Can you tell me about your math curriculum?? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 04:09 PM - Thread Starter
 
Got_Cloth's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: Arizona
Posts: 972
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i think i have decided on science, history, and wrting program for next year for my girls, they will be in K 1st, and 3rd grade. I cannot find what i am looking for in math. I thought i found it, now i have doubts.

I currently use Abeka and i really do not like it.

so what do you use. Whatr do you love and what do you dislike about it??

thANKS!

Melissa- homeschooling mom to Samantha ( 9) Gabby ( 8) Emma (6) and Diesel (12 months) and Rachel Rebecca Brock Erik Joe Noah 6-25-10 5 early miscarriages
Got_Cloth is offline  
#2 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 04:38 PM
 
moominmamma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: In the middle of nowhere, at the centre of everything.
Posts: 5,601
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 40 Post(s)
My 9yo uses Singapore Primary Math and my 5yo uses Miquon Math. All my kids started in Miquon and moved into Singapore, with a bit of overlap where we went back and forth between the two programs. This approach has worked very well for them.

I love that Miquon sets up such a strong conceptual foundation, and that it's based on "guided discovery" rather than teaching and rote mastery. My little one is working in the Blue Book now and her understanding of place value is unfolding beautifully from all the Miquon games and puzzles she's done. It can seem a little chaotic to some parents, though, so it's not for every family.

I love that Singapore builds on their conceptual foundation, with a little more emphasis on algorithm mastery. I like how simply laid out it is and how little it requires of the parent. And I love the challenging multi-step word problems. Singapore PM may not provide enough practice for some children, but for my kids the lack of drill and repetition has been terrific. They tend to languish elsewhere in mathland for a while, then returning to formal math with a lot of readiness for new skills, and Singapore makes it easy for them to move quickly forward.

Miranda

Mountain mama to three great kids and one great grown-up

moominmamma is online now  
#3 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 04:40 PM
 
LilyGrace's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 2,284
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We use Math U See.

Dislikes - the price. But there's plenty that resell the materials when they are done.

Likes - the multisensoral approach. He sees it, hears it, does it, writes it, and teaches it. It helps him grasp difficult concepts with having so much involved. I like the simple manipulatives that work well with supplementary montessori work. I love that we control the pace, not the book. I love the non-spiraling approach - one concept is presented at a time and worked on until mastery instead of learning a little bit in each (add, sub, mul, div) in each book. I like how the books are not by grade level but use the Greek alphabet to distinguish themselves. Very important for a child who may not be on grade level for every subject. I like the forum on the MUS site, in which the owners are involved. I like the dvd teacher combined with the teacher's manual so that I both understand how to teach it and how we have the option of watching the dvd together.

Yeah, but the price? Not so great. Especially when going through 2 sets in one year.
LilyGrace is offline  
#4 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 04:41 PM
 
zeldamomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 2,226
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We recently switched to Math U See.

So far we like it. It's very much a back-to-basics arithmetic program where first you and your child watch a short lesson on video, and then the child works through some worksheets with the help of the math-u-see blocks (which I like better than any of the other math manipulatives we've tried.)

It's on the pricey side, that's the big downside IMO.

ZM
zeldamomma is offline  
#5 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 05:38 PM
 
elizawill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: right here
Posts: 5,321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
i've used a few.

saxon k - we liked it & it's very gentle & uses manipulatives solely to teach concepts. it's laid out for you completely too..... but it moved waaaay too slow for my dd and was priced incredibly high imo.

mcp math k - we liked it a lot - my dd flew through the book!

math mammoth - hooray! we finally found what we wanted!!! this is what we currently use and just love it! froggurami, an mdc member, recommended it on her site ....and it's the perfect fit for my dd!!! plus it's cheap! it is the same math used with winter promise curriculum (which means nothing to me really). i bought the light blue series. www.mathmammoth.com

we also love the grade 1 math cd-rom game here (it's an electronic workbook):
http://www.learningvillage.com/html/...athSeries.html

hth!

homeschooling mama to DD 10 & DS 7 blogging.jpg

elizawill is offline  
#6 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 06:12 PM
 
frogguruami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Under my rock!
Posts: 2,795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We use Math Mammoth. It is cheap, easy, you only need to order the parts you need... There is nothing fancy about it. That is probably why it works for us. Straight and to the point!
frogguruami is offline  
#7 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 07:02 PM
 
tammyw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I need to get something for K also, and feel so confused by this subject the most. I wouldn't mind spending the money on MUS, but how do I know if it will work best for us? How do we know if Mammoth or Miquon aren't better suited for us?

I want it to be fun and not worksheet focused - I've learned whenever something seems like work she fights tooth and nail against doing it. When it's something like a game, she enjoys. So I need to find a program that incorporate that style of learning. I have the book Family Math and it has some good ideas, but I really need something a little more structured so that it's easier for me to present to her. My brain gets too bogged down by my screaming 2 year old to focus on putting it together myself.

I'd also like to get some games that have been recommended here in the past. We did get Sum Swamp recently and that was fun. Is it "okay" that she counts on her fingers? I did bring out some manipulatives so she could add and subtract with those.
tammyw is offline  
#8 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 07:10 PM
 
homeschoolingmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 950
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Right Start Math.

Dislikes - In the earlier ages it is very parent involved.

Likes - I am not very good at Math and it lays it all out for me.

My kids love it!
My kids understand it.
There are a lot of games to go along with it.
It is very visual and fun.
Not much paperwork.
I like their philosophy. Like 35 would be 3 ten 5. It helps them with many things.
This sums it up...Ricky: Mom, can we play math now?
homeschoolingmama is online now  
#9 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 07:27 PM
 
Queen Gwen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Missouri
Posts: 1,832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another Right Start family.

Dislikes:

Parents need to sit with child through every single lesson in early grades (although, really, this is one of the things that is so great about it, because you're discussing math with your child and interacting instead of just shoveling it at her and saying, "okay, now you go do this")

"Yellow is the Sun" song taught in first couple of levels is incredibly dorky. We skipped it.

The books could stand some more editing.

Only goes to Geometry.

Likes:

The methodology behind it is so amazing. It's a combination of Montessori and some of the concepts used in Asian countries.

It lays everything out for you, so you don't have to figure it out on your own ahead of time. I do it totally seat-of-the-pants.

We had tried Miqoun (dd hated with a passion, and decided she was incompetent in math -- oh, joy, that curriculum took years to recover from) and Singapore (the way the concepts were presented didn't work for my dd, although now that I've used RightStart for several years I could go back to Singapore and do a better job with it -- I feel that RightStart has taught me how to teach math, in other words).

Another disadvantage is that it can be expensive to start up, unless you're an absolute math-manipulative junky like me who already had most of the stuff anyway.

ETA: If you hate to play card games, this curriculum could drive you bonkers. Because you play cards a LOT.
Queen Gwen is offline  
#10 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 07:37 PM
 
MsBirdie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Phoenix, AZ
Posts: 482
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
RightStart


Dislikes- Sometimes it deals with concep ts that I feel DD has mastered, so we skip that part of the lesson.


Likes- really teaches the visualization of math, I am seeing math in a new light, all laid out for you


There are a lot of games, DD likes it a lot , and so do I

Clothes make the man. Naked people have little or no influence on society.
Mark Twain
MsBirdie is offline  
#11 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 09:12 PM
 
elizawill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: right here
Posts: 5,321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tammyw View Post
I need to get something for K also, and feel so confused by this subject the most. I wouldn't mind spending the money on MUS, but how do I know if it will work best for us? How do we know if Mammoth or Miquon aren't better suited for us?

I want it to be fun and not worksheet focused - I've learned whenever something seems like work she fights tooth and nail against doing it.
i wanted to tell you that math mammoth is worksheet focused. my dd really loves it though! however, saxon k has absolutely no worksheets or texts for the student (except the small meeting book, and we used a kitty cat calendar instead). saxon k is purely hands-on with manipulatives & it's fun imo....but my dd didn't really like it as well as i had expected. it was expensive too with the teacher manual & meeting book and manipulatives! you actually could buy the teacher book used though, and you don't need to buy all the other stuff... i could tell you how to substitute them for much cheaper.

i've almost bought MUS several times as well....but the reviews are mixed that i've read, and i'm afraid to make another expensive mistake like i did with saxon. oh well....at least i have something we like for *now*

homeschooling mama to DD 10 & DS 7 blogging.jpg

elizawill is offline  
#12 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 09:46 PM
 
frogguruami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Under my rock!
Posts: 2,795
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tammyw View Post
I need to get something for K also, and feel so confused by this subject the most. I wouldn't mind spending the money on MUS, but how do I know if it will work best for us? How do we know if Mammoth or Miquon aren't better suited for us?
Unfortunately I think math is a very trial and error subject. You have to try a few before you find the right one. However if you are able to get to a HS convention or hook up with people in your area so you can touch and feel the curriculum before you buy it, you can make a better informed choice.

Part of it is determining what your child's learning style is. That will narrow things down for you.

Math U See and Right Start are very hands on so they are good for Visual/Spatial Learners. Math Mammoth is better for auditory or kinesthetic, IME. I can't comment on the other math programs because I don't know a lot about them.
frogguruami is offline  
#13 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 09:57 PM
 
Mongoose's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Posts: 224
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We use singapore. We are doing the earlybird right now (PreK/K math) I have the old edition for the first half and the new edition for the second half.

PRO: Not too expensive. The new edition is now closer in scope and sequence to PS (which is kinda nice if you have to do testing in your state). It is colorful and easy to do. It explains hands on activities to do on the bottom of the workpage that help it to be more hands on than just a workbook.

CONS: Kids seem to fly through the earlybird, but this might be fixed in the new edition. There seems to be a lot more pages than there were in the old edition. The old edition was 4 thin workbooks each about 70 pages. The new edition has a workbook and text book. The workbook is about the same thickness as the previous ones, but the text is a lot thicker. Also there is some reference to school as it was written for school use.

We really love singapore earlybird, I dont know yet about primary as we have not started it yet.
Mongoose is offline  
#14 of 28 Old 03-18-2008, 10:39 PM
 
jenniepaige's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Maryland
Posts: 523
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
What a great thread! I am searching for something ATM too. I have heard so many great things about right start math and I actually perceive math myself the way that they teach it and it really helps me do any mental calculations. My mom actually taught it to me that way and it stuck. DD loves to learn through games and such and only has a SHORT attention span for anything else. So, it seems to be a good fit. Perhaps to the OP from what it sounds like from you it may be good for your DC too? I dunno.

Jennie: SAHM to 3, student, and wife of almost 9 years.
Emily 7.5 Taylor 5 Logan 7.9.08 signcirc1.gif
mdcblog5.gif It's a collection of recipe's and tips on how and why to make real food plus some other good stuff!
http://purehomemaking.com/
jenniepaige is offline  
#15 of 28 Old 03-19-2008, 04:51 AM
 
tammyw's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Posts: 627
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Zoiks. Well I'm still so confused on where to start! DD (just turned 5) has various learning styles. She LOVES being read to - anything I read to her, she is happy. She loves listening to audio cds. She loves watching videos. She loves playing games. She really doesn't seem to like doing workbooks. She does like playing with manipulatives (a lot actually).

So I'm thinking from the above, we might do best with something like Right Start or Math U See? But still, I don't even know if that's accurate. I really feel like I need to figure this out since I don't want to buy five different programs trying to figure it all out, as I'm sure that would put me in the poor house! And I'm afraid Dd is the kind of kid who would be totally put off on math if we start working with the wrong program.
tammyw is offline  
#16 of 28 Old 03-19-2008, 06:42 AM
 
Jennifer Z's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Kansas
Posts: 3,871
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Miquon and Singapore is what we use. Miquon is particularly good for kids who are really strong on visual spatial skills. (like puzzles and things like that) to see the relationships. You don't have to have verbal skills to do Miquon, which is a particular plus for us.

Singapore feels more "traditional", and for us the lack of kill and drill is a big plus. If he runs into something that needs more attention I make up problems on the whiteboard to make sure he has the concept. There are additional books if this is a regular issue though and your child needs more repetition. For us, too much repetition kills all the joy and fun, and he usually gets the concepts right away and we actually skip some of the repetition if it is obvious that he knows it. For us, Singapore is more a practice of following directions than the actual math because the math is easy for him.

Mom to 10yo Autistic Wonder Boy and 6yo Inquisitive Fireball Girl . December birthdays.

Jennifer Z is offline  
#17 of 28 Old 03-19-2008, 10:34 AM
 
Ravin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Atenveldt
Posts: 5,928
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
DD is going to be a young K'er, so I'm holding off on buying a formal math curriculum until 1st. So far she's learning quite nicely with an assortment of manipulatives (math puzzle cards, a number line made of post-it notes, pattern blocks, games using numbers) and occasional forays into the Kumon numbers 1-30 book and a couple of other preschool math and multi-skill workbooks we've bought. She can count to 20 and is starting to grasp the concepts of addition and subtraction, as well as writing her numbers a bit. I am also going to get her the Funtastic Frogs math workbooks (we already have the manipulatives and activity cards), which appeal to her frog-obsession.

We're planning on using Miquon for first-third since I see the interest and joy in numbers in DD that I had as a kid developing, which makes an investigative discovery approach quite suitable. I'll probably go ahead and buy the cuisenaire rods in the fall so DD can have plenty of opportunity to play with them before I turn them to more directly educational purpose.

I've actually had a chance to take a look at the MUS materials in person, and if DD or another child has problems with the kind of approach in Miquon I'd probably go with it because it's more...straightforward, if you will, while still using a multi-sensory approach.

The groans of remembered misery DH uttered when I mentioned Saxon means we'll likely never use that one. It's the curriculum they used when he was in public school.

breastfeeding, babywearing, homeschooling Heathen parent to my little Wanderer, 7 1/2 , and baby Elf-stone, 3/11!

Ravin is offline  
#18 of 28 Old 03-19-2008, 11:35 AM
 
mommy68's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 6,599
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We've used MathUSee in the past and didn't like it. My son didn't learn well using that and it sort of messed him up. The last two years he used Glencoe/McGraw Hill math in school outside the home. Now we are using Switched on Schoolhouse and he really seems to enjoy it. We also use Spectrum.

Single (divorced), self-employed working, college student MOM to:

 

17 yr old

11 yr old 

 4 yr old

mommy68 is offline  
#19 of 28 Old 03-19-2008, 11:56 AM
 
elizawill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: right here
Posts: 5,321
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
tammy, if your dd learns best through hands-on, i would really recommend looking into saxon. it's full hands-on. my dd didn't dig it.... but your dd may think it rocks. it's the #1 homeschooling math curriculum ....so it must be a good fit for lots of families....just not my dd. i'm saving it though to try again with my ds next year before i resell it. i'd check it out at least if i were you

homeschooling mama to DD 10 & DS 7 blogging.jpg

elizawill is offline  
#20 of 28 Old 03-19-2008, 12:16 PM
 
alima's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Canada
Posts: 902
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tammyw View Post
I need to get something for K also, and feel so confused by this subject the most. I wouldn't mind spending the money on MUS, but how do I know if it will work best for us? How do we know if Mammoth or Miquon aren't better suited for us?

I want it to be fun and not worksheet focused - I've learned whenever something seems like work she fights tooth and nail against doing it. When it's something like a game, she enjoys. So I need to find a program that incorporate that style of learning. I have the book Family Math and it has some good ideas, but I really need something a little more structured so that it's easier for me to present to her. My brain gets too bogged down by my screaming 2 year old to focus on putting it together myself.

I'd also like to get some games that have been recommended here in the past. We did get Sum Swamp recently and that was fun. Is it "okay" that she counts on her fingers? I did bring out some manipulatives so she could add and subtract with those.
If your dd doesn't like worksheets, she will hate MUS. My ds loves it, but he hates anything that tries "to make math fun!" He wanted, and enjoys, a very basic, no games, no colour, no fun kind of program. It's worked great for him, he HATED Singapore with a vengeance, and wouldn't even look at Miquon because of the "fun and games" element. MUS is very plain and straight forward.

MUS does have a dvd they'll send you for free that demonstrates the program and how it works, I found that very helpful, and this site has lots of stuff you could print out and try out on your own before buying.
alima is offline  
#21 of 28 Old 03-20-2008, 09:54 AM
 
HikeYosemite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I used Miquon and Singapore for my son at first (because I got the Miquon for free!), and we liked it pretty well for him; he has good math ability. My daughter is more visual, so we are trying RightStart math, but skipping around. It is more time-consuming for me, so I also have her do some Singapore math (bought the workbook at a discount from someone who changed their mind) when I want her to do some practice in division, etc. when I am busy.

BTW, I have seen some used RightStart, etc. curriculum on http://www.HomeschoolClassifieds.com .

ETA: The manipulatives in RightStart are very good quality, and they can be used from year to year. It also includes a book of math games. You can find more reviews of curricula at http://www.homeschoolreviews.com/ .
HikeYosemite is offline  
#22 of 28 Old 03-20-2008, 09:19 PM
 
Lymeade Lady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zeldamomma View Post
We recently switched to Math U See.

So far we like it. It's very much a back-to-basics arithmetic program where first you and your child watch a short lesson on video, and then the child works through some worksheets with the help of the math-u-see blocks (which I like better than any of the other math manipulatives we've tried.)

It's on the pricey side, that's the big downside IMO.

ZM
I Second MUS. I don't worry about the price b/c you use the same materials for almost all the courses, so it ends up not being so much. Buy it used and sell it when you are done and you'll might even make money on the manipulatives and teacher's manuals. They resale pretty high. I've gotten a lot of stuff used from the yahoo MUS board and wished I'd started out that way. I like it b/c it lays a good foundation. As a former math teacher, I really am picky about programs. You'll spend more money if you end up switching around. I really think they have the best method of teaching out there.

Traditional foods eating, homeschooling mom of 2 girls (4 and 8)--Miraculously freed of Lyme disease last fall!
Lymeade Lady is offline  
#23 of 28 Old 03-21-2008, 12:19 AM
 
Leersia's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: A 50s ranchito CO farm house
Posts: 539
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yet another Right Start Math user. I am using it with my two DS5; they couldn't be more different in their personalities and learning styles and yet it is working for both of them. It is very hands-on for the parent during the lesson, but it requires very little prep - you can just open the book and go. I skip over a lot of the warm-up and review, and we're not working at all on the number writing, but it's flexible that way. One of my sons will not participate in anything like a lesson, so I just adapt the concept that I've gone over with my other son into some sort of a game for my reluctant son - its easy with this program because it is based on playing lots of games with various types of cards. Otherwise, my likes and dislikes regarding this program math the PPs pretty well. I was unsure about this program for a while, but now I'm convinced that its working very well for our family.
Leersia is offline  
#24 of 28 Old 03-21-2008, 01:31 AM
 
Lymeade Lady's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Posts: 90
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by tammyw View Post
Zoiks. Well I'm still so confused on where to start! DD (just turned 5) has various learning styles. She LOVES being read to - anything I read to her, she is happy. She loves listening to audio cds. She loves watching videos. She loves playing games. She really doesn't seem to like doing workbooks. She does like playing with manipulatives (a lot actually).

So I'm thinking from the above, we might do best with something like Right Start or Math U See? But still, I don't even know if that's accurate. I really feel like I need to figure this out since I don't want to buy five different programs trying to figure it all out, as I'm sure that would put me in the poor house! And I'm afraid Dd is the kind of kid who would be totally put off on math if we start working with the wrong program.

I choose MUS instead of RightStart b/c of MY likes and philosophy. I would go crazy always teaching a different game. I like things short and straight forward. My philosophy is to keep math very simple and very short. Then dd has time for free exploration and playing her own games. We used it for K and 1st so far (dd is in 1st now). She knows all her addition facts (without counting). I made up a game to help her drill facts She loves to hop, so I gave her a starting line and an end goal and told her to hop whenever she got one right and take a step back when it's wrong. I just noticed she needed a bit more drill.

Other than that we just do a quick page everyday. But we have blocks and a weekly video to go with it, so that's the fun part. Oh, and there is a music CD to learn the facts. If your child wouldn't be resistant to WS, I don't think she would mind. Sometimes, I fill them in for her as she answers out loud. Since we do a literature based curriculum this is the ONLY WS we do, so that helps to.

I think my dd might like the RS a bit more as far as math approaches, but she loves her free time too. We spend about 10 min. a day on math. And she can tell time and add numbers and pretty much on her own figures out that a "katrillion plus a katrillion is 2 katrillion". They do a real good job of place value too.

Right Start is also a very solid program, but it is a bunch of different games. Also, MUS goes up thru Pre-Calculus. I would definitely say no to Saxon or any typical school texts. Miquon is ok for kids that are geared toward discovering on their own. I may use it for my youngest dd to supplement b/c she would love doing it, but MUS will be my base for all my kids if I have my way.

I also use it to tutor. I have a homeschool junior who I'm tutoring about fractions and decimals and pre-algebra. He has done it all but with no understanding, so he can't do algebra. The MUS makes it all click for him. He is a completely different type learner than my daughter (I'm talking from professional learning style evaluation, not just a hunch.) So, I think it can work pretty well for any child. I hear tons of good things about, that occasionally somebody doesn't like it. Sometimes it's b/c they used the old program instead of the updated one.

I really think RightStart does help kids good the same solid foundation as MUS, but it seems to be more work. But if you like the games and don't mind more time and your dd would like the games, then RightStart might be a good choice. If you want something really simple, but that gives a good foundation and is hands on, use MUS. Don't do Saxon, Singapore is ok, and Miquon is for the bright self-discovering kind of learner.

By the way if you really want to understand how kids learn, I would not look at the visual, auditory, kinesethic approach. I would read the Way They Learn by Cynthia Tobias AND Nuture by Nature by Tieger and (something)-Tieger (married couple). B/c of the second book, I've had an easy type knowing how to adapt my dd's homeschool to her needs. But I pick curriculum based on my philosophy and desires for her education.

I hope this helps. Feel free to ask lots of questions. And look at company websites for samples so you can see for yourself.

Traditional foods eating, homeschooling mom of 2 girls (4 and 8)--Miraculously freed of Lyme disease last fall!
Lymeade Lady is offline  
#25 of 28 Old 03-21-2008, 02:51 AM
Banned
 
CharlieBrown's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2004
Location: garden variety
Posts: 5,142
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We use Math U see and like it so far. Second year using it.
CharlieBrown is offline  
#26 of 28 Old 03-21-2008, 11:04 AM
 
HikeYosemite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Posts: 328
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Just to clarify, RightStart includes some games, which you can use to reinforce concepts or not use, but it is much more than that. It is a sequential, Montessori-based curriculum using multi-sensory learning. It is not just a bunch of games. We started at Level D, so I don't have experience with the earlier levels.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Lymeade Lady View Post
Right Start is also a very solid program, but it is a bunch of different games.
HikeYosemite is offline  
#27 of 28 Old 03-21-2008, 01:32 PM
 
obiandelismom's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 427
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We really loved Miquon, but my ds has moved out of it. We're now working in RS C level and he HATES it, although he does think some of the games are fun. Maybe I didn't get him in the right level, but really, IMO, the issue is that RS is not a curr that you can pop into or out of. I would say that you should only consider it for your K level kiddo, because she will be starting with the RS way of thinking right off the bat. DS has spent so much time trying to understand 'the RS way' that he feels he's going backwards (and I tend to agree with him!) Many many people love RS, and I can definitely see the strengths of it, but in my opinion it is NOT a program you can just jump into in the middle.
obiandelismom is offline  
#28 of 28 Old 03-21-2008, 02:12 PM
 
Queen Gwen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Missouri
Posts: 1,832
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by obiandelismom View Post
IMO, the issue is that RS is not a curr that you can pop into or out of.
If you start with a level after Level B you need to do the Transitions lessons first, which are in a separate book. My older dd did Transitions (which doesn't take very long) then started at Level D.

My younger dd tried Level A, but decided she didn't want to do much math yet. No problem -- Level A and Level B are pretty much the same thing, but Level B does it all in more depth. Level B is the "real" start of the program. It's roughly comparable to 1st grade. You don't have to use Level A if you don't want to. So, for younger dd we started in Level B.
Queen Gwen is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off