5 dangerous things you should let your kids do - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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#31 of 48 Old 01-21-2008, 11:56 PM
 
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The straw was the day I went to open her bedroom door and she had unscrewed it!
that's hillarious!
my brother used to do stuff like that.

we were at a local computer repair guy yesterday, and he had a huge pile of old computer parts and stuff outside, he said we could take what we like. so we brought home one old computer, for DD to take apart

moonshoes, if you're interested, here is an article I wrote about learning to trust children to find their own boundaries, and helping them stay safe.

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#32 of 48 Old 01-22-2008, 06:39 AM
 
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I remember my brother taking apart stuff and turning his acoustic guitar into an electric one. he made a speaker with a shoebox. I think it is really neat when kids take stuff apart and we let dd take apart anything that is broken...she's fascinated with circuit boards.
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#33 of 48 Old 01-22-2008, 11:07 AM
 
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This is timely. I was just getting some flak the other night because DD5 was using a knife to cut out windows for one of her animals (she was making a house out of a cardboard box). I mean.. there are some things you just can't use scissors for! I think children should be able to use tools and be prepared to act when/if they have accidents. Much better than not knowing what to do at all.
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#34 of 48 Old 01-22-2008, 11:29 AM
 
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I am fine with knife use with supervision and making campfires and taking apart things, but I have issues with circuit boards. They have a lot of heavy metals and noxious substances in them. If a kid is of an age to try to build a computer/robot/whatever then I think that's okay, but if it's a little kid who might put some of that stuff in mouth then I'm not so into it. Check out this National Geographic article on high tech trash. I am all for taking apart old bell-ringing alarm clocks, just not sure I want my kids messing with electronics, etc.

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#35 of 48 Old 01-22-2008, 12:09 PM
 
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That's a great point, beanma. Something I didn't really think about..
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#36 of 48 Old 01-22-2008, 12:33 PM
 
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This is timely. I was just getting some flak the other night because DD5 was using a knife to cut out windows for one of her animals (she was making a house out of a cardboard box). I mean.. there are some things you just can't use scissors for! I think children should be able to use tools and be prepared to act when/if they have accidents. Much better than not knowing what to do at all.
My mom gets on my case for letting my 3 yr old use a knife to help with cutting veggies and such. She also thinks I'm nuts for the fact that my kids use real glasses to drink and not plastic cups. The glasses are even at their level so they can get a drink when they want. Yes, glass has been broken. They have learned that when glass breaks they do not move and they wait until I get there.
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#37 of 48 Old 01-22-2008, 01:45 PM
 
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My mom gets on my case for letting my 3 yr old use a knife to help with cutting veggies and such. She also thinks I'm nuts for the fact that my kids use real glasses to drink and not plastic cups. The glasses are even at their level so they can get a drink when they want. Yes, glass has been broken. They have learned that when glass breaks they do not move and they wait until I get there.
I just wrote a blog entry about that, right after I first watched this video. I wrote:




A lot of this reasoning would really naturally apply to AP mothers. After we AP our infants and toddlers, we have to progress into something else. We may not label what we do, but many authors have addressed the "shoulds" of middle childhood and Liedloff, Kohn, and Montessori each admonish the child has a capable person. We as parents have to remember that yes, they are children and that makes them different, but being a child is not tantamount to a disability.
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#38 of 48 Old 01-23-2008, 06:01 AM
 
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thanks for that link, beanma. I guess I'll make sure DD doesn't burn any of the computer parts we're taking apart this week, or stick them in her mouth

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#39 of 48 Old 01-23-2008, 03:07 PM
 
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A word of caution to those who let your kids take appliances apart. Yeah, I know that caution is being thrown to the wind in this thread, but still... Make sure that the appliance is grounded out and there is no electricity lurking! I was going to try to fix my microwave that was less than a year old when it broke and the appliance repair guy reminded me of this. If it has been sitting awhile, it should be ok, but I think all it takes is a screwdriver to a circuit? Somebody help me out here... I'm obviously not an electrician, but I know enough to know that I don't want to be electrocuted. Can anyone elaborate on this?
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#40 of 48 Old 01-23-2008, 03:24 PM
 
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Somebody help me out here... I'm obviously not an electrician, but I know enough to know that I don't want to be electrocuted. Can anyone elaborate on this?
Never ever take apart a computer monitor or a television (unless it is LCD, those are safe) The Cathode Ray Tube (the glass part) is connected to a giant capacitor (think of it like an instant discharge battery) so that when you turn it on it will come on imediatly. That capacitor has enough juice to kill you, and it can stay charged for months or years after the device is unplugged.

Any appliance that goes "POP" when you turn it on, and uses a lot of electricity could have a capacitor. Electric Clothes Dryers for instance have 2 giant killer capacitors in them. Some very high end stereo equipment has big capacitors included as well, but those are much safer because they are usually only 12-24 volt, but they are still dangerous.
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#41 of 48 Old 01-23-2008, 03:27 PM
 
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THank you Shaggy Daddy. I wouldn't have known that.
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#42 of 48 Old 01-23-2008, 04:15 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ShaggyDaddy View Post
Never ever take apart a computer monitor or a television (unless it is LCD, those are safe) The Cathode Ray Tube (the glass part) is connected to a giant capacitor (think of it like an instant discharge battery) so that when you turn it on it will come on imediatly. That capacitor has enough juice to kill you, and it can stay charged for months or years after the device is unplugged.

Any appliance that goes "POP" when you turn it on, and uses a lot of electricity could have a capacitor. Electric Clothes Dryers for instance have 2 giant killer capacitors in them. Some very high end stereo equipment has big capacitors included as well, but those are much safer because they are usually only 12-24 volt, but they are still dangerous.
Thank you!! I knew someone would have the answer to this.

Perhaps there should be a reference to this in the op? You know, just in case...
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#43 of 48 Old 01-23-2008, 11:50 PM
 
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Originally Posted by shroomama View Post
A word of caution to those who let your kids take appliances apart. Yeah, I know that caution is being thrown to the wind in this thread, but still... Make sure that the appliance is grounded out and there is no electricity lurking! I was going to try to fix my microwave that was less than a year old when it broke and the appliance repair guy reminded me of this. If it has been sitting awhile, it should be ok, but I think all it takes is a screwdriver to a circuit? Somebody help me out here... I'm obviously not an electrician, but I know enough to know that I don't want to be electrocuted. Can anyone elaborate on this?
what shaggydaddy said is true.
Usually, of course you unplug the appliance first. Some appliances dont actually have a capacitor, but they can act as one anyway. an easy way to discharge the power them is to hold down the power switch for at least 30 seconds (make it a minute to be sure), after you've unplugged it. this should discharge excess power.
Otherwise, with large, powerful capacitors, you can run the power to Earth (ground it out).

and still, if you have any doubt at all; don't risk it! its a great way to teach kids about electrical safety. always assume you might get a zap. use insulated screwdrivers and proper electrical tape for wiring connections.

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#44 of 48 Old 01-24-2008, 12:48 AM
 
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Yes, electrical safety is a good thing to know! Electricity actually really scares me. I am, however, not scared enough to go off the grid. I remember my dad telling me that one time he was unscrewing some part with a dime on some appliance when he was a kid. He hit something hot, it threw him across the room and the dime melted in his fingers. I also know a guy who is missing an arm because he was electrocuted and I knew another guy who died from it... So yeah, you can see why it concerns me a little.
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#45 of 48 Old 01-27-2008, 07:26 PM
 
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I haven't the time to watch at present, as I am stealing some screen time while soup cooks and DH entertains two tired and hungry kids, but this thread grabbed me. We've been letting DS, who's four and tool OBSESSED, play with tools since he was quite young. He got a hammer for christmas and recently we've been helping him drive nails. . Today he and DH were looking at the goody box: nails, screws, tacks. They left it on the bed because they were called away by me I think. Fast forward two hours and I find the baby mouthing something: it's a tack. I think I've seen the far end of nail use and that was it. We're coming up with a way for a four-year-old's desire to merge with his as-yet immature ability to clean up. We'll figure it out. He's also really, really into cooking, on the stove, and sewing needles. Knives are next I am guessing! His grandparents almost flipped when they watched him use scissors, which I found very silly.
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#46 of 48 Old 01-27-2008, 07:53 PM
 
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Oh, I should say DS has proprioceptive underresponsivity, which means he truly doesn't feel his body in space, so we have always struggled with how much leeway to give him because he doesn't know his own strength.
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#47 of 48 Old 01-28-2008, 01:52 AM
 
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I wrote about this on my blog and put up a poll to get some sense of what people think would be OK for a seven year old to do.

I do think that we generally have become scared for ourselves and our children and rely on experts and warnings and all manner of safety devices, but really could use more thoughtfulness and a good critical eye.

We let our kids use hammers. :

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#48 of 48 Old 01-28-2008, 03:02 AM
 
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I haven't the time to watch at present, as I am stealing some screen time while soup cooks and DH entertains two tired and hungry kids, but this thread grabbed me. We've been letting DS, who's four and tool OBSESSED, play with tools since he was quite young. He got a hammer for christmas and recently we've been helping him drive nails. . Today he and DH were looking at the goody box: nails, screws, tacks. They left it on the bed because they were called away by me I think. Fast forward two hours and I find the baby mouthing something: it's a tack. I think I've seen the far end of nail use and that was it. We're coming up with a way for a four-year-old's desire to merge with his as-yet immature ability to clean up. We'll figure it out. He's also really, really into cooking, on the stove, and sewing needles. Knives are next I am guessing! His grandparents almost flipped when they watched him use scissors, which I found very silly.
i remeber when i started kindergarten at the age of four, i had a skils test to determine if i was ready and scissor usage was part of the test

i let my 2 year old use scissors and definately got some flak at first but my mom has chilled out about it seeing him use them daily with no injuries
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