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#1 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 01:29 PM - Thread Starter
 
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We're still deciding on homeschool for my dd (12) next year. One of my reasons for wanting her home, and this isn't the only one, is that I want her around for taking more responsibility for household and family activities. Since this sometimes feels like a "selfish" reason to part of my brain, and comes across so when talking to dh, I was hoping for some feedback.

I find helping run the household to be extremely important, along with the academic studies. This includes the day to day stuff like meals, cleaning, and laundry - but also care for animals (we currently have chickens and hope to add more animals as we can) and helping with food harvesting and preserving. Our goals are to produce the majority of our food and this is family project, not something that is just left to me and dh (and dh's time is very limited since he still has to commute to work every day). I also expect her participation/help with my sewing business on a regular basis as well.

The problem is that when she is in school, such as now, it is a constant struggle to get her help in these areas and I understand her complaints. She's been at school all day, has an hour of homework to complete, and then chores -- all she wants to do after that is go out and play and I don't blame her. However, because we're moving more and more toward a homesteading lifestyle which requires more work from everyone, I really need her doing more than her short list of chores. If we homeschool, it'd be easy to fit all of this in, but when I explain this to dh, it isn't very convincing.

I mostly looking for feedback from others that also find the life skills an important reason for homeschooling. Part of me feelings that the homeschool decision should be solely based on the academic and socials issues, but I can't ignore that this is a very important consideration for our family.

Karen happily partnered mother of 3 beautiful girls (teen/toddler/newborn).
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#2 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 01:34 PM
 
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The children are an important part of the family and I definitely feel it's important that they know how to chip in and help out around the house. My son is 13 and loves to load his clothes in the clothes washer and get it started. He isn't so good about drying them or putting them up afterwards but he helps at least. He will also help cook, something he loves to do! and he will also help with dishes at times and takes the trash out of course. Kids like to be helpers.

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#3 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 01:45 PM
 
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I think of homeschooling as a "lifestyle" not as an academic choice, does that make sense? So, in your case, homeschooling fits right into your other choices of a more homesteading-like lifestyle and the homesteading would, IMO, enhance your hs experience. Have you read that book about the family that hs'd their 4 (I think) boys (mostly unschooling if I recall correctly) and the boys ended up going to Harvard? (I know, I know, vague LOLOL sorry, it has been a looooong time since I read the book LOL). Anyways, if I can remember the book, I'll post again, but I'm sure someone here has a better memory than mine!

HS, to me, is about a holistic education. The idea of sticking children in a concrete box ALL DAY, making them sit still at a desk and attempting to drill facts into their heads is totally the wrong way to go about it. Allowing kids to learn in a holistic way, learning through DOing rather than drilling meaningless stuff is how they will retain important stuff. When geometry is meaningful (by, perhaps figuring out how much compost you'll need to amend the soil in your garden, or how to build a chicken coop, you remember it.. when it's filling in blank spaces on a worksheet, not so much LOL.

The fact that her being home will help your homesteading lifestyle is just the cherry on top.

I hope this made some sense. I'm on muscle relaxers and while I don't feel loopy, I do feel a bit, "relaxed" LOL.
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#4 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 02:25 PM
 
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I'll be the voice of dissent here. My 13yo, who has always attended school, knows how to cook, clean, do laundry, etc. She's more responsible with her chores than my HSed 12yo- in spite of her time contraints.

ITA that life skills are vitally important- but I disagree that HSing is necessary to teach them.

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#5 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 02:49 PM
 
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I think of homeschooling as a "lifestyle" not as an academic choice, does that make sense? .
Makes sense to me!

Is your dd on board with the family's homesteading plans? If so, I think that unschooling could be a perfect fit. If she wants to be in school though, I can see where she might resent being taken out, rather than seeing it as a great new adventure full of learning experiences.

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#6 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 03:07 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'll be the voice of dissent here. My 13yo, who has always attended school, knows how to cook, clean, do laundry, etc. She's more responsible with her chores than my HSed 12yo- in spite of her time contraints.

ITA that life skills are vitally important- but I disagree that HSing is necessary to teach them.
I agree that hsing isn't needed to learn these things, my dd knows how to do all these things quite well - the problem is that the in-school schedule doesn't allow her enough time to do them, along with other household obligations, without completely eliminating/severely restricting her free time. I want her to have free time to go and play with friends, but I also want her doing other tasks as well that don't fit so well between after-school homework and dinner time (the rest of the evening is usually family time and then bed).

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Makes sense to me!

Is your dd on board with the family's homesteading plans? If so, I think that unschooling could be a perfect fit. If she wants to be in school though, I can see where she might resent being taken out, rather than seeing it as a great new adventure full of learning experiences.
She's on board with the homesteading stuff, but not with the homeschooling plans. Thats a more complicated issue, she was a few weeks ago but is now against the idea again -- it all depends on if she's getting along with peers/teachers or not at the time. We haven't said yes to homeschooling, but I'm leaning more and more towards it even though it isn't (yet) fully supported by dd or dh (he's not opposed, just not convinced it'll go well and thinks I should just be happy to homeschool our future children and leave dd in school).

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#7 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 05:15 PM
 
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I don't know how I feel about your post, honestly. Even my schooled kids know how to cook, do laundry and participate in household life. I mean, it's just life. You live in a family that works together and you learn.

If you are keeping your child home and calling it 'homeschooling' so she can cook, clean, can, and help you sew, and that's not what she's interested in, or she is forced to do it, I can't be on board with that at all.

What level of freedom will she have? What does she want?
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#8 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 06:38 PM
 
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I think school getting in the way of life is as good a reason to hs as any. My son was in school, and it was a big waste of time - not getting much out of the time invested. His evenings and weekends were getting full of martial arts, playing with neighborhood kids, reading, and it started to feel like school was in the way of doing things that I (and he) felt were important. When we started to think about hs'ing, I jokingly said, let's keep all the extra curriculars and drop school, instead of dropping extras and only going to school. Turns out that made the most sense of all the options and it works for us.
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#9 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 07:47 PM
 
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Here is the sentence that most concerns me. (There are others ehich give pause, but this is the one that most stands out) :

~~~The problem is that when she is in school, such as now, it is a constant struggle to get her help in these areas~~~


I see that your dd is 12 years old and you are expecting. That is lovely!

However, your needing unpaid help to live the lifestyle you choose is not your oldest child's issue. It's not right to decide she's one of the bodies that helps determine your chosen lifestyle. You may need to hire someone instead.

Good luck with however it works out. I raise pastured, organic chickens, and I raise our own organic food, with a partner who travles **lots***, so I do understand the 'man'/human- power issue you face. It really is not easy caring for land and animals alone.
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#10 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 08:55 PM
 
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I agree with UUmom. While I think it's fine to expect a 12 year old to help with family enterprises, I'm not sure that I'm on board with taking her out of school so that she has more time to devote to your goals. It sounds like you have taken on a LOT, do you feel like you'll have enough time to homeschool your daughter in addition to caring for the new baby and all the other balls you've got in the air?

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#11 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 10:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Here is the sentence that most concerns me. (There are others ehich give pause, but this is the one that most stands out) :

~~~The problem is that when she is in school, such as now, it is a constant struggle to get her help in these areas~~~
I should clarify -- it is only a struggle when school limits how much time is available to do these things. When there is plenty of time to do everything (weekends, school breaks), she is always excited and willing to help with everything. But when there is only an hour of free-time available afterschool, then it's a struggle. With homeschooling - we don't lose 6am - 4pm (includes homework and travel times). In fact, the entires day work can be completed within that time with still time to spare, allowing much more time for free-time.

Our family values are that the entire family works together to make the household run. This has always been case, even living the suburban life. Yes, there is now more work involved as we move to a sustainable lifestyle and that involves skills that we feel are extremely valuable for our children as well - and she is excited about a lot of the things we do, but feels the time crunch when school is in session. I realize that having a working household isn't as common as it used to be, so I understand misunderstandings with families not set up with the same values. I also feel that her missing out on the majority of the day's activities is also a major opportunity loss for her.

And as I also mentioned, this isn't the sole reason for homeschooling - there are an endless number of academic and social issues with school that give enough reason too. But, I feel that this is something that is just as important as the academic side and was wondering if other people also rank these values with the academic ones.

As for the home business, this is simply another area that is an educational area that we also value. I grew up in the same situation, I was expected to help the family business and I know how much it taught me and am excited that I can offer the same experience to dd. Again, she enjoys helping, when she doesn't feel like she's losing out on free time, which I totally understand, I would resent working all the time if I didn't have free time either!

Karen happily partnered mother of 3 beautiful girls (teen/toddler/newborn).
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#12 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 10:27 PM
 
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homeschooling is a total lifestyle. life skills are sorely overlooked in government and private schools. i believe that life skills are just as important as academics. and i think that it is realistic to expect your daughter to be an active participant in your family.

i recently attended a conference and the speaker asked the question, "what 20 things do you wish you had learned before you were 20 years old?" the responses included cooking, balancing a checkbook, doing laundry, how to mend clothing, creating a budget, how to change oil in a car, etc. nearly everything that was said aloud was a life skill.

if your daughter is on board with homeschooling, you both may find that she has adequate time for "academics", personal interests and helping out with the family. it works for us. we tend to be pretty relaxed with our hs.
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#13 of 49 Old 05-11-2008, 10:42 PM
 
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Our family values are that the entire family works together to make the household run. This has always been case, even living the suburban life. Yes, there is now more work involved as we move to a sustainable lifestyle and that involves skills that we feel are extremely valuable for our children as well - and she is excited about a lot of the things we do, but feels the time crunch when school is in session. I realize that having a working household isn't as common as it used to be, so I understand misunderstandings with families not set up with the same values. I also feel that her missing out on the majority of the day's activities is also a major opportunity loss for her.

And as I also mentioned, this isn't the sole reason for homeschooling - there are an endless number of academic and social issues with school that give enough reason too. But, I feel that this is something that is just as important as the academic side and was wondering if other people also rank these values with the academic ones.


!
That's all fine, but I still don't have a handle on what your child's personal needs and wants are.
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#14 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 02:41 AM
 
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I agree that hsing isn't needed to learn these things, my dd knows how to do all these things quite well - the problem is that the in-school schedule doesn't allow her enough time to do them, along with other household obligations, without completely eliminating/severely restricting her free time. I want her to have free time to go and play with friends, but I also want her doing other tasks as well that don't fit so well between after-school homework and dinner time (the rest of the evening is usually family time and then bed).
That makes perfect sense. Life skills go beyond keeping a household and I find it very hard to teach everything with a full day of school and home work and the legitimate desire to just hang out with friends and spending lots of time on the phone.

It's one reason why I want to home school.
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#15 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 07:40 AM
 
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I'll be the voice of dissent here. My 13yo, who has always attended school, knows how to cook, clean, do laundry, etc. She's more responsible with her chores than my HSed 12yo- in spite of her time contraints.

ITA that life skills are vitally important- but I disagree that HSing is necessary to teach them.
I don't think H/S is necessary to teach a child to do things around the house either. I don't think anyone has implied that. I have a sister with two (almost college-aged) teens who have always done yard work and house work from as far back as I can remember. They've never homeschooled, always been in public school and are definitely typical kids and yet they still do chores and help around their home. She simply raised them that way.

My son was in school for the past two years and we just recently took him out to H/S again. He still liked cooking when he was in a school and he still did chores around the house as well. Being at home all day just makes it easier to do things. I don't think I've ever met a parent that didn't struggle at some point along the way with getting a schooled-child to do chores at the end of a long school day. In fact, I always felt guilty asking my son to take out the trash or clean his room because he was always tired and bombarded with homework. Nowadays he just does "most" things without me asking first. He has more time in the day since he's home all day.

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#16 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 09:28 AM
 
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So hsing to make sure the child has plenty of energy to do chores for the parent is a good reason to hs? Where is the child in this?
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#17 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 09:31 AM
 
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This thread makes me think that the Duggars would really be in a pickle if their teens decided to try high school. Who would clean the house and take care of the toddlers and babies?
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#18 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 09:45 AM
 
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I don't think it sounds like the OP's planning to be a slave driver...her family's lifestyle is no longer compatiable with the time school takes up. Removing school from the equation will allow time for her dd to have *more* free time to pursue her own interests, as well as participate in family chores/projects (I think it's reasonable to ask a child to contribute effort towards household chores, as long as it's balanced).

When my son was in 1st grade ps, he had literally 1 hour a day of free time, with getting ready for school, homework, eating as a family and getting ready for bed taking nearly all his waking hours. I couldn't bear asking him to do 1 chore a day, because that free time was so imporant to him (rightfully so). Now hs'ing, he has mostly free time, so contributing 1 chore a day is not a burden.
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#19 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 10:00 AM
 
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I need to hear the child's voice. It has nothing to do with 'slave driving'.

I don't think it's ok to think of our children as unpaid help for a lifestyle we have chosen, simply because they are our kids
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#20 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 10:32 AM
 
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I need to hear the child's voice. It has nothing to do with 'slave driving'.

I don't think it's ok to think of our children as unpaid help for a lifestyle we have chosen, simply because they are our kids

I agree it would be important to know whether the op's dd wants to hs or not, and what she think hs will be like for her.

However, regardless of lifestyle choices, to what degree is it ok for parents to expect children to help with household work? I'm not trying to be snarky, it's just that while I agree there is an extreme where a child could be expected to do too much work, there is also the other extreme, where a child never contributes to the running of the house, which would not be ok (to some people). I know families where the parents do everything, the child(ren) expect to be waited on and never do anything but school and their leisure activites; then there are examples like the Duggars where is seems the kids do as much or more than the parents. How do different familiies define what is an acceptable level of household responsibilty for a child? I personally don't find either extreme acceptable for us, but don't know how far each extreme would have to be to think of it as wrong.
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#21 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 10:34 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks so much for all the questions and feedback. This dialogs has really helped me organize my reasons in a much more cohesive manner -- basically able to go from gut thoughts to the deeper reasons behind them.
Even with talking to dh now, he agrees with the rationale behind the importance of these skills is more apparent than how I was originally presenting them.

UUMom - I realize you're still asking questions, but I get the feeling that we have very different parenting approaches and that more answers won't solve your questions. I've already said that my daughter is very supportive of our activities and is a willing (usually excited too) participant when she doesn't feel short on time.

Since I disagree that we shouldn't expect our children to be active participants in their family ("chosen lifestyle" is irrelevant as we're all living a lifestyle that we choose), there isn't any point in debating the two different perspectives. I know plenty of families that would have no interest in the way we choose to live, just as we have no interest in their choice -- luckily, we all have the right to make those choices for ourselves and our families as we see appropriate.

Karen happily partnered mother of 3 beautiful girls (teen/toddler/newborn).
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#22 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 10:35 AM
 
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How many hours of chores do you envision her doing once she is HS?

I cannot imagine more than 1 or 2 on a regular basis being good for her. I agree children are part of the home, and need to help to sustain the home - but I think it needs to be kept in moderation. Otherwise, I think she may feel resentfull. I also recognise that this is a family lifestyle - but that the adults chose the lifestyle. I think it is fair that the people who do the chosing are the ones who are primarily responsible.

I do agree that going to school form 6-4 plus homework is a huge chunk of time, and leaves precious little time for other activities. I think taking children out of school so they can free up more time for "life" is fine...assuming school is wasting their time. If school is not wasting their time it is a different story. Of course who gets to decide if school is a valuable use of time is really, really tricky (I know, I have a 12 yr old). At 5 you get to decide, at 16 - they do. But 12??? Different parents have different answers.


Good luck!

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#23 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 10:40 AM
 
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Thanks so much for all the questions and feedback. This dialogs has really helped me organize my reasons in a much more cohesive manner -- basically able to go from gut thoughts to the deeper reasons behind them.
Even with talking to dh now, he agrees with the rationale behind the importance of these skills is more apparent than how I was originally presenting them.

UUMom - I realize you're still asking questions, but I get the feeling that we have very different parenting approaches and that more answers won't solve your questions. I've already said that my daughter is very supportive of our activities and is a willing (usually excited too) participant when she doesn't feel short on time.

Since I disagree that we shouldn't expect our children to be active participants in their family ("chosen lifestyle" is irrelevant as we're all living a lifestyle that we choose), there isn't any point in debating the two different perspectives. I know plenty of families that would have no interest in the way we choose to live, just as we have no interest in their choice -- luckily, we all have the right to make those choices for ourselves and our families as we see appropriate.

I would say that doing chores on our little farm doesn't play into why we are a hsing family. If my children decided to attend school, I might have to hire someone to help--at least when dh is away on biz. We didn't choose a hsing lifestyle so they could do more stuff at home. My kids have so many interests that have nothing to do with my needs.

If my runner comes home from a meet, or my musican from an intense practice session spent, they don't have energy for cleaning the barn, for instance. I would never ask them to give up running or music because it took away from what I needed them to do. If your child's interests are the same as yours, you're golden. If she decides she wants to spend energy on interests outside your sewing and food prep needs, would that be OK with you? Right now school makes her too tired to help, but what if it was dance or another passion?
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#24 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 11:00 AM
 
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How many hours of chores do you envision her doing once she is HS?

I cannot imagine more than 1 or 2 on a regular basis being good for her. I agree children are part of the home, and need to help to sustain the home - but I think it needs to be kept in moderation. Otherwise, I think she may feel resentfull. I also recognise that this is a family lifestyle - but that the adults chose the lifestyle. I think it is fair that the people who do the chosing are the ones who are primarily responsible.
I agree with this, too. I feel like you've written me off as someone who doesn't get it, but what will you do if your dd decides in a year that she no longer wants to be part of homesteading, or that she wants to take up some activity that eats up lots of time? Homesteading skills are valuable, I'm sure, but if your dd is going to grow up to be a particle physicist, her time might be better spent taking a calculus course at a community college. Of course it doesn't have to be either/or, but you would need to be willing to let her step back from her homesteading duties to pursue it.

FWIW, my attitude about this would be very different if your dd was 8, but at 12 she's nearly high school age and my friends homeschooling kids that age find that it takes quite a lot of time and effort (even the unschoolers). Have you looked into college entrance requirements for homeschoolers? I tend to think that from a chore perspective the help she's able to give you may be canceled out by the time you need to put into her education.

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#25 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 11:03 AM
 
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So hsing to make sure the child has plenty of energy to do chores for the parent is a good reason to hs? Where is the child in this?
I don't think anyone has said that. You're taking all that is being said waaay out of context! If you don't do this in your home then I guess it would be hard for you to see it from a certain point of view.

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#26 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 11:07 AM
 
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I cannot imagine more than 1 or 2 on a regular basis being good for her. I agree children are part of the home, and need to help to sustain the home - but I think it needs to be kept in moderation. Otherwise, I think she may feel resentfull.
This is where we differ. I think it's okay to differ Like you said yourself, all parents/families will do different things.

But I feel that yes children are a part of the home but I want my children to just grow to "naturally" have the feeling that maybe they can take the trash out if they see it getting full or they can wash their dishes after they've fixed themselves a meal, that kind of thing. I do this by teaching them to help out with our stuff like asking them to wash dishes (or load the D/W) after dinner a few times a week. I'm in no way saying I'm forcing my 13 y o to do anything. I am a neat freak and my house gets cleaned by ME 95% of the time. I wouldn't allow my kids to vacuum, wash all the laundry, clean bathrooms, things like that. I do, however, think it's okay to ask them to do the occasional dish washing, taking the trash out, mow the yard, that kind of thing. And even those things are done by me on most days while they are doing school work at home or playing outdoors.

I in no way "expect" anything of them in the way of chores. But I believe that all kids should be taught how to tend to the house because one day they will be on their own or supporting a spouse and I want that spouse to know that I raised them to be respectful of how a home runs from day to day. I've heard from numerous women that complain about their husbands not doing housework and if I can help it my sons will never be that way. They may not grow up to do the majority of housework when they get married but hopefully they will have the ability to know when to do something around the house.

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#27 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 11:38 AM
 
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I don't think anyone has said that. You're taking all that is being said waaay out of context! If you don't do this in your home then I guess it would be hard for you to see it from a certain point of view.
I'll try to say just one more thing. (If you know me, that's going to be hard to believe! lol)

The one more thing is this:

Parents (this is MDC, after all, right?) need to be careful that we see our children as individuals, and not as extentions of ourselves. If this child wants to stay home to help run the household, I think that's fantastic and worthy. If she decides to focus on her own passions at some point (she's 12), I hope that she will be allowed to do so, even if that means she has less energy to to give to a lifestyle her parents chose for themselves.

It's not that I do not value a family working together on common goals-- sharing chores, being one-- as I most certainly do.
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#28 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 12:04 PM
 
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This is where we differ. I think it's okay to differ Like you said yourself, all parents/families will do different things.

But I feel that yes children are a part of the home but I want my children to just grow to "naturally" have the feeling that maybe they can take the trash out if they see it getting full or they can wash their dishes after they've fixed themselves a meal, that kind of thing. I do this by teaching them to help out with our stuff like asking them to wash dishes (or load the D/W) after dinner a few times a week. I'm in no way saying I'm forcing my 13 y o to do anything. I am a neat freak and my house gets cleaned by ME 95% of the time. I wouldn't allow my kids to vacuum, wash all the laundry, clean bathrooms, things like that. I do, however, think it's okay to ask them to do the occasional dish washing, taking the trash out, mow the yard, that kind of thing. And even those things are done by me on most days while they are doing school work at home or playing outdoors.

I in no way "expect" anything of them in the way of chores. But I believe that all kids should be taught how to tend to the house because one day they will be on their own or supporting a spouse and I want that spouse to know that I raised them to be respectful of how a home runs from day to day. I've heard from numerous women that complain about their husbands not doing housework and if I can help it my sons will never be that way. They may not grow up to do the majority of housework when they get married but hopefully they will have the ability to know when to do something around the house.
I do not think we disagree I think learning life skills and helping maintain the home is really important. I am working towards (so far unsuccessfully) children being self motivated to do work when they see it.

However I do think withdrawing a child from school if the primary reason for withdrawing is to do extra work is not a great idea. I do know the OP did not say that, but it is a direction the conversation has taken.

I think there is a big difference between a parent and child agreeing to HS so the child can free up more time to live her life (which very well may include working a homestead) and withdrawing a child from school with the expectation/for the purpose of doing more homesteading work.

kathy
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#29 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 12:09 PM
 
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This is timely for us. My sister is 12 and has chosen to live with us, mostly for the homeschooling (but my dad is having some problems right now and this is good for everyone).

We are going to by a house in the next 6-12 months. We are hoping for 10+ acres and becoming more and more self sustainable as time goes on.

Even without land and animals to take care of I struggle with how much household responsibility to give her. She loves to cook and most days does lunch all alone and a large part of dinner, breakfast is usually cereal, but again, if anyone cooks something it is almost always her. This is so nice for me, and it is great that it is also something she really enjoys. She is always asking for kitchen items for presents, when we get library books, she almost always gets a cookbook or two. Would she have to cook if she wasn't so interested? Yes, but probably more like 1 or 2 meals a week, not every day.

Again, it will be nice to have her help when we get a garden and livestock. But again, it is also something she is really interested in. She really wants goats and has been researching what breed we should get, how to take care of them, how much space they need, ect. I expect when we get them they will be largely her responsibility. Again, would she have to do some feeding and taking care of animals when we get them? Yes, but much less then she is asking for now.

Right now all the kids do about an hour of chores a day (we do 3 aprox. 20 minute cleans before each meal), and with the extra time she spend cooking and with her dog, there are probably days she already does 2 hours of chores a day. I can see it easily being 3 or 4 hours a day with a garden and livestock to take care of.

Right now what she wants to be most is a chef or a vet. But I do try to keep in mind that she might end up anything else. And I also see that having them here to help make our family work better, can free up time and money for saxophone lessons, or classes at the community college. Or at least figuring out now that they don't really want to cook or clean up poop everyday for the rest of thier lives. When and if that happens we'll go from there.
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#30 of 49 Old 05-12-2008, 12:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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However I do think withdrawing a child from school if the primary reason for withdrawing is to do extra work is not a great idea. I do know the OP did not say that, but it is a direction the conversation has taken.
Right, I've said many times this isn't the reason we're looking to home school (we have other reasons to do so and wouldn't consider hs if this was all we had), but it is a factor that I haven't heard much about from other families and wanted to see a discussion on. All I've heard about is academic and out-of-home-activities reasons, I wanted to see if other people consider home-based activities to be just as important - though not the sole reason. Of course, I'm sure I'd get a much different response asking such a question among other families that this is a normal style of life, versus where it seems to be something 'different' here.

Also, I'm sure that if I'd written this more slanted towards homeschooling opportunities available through the care and management of livestock (and the showing of animals at fairs), the planning, cultivation, harvesting, and preservation of food, in addition to the skills associated with running a household and small business, it'd be a very different discussion. But when approaching those same activities in terms of household/family responsibilities - it's different and seems to be classified as a few as a parent-inflicted lifestyle choice, which I'm sure my farming neighbors would find the whole idea incredibly amusing - for them, its just life.

My question was narrowly focused on purpose and it's scope doesn't include all the learning activities that are involved with hs plans we've discussed. Thats a whole different topic and I'm specifically not delving into it because it's not related to getting perspective on this one area. However, I see by not adding all those extra details, it leads some people to focus on this as the only things we're interested in - thats not the case.

Karen happily partnered mother of 3 beautiful girls (teen/toddler/newborn).
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