5 dangerous things you should let your kids do - Mothering Forums

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Old 01-19-2008, 12:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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This is an informative and inspiring talk on TED. http://www.ted.com/talks/view/id/202


ETA: Never ever take apart a computer monitor or a television (unless it is LCD, those are safe) The Cathode Ray Tube (the glass part) is connected to a giant capacitor (think of it like an instant discharge battery) so that when you turn it on it will come on immediately. That capacitor has enough juice to kill you, and it can stay charged for months or years after the device is unplugged.

Any appliance that goes "POP" when you turn it on, and uses a lot of electricity could have a capacitor. Electric Clothes Dryers for instance have 2 giant killer capacitors in them. Some very high end stereo equipment has big capacitors included as well, but those are much safer because they are usually only 12-24 volt, but they are still dangerous.



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Old 01-19-2008, 02:22 AM
 
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That brought back so man memories of my childhood, with fire and pocket knives, I think I was 9ish when I got my first knife. I was in guides and needed it for camping. I think I still have it actually. Maybe my son's 10th b-day I will give him one.

My son proudly tells everyone how he drove my car. 2 winters ago it was stuck in the driveway so while he reversed it I pushed it out. OF course anyone who finds out condemns me but hey he got it out of th driveway, never hit anything and was SOOOOO proud lol

Not sure about the whole spear throwing, think I will stick to baseballs. Then again as kids we had lawn darts lol

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Old 01-19-2008, 04:47 PM
 
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I think he's right on target. I'm really bothered by the hyper-safety consiousness that seems to exist today. Showing kids how to use tools safely is important, of course, but I've found them to be quite competent when given the chance.

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Old 01-19-2008, 06:35 PM
 
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Ahh...so thats why my son has taken up throwing things! hehe

No -thats really good.

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Old 01-19-2008, 08:28 PM
 
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My ds would LOVE to spend a week at the school!!
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Old 01-19-2008, 09:54 PM
 
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Now I don't feel so weird that my oldest and I were recently out setting fires in the driveway, when she expressed the urge to do this.

She just watched this talk with me, and got intrigued by the idea of taking apart old appliances (something she'd never expressed the desire to do before). So dh's given her some old keyboards to work with, and she's getting started right now.

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Old 01-20-2008, 02:19 AM
 
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I agree with him. My brother and I did all that when we were kids. It's funny because I look back at what we did and wonder how my parents let us do all that and yet we were safe. We rarely got hurt (maybe because I was always worried we'd get in trouble, lol). But really we were allowed to do lots of stuff that I'm going to really have to work to let my kids do.
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Old 01-20-2008, 07:00 AM
 
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DH shared that TED talk with me last week. Man, I LOVE that site

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Old 01-20-2008, 08:06 AM
 
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I have always encouraged my DD to play with matches, knives...but she has no interest in them.

I like that site, though. Good stuff!
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Old 01-20-2008, 05:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by majikfaerie View Post
DH shared that TED talk with me last week. Man, I LOVE that site

My husband shared it with me a few weeks ago too, he's a TED junkie. He and our 6 year old and 4 year old then took apart our old coffee pot, they're waiting for something else to stop working now so they can take that apart too.
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Old 01-20-2008, 06:08 PM
 
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So I'm not crazy. I plan on giving ds a pocket knife, he does play with fire, and he sits on DH's lap and drives the truck up our long driveway. I guess I need to find an old appliance.

Would love to send DS to that school.
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Old 01-20-2008, 07:37 PM
 
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Yep, when I was a kid we did things like lighting and stoking fires both in fire circles and wood stoves, chopping wood with hatchets and axes, climbing on large rocks and playing near steep cliffs, climbing tall trees, making play swords and fighting with them,we all had pocket knives, we all learned to drive when we were 13, we took things apart and built things, we used blow-torches, chain-saws and power tools.

Of course some of those things I didn't do as a small child. I believe I got my very own pocket knife at age 8. I probably wasn't chopping wood with an axe till I was 10, chain sawing came at about 13, blow torches were used when I was about 10 as well. I helped my brother build a house when I was about 13 which meant standing on scaffolding, working on the roof and helping with power tools including saws.

It's sad how protected and underestimated children are getting.

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Old 01-20-2008, 08:49 PM
 
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I am yet again, grateful that I spent so much time in the third world before I had dd, and raised her there too. it just kept me out of the hysteria of keeping kids "safe" that's so prevalent in the west, and we were in an environment where it was normal to let your 2 yo play with the machete. so we did.

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Old 01-20-2008, 08:49 PM
 
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Great timing on this. We just got the books The Dangerous Book for Boys and The Daring Book for Girls for our kids for Christmas. My son said the book says he needs a real pocket knife (with all the attachments; he has one with just a blade).
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:03 PM
 
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Great timing on this. We just got the books The Dangerous Book for Boys and The Daring Book for Girls for our kids for Christmas. My son said the book says he needs a real pocket knife (with all the attachments; he has one with just a blade).
I saw those books in the store, and thought they seemed dodgy for having seperated boys and girls, not to mention the message that boys can do "dangerous" stuff, while girls just get to be a bit "daring".
but maybe I was judging a book by its cover!

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Old 01-20-2008, 09:35 PM
 
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I saw those books in the store, and thought they seemed dodgy for having seperated boys and girls, not to mention the message that boys can do "dangerous" stuff, while girls just get to be a bit "daring".
but maybe I was judging a book by its cover!

There have been lengthy discussions about these titles. I, personaly, think that way too much is read into the titles. I think that by placing so much meaning into a title takes away from what the books are really about....being kids and doing things that kids used to do. Anyway, I think the books are great and either book works for either sex.
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Old 01-20-2008, 09:58 PM
 
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somehow I missed the debates about these books. But I can well imagine. Probably if I'd been able to flip through the pages, I might have a more informed opinion, but the books were shrink-wrapped in the store I hate when they do that.

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Old 01-20-2008, 10:18 PM
 
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I agree...shrink wrapping books should not be allowed!
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Old 01-20-2008, 11:37 PM
 
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DH shared that TED talk with me last week. Man, I LOVE that site
I dig ted, too.

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Old 01-21-2008, 01:11 AM
 
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i am on a very slow connection - is the text of this talk available anywhere?

also - is there a session of the tinkering school in 2008?

no longer  or  or ... dd is going on 12 (!) how was I to know there was a homeschool going on?
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Old 01-21-2008, 02:24 AM
 
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My ds would LOVE to spend a week at the school!!

Mine would too! However I just looked at the blog and the price tag for one week-$1000.00!

After our last homeschooling conference, where I discovered my daughter loved deconstructing the old electronics, I let her take apart an old broken CD player. That was all well and good, until I discovered her taking apart fully working, almost new electronics! The straw was the day I went to open her bedroom door and she had unscrewed it! Now we have agreed that she will get permission BEFORE disassembly.
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Old 01-21-2008, 02:29 AM
 
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Mine would too! However I just looked at the blog and the price tag for one week-$1000.00!

After our last homeschooling conference, where I discovered my daughter loved deconstructing the old electronics, I let her take apart an old broken CD player. That was all well and good, until I discovered her taking apart fully working, almost new electronics! The straw was the day I went to open her bedroom door and she had unscrewed it! Now we have agreed that she will get permission BEFORE disassembly.
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Old 01-21-2008, 02:33 AM
 
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Mine would too! However I just looked at the blog and the price tag for one week-$1000.00!

After our last homeschooling conference, where I discovered my daughter loved deconstructing the old electronics, I let her take apart an old broken CD player. That was all well and good, until I discovered her taking apart fully working, almost new electronics! The straw was the day I went to open her bedroom door and she had unscrewed it! Now we have agreed that she will get permission BEFORE disassembly.
LOL!!

DS (almost 5) loves to tinker, too. Today he built a rocket ship out of an old engine hoist, a tv antenna, an old carseat, a squash racket, and some electrical tape. He showed his little sis how to sit on the back and explained to DH and I that he's done with the "frame" and will add the engine tomorrow...(DH and I stood at the kitchen window watching and giggling as he added each piece). What an awesome kid!!

I will have to tell DH about the school. He was a major tinkerer as a child--oh wait, those freshly drilled holes in the side of the computer case are reminding me that this manis still a major tinkerer....

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Old 01-21-2008, 02:47 AM
 
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awesome advice! between me and kurt we've done all of these things...

climbing is the thing i get the most amount of flak for letting the kids do. they have a bunk bed and i let them play on the top bunk and my mom just freaks out!
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Old 01-21-2008, 03:49 AM
 
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I agree.

My kids do most or have done most of those things in some sort of fashion.

Go carts instead of cars.

They haven't played with fire much but my kids cook at ages that most people are startled with. My youngest started a fire and damaged a burner. My son because he has messed with fire he new how to handle the situation. WARNING FIRE EXTINGUISHERS are messy.

The girls use knives earlier than my son but my son had motor skills issue.
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Old 01-21-2008, 10:09 AM
 
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Climbing pine trees can get sap in your kids hair-then they have a bald spot "like daddy!"

Letting your children have pocket knives and muti tools means they will carry them every where,even touring D.C.Gets the security guards all in a tizzy.LOL

Taking things apart means your garage will be full of boxes and parts and wires.Your kids might stay in there late into the night instead of playing endless hours of video games.


Just thought I'd warn ya
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Old 01-21-2008, 11:10 AM
 
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That was all well and good, until I discovered her taking apart fully working, almost new electronics! The straw was the day I went to open her bedroom door and she had unscrewed it! Now we have agreed that she will get permission BEFORE disassembly.

Susan -- married unschoolin' WAHMomma to two lovely girls (born 2000 and 2005).
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Old 01-21-2008, 01:39 PM
 
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I agree with this too.

My DD got over her obsession with knives a few years ago when she got the knife holder down by herself after pulling a chair to the counter and climbing up on it to get the knives and started to cut open bananas one by one. She then managed to slice her finger pretty good and it gave her a good scare. She has always been very respectful of knives and VERY careful with them since learning that grand lesson at the age of 3. I think that's the best way a kid can learn about something dangerous is to experience it firsthand somehow.

My kids will also be taught how to be around guns from a young age. We've already introduced BB guns to our oldest two (no real gun yet). They are comfortable around them. They know they are not toys and they have no curiosity about them since we don't simply say "NO GUNS" and that's that. We know they are informed and educated about guns so if they are ever around another child that isn't then hopefully they will at least know what to do in the situation.

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Old 01-21-2008, 06:17 PM
 
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The titles didn't really bother me; I guess I don't tend to have a knee-jerk PC reaction anymore (I've either mellowed or become kind of slow with age!). My husband heard a good review of the books on NPR and wanted to get them as Christmas gifts, and he rarely finds the opportunity to go shopping or picking out of gifts, so I wasn't about to get in the way. We have one boy who considers himself a pretty traditional boy, and a girl who considers herself all girl, and a girl who considers herself almost all boy. They seem to like the old-fashioned quality of the books, and anything that coaxes kids "away from their televisions and video games" to bring them outside is OK in my book.

Here's some writeups/links of the books from the websites:

http://www.dangerousbookforboys.com/
http://www.daringbookforgirls.com/

"The Dangerous Book for Boys coaxed boys away from their televisions and video games and brought them outside, teaching them how to skip stones, fly paper airplanes, and build their very own go-carts. But girls, too, are inspired by games, heroes, and escapades. Whether you’re a girly-girl, an athlete, a brainiac, or a little bit of everything, The Daring Book for Girls gets you ready for anything—from pitching a tent and building a campfire to running a lemonade stand and learning about female heroines in history. The Daring Book for Girls is the can-do, how-to manual for enthusiastic, unfettered adventure. It cheers girls on to be curious and brave, and above all, to have fun."


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Originally Posted by majikfaerie View Post
I saw those books in the store, and thought they seemed dodgy for having seperated boys and girls, not to mention the message that boys can do "dangerous" stuff, while girls just get to be a bit "daring". but maybe I was judging a book by its cover!
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Old 01-21-2008, 06:21 PM
 
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well I have to admit my kids have never done any of these things. I would let them though, especially the fire one. I'm on the fence about the knives, but I think the point is completely valid and I need to "undo" some of my uptightedness (is that a word?)

I'm intrigued by these books and I loved the talk. Thanks for sharing it.

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