:56 PM
 
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We just pulled our daughter from 2 mornings of preschool to one. She seems to like it in some ways, but when her teacher said she "needs to work on making friends" I began knowing this wasn't the place for her. Our daughter's life REVOLVES around her friends, she makes intense and beautiful friendships. Yes, she doesn't run with the pack and doesn't really know how, but, that is not something I think she needs to learn how to do.
It's come to that, huh? Needs to work - on making friends.... And how, pray tell, is one supposed to help a preschool aged child figure out how to go about working on making friends. Ridiculous. It can be such a pain in the neck to have to deal with people telling you how your child should be. One of the last straws for me was an overnight camp out at a beach for all the children and their families when my son was in 1st grade. There were about 24 of them in all, from k to 3rd grade level. Pitch black campground in the dunes and beach brush. The teacher had separate tents set up for the k-1st girls, k-1st boys, 2nd-3rd girls, and 2nd-3rd boys. They were to sleep in those tents - not in parents' tents. Bonding . And she planned to tell scary stories in the 2nd-3rd graders' tents.

I told her our son (who had been sick, by the way) didn't want to sleep in a tent with the k-1 boys - he wanted to sleep in our tent. She told me kids are given too much choice - they need to just be told more what they're going to do. But her opinion meant nothing to us other than being an annoyance - he slept in our tent! Just one more annoyance for her.

At one point, around the campfire, people were telling stories, and our little guy, who was ordinarily quite on the quiet and shy side, started telling a very elaborate story I'd read to him from a book about Native American legends, and telling it in a very animated fashion, in vivid detail, at that. I didn't even know he'd taken in all those details, much less that he'd spontaneously want to tell it to a crowd of people. But you should have seen that teacher's mouth fall wide open! She had him all stereotyped until then, and suddenly she just didn't know what to think! - Lillian


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#49 of 53 Old 12-04-2007, 04:27 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Reggio Emilia is one example
When I was pregnant with Sydney (ugh, over 5 years ago now!) I studied Reggio Emilia, Waldorf, Private, Public, etc. In looking over those those documents, I came across this today:

Two primary influences helped shape the public schools. (MAIN POINT)

1. The widely held Calvinist viewpoint John Calvin (1509 – 1564) was a French-Swiss theologian and religious reformer who emphasized the doctrine of original sin and of the natural depravity of the human being. Calvin thought that human beings are self-indulgent, lazy, prone to wrongdoing, and deserving of eternal damnation. Salvation can come only by the predetermined, arbitrary gift of divine grace to the undeserving sinner. Many of the ethnic/religious groups that settled in the US had views similar to those of Calvin. The schools they formed were based on a negative view of human nature and on an understanding of truth as something to be received, accepted, and retained. Since children are by nature lazy and disorderly, they must be kept in order and compelled to learn with threats, punishments, and rewards.

2. The other important influence on the public school was the concept of the factory system. The industrial revolution and the development of public education occurred at around the same time. The public schools incorporated many of the characteristics of the early mills and factories. The regimentation, discipline, and piecework was applied both to teachers and to children. The school day was strictly regulated by the clock (and time marked by a bell or horn in both schools and the factories).

By the end of the nineteenth century the public school system was established, and huge.

The pedagogy was authoritarian, teacher centered, competitive, individualistic, focused on orderliness and efficiency, and dedicated to children acquiring specific intellectual knowledge and specific academic skills. Memorization, rote learning, tests, grades, and rewards and punishments were key parts of school life. Public schools aimed to educate children but also aimed to make them obedient, hard-working, good citizens.

Yet even as the system was forming, alternative educational initiatives were arising. Some of these were based on a more optimistic view of human nature and of the child’s desire and ability to learn, and on democratic, egalitarian principles.



Jen Burnett, DEM
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#50 of 53 Old 12-04-2007, 05:50 AM
 
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I'm late to this thread but I did want to wish you a happy start 636Jen! I just loved reading about your children's reaction!
It's very normal to have doubts and some anxiety about this decision. I know I did and I liked the idea of homeschooling before DS was born. It's hard when people don't get it and I've found it helps not to discuss it much with those people. Many seem to just want to tell you what you should do and what your kids "need". They have strong opinions but no real reasons for them. For example I was told "Kids learn better when they learn all together in a group". If you are ever feeling up to a debate those kind of statements are easy to pick apart. People believe them without really having good reason to.

Something that baffles me: Why on earth would your children need to have clear lines drawn between learning and being at home? That doesn't make any sense to me, so no, I don't agree with what your friend wrote in the email (no offense intended towards your friend, of course!)

At least where you live you will be able to find support and lots & lots of other HSing families. I grew up near Detroit and think it's a great area for homeschooling. Even though the city could be a lot better you've got just about everything there. We were just visiting recently and went to Walking with Dinosaurs. The Henry Ford is amazing and we've also visited MSU's natural history museum, Ann Arbor's Hands-On museum, Greenfield Village, the Detroit Zoo and during a quick trip to Chicago we did some great things there too (planetarium & children's museum). Next time we'll have to try to get to the Detroit Science Center as it's supposed to be great and somehow I've never been there. And I love the Parent-Teacher resource store at the Doll Hospital & Toy Soldier shop.

Have fun bringing your dc home!!
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#51 of 53 Old 12-04-2007, 10:26 AM
 
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Yet even as the system was forming, alternative educational initiatives were arising. Some of these were based on a more optimistic view of human nature and of the child’s desire and ability to learn, and on democratic, egalitarian principles.
Thanks for posting such a great summary. I hope that Dakota is feeling much, much better today. Hopefully, the teacher will realize her mistake and not jump to conclusions so easily.
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#52 of 53 Old 12-04-2007, 01:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Cranbrook really has SO much to offer in one place. We visit the science center twice a year and they have a lot of different exhibits....some perminent and some "travelling" from place to place like the dinosaur one. We went to the Dinosaur Live show at Cobo in Detroit and the kids were in AWE! They absolutely loved it and one of the dinosaurs came very close to us. If we would have stood up, we could have touched it! Of course, my kids were the ones yelling, "Hey mom, did you see that Brachiosaurus? Hey mom, do you know what kind that is? It's a xxxxx" I turned to the people behind us (two grandparents with their 8 year old grandson) and felt I had to appologize for their outbursts and noise. They said, "Oh we just think it's great that your children know all these dinosaurs! They are very smart!" I don't think I'll ever get tired of hearing that...lol

You know, Greenfield Village has their annual Holiday Nights thing they do. All of Greenfield Village is transformed into a journey into the past (around 1902 I think) and everyone is in charactor! The streets are lit by lantern and there are groups of people singing Christmas carols. It's really fun and Santa is there!! He will call out the kids by name (his elf on the ground has a microphone to tell Santa your kids names) and he'll say, "Hello there Dakota! Thank you for visiting me!" The kids eyes just get wide and they are so excited!

Yes, we definitely have a TON to do around here.

www.cranbrookart.edu/museum/
science.cranbrook.edu/
www.thehenryford.org
www.detroitzoo.org

just to name a few!

Jen Burnett, DEM
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#53 of 53 Old 12-04-2007, 04:38 PM
 
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OT: I got a scholarship to Cranbrook when I was in the 7th grade and it was the most miserable experience of my young student life. I told my mom to get me out of there after the first semester!

Reading your summary of the public school system Jen really makes me wonder how we could keep this going but I guess it's the same as how we could keep slicing open women for no reason and promoting formula, etc.

Very disturbing...
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