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Old 10-24-2008, 12:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, I took my 5 yr old DS out of public school a month ago and have only done about 5 hours total of "schoolwork" since. I need help.

Background Info:

DS is 5. He's a very active kid. He likes worksheets but loves hands-on type stuff. He's extremely smart, but gets bored sooooo easily. He's a follower and a fighter (two traits he picked up in the short time he was in public school).

DD is 3. She is very easy-going. Does what you ask her to, sits and colors for hours if you let her and her brothers leave her alone. She is always happy (unless someone messes with her). She doesn't talk and we are about to begin speech therapy for her. She grunts and we understand. She also knows a good big of sign language. She likes to match things and draw things.

DS is 2 and he is a handful. He's a wild child and makes life difficult LOL. He is the child you see on the playground always trying to run into the street and not play on the equipment. He thinks it's hilarious. He screams bloody murder in libraries and museums. He's a sweet kid - just too active for his own good LOL. It doesn't help that his brother thinks it's hilarious when he is doing something he shouldn't.

DS is almost 9 months and attached to the breast about 90% of our day (minus in the car) LOL. He is a sweet baby, rarely cries so long as he is being carried. Not much of a problem - well, except for sleep deprivation LOL.


We have been doing workbooks with DS5 and coloring sheets for them all (minus the baby). I just don't know what to really do - if there is a better pre-packaged thing for them all kind of deal? How to get me motivated to get off my butt and get to work with their schooling.

I know the only one who needs to do schoolwork is DS5 but the others just want to do what he does. DS5 really does want to learn.

DH is dylexic but won't admit it (although his mom says he was diagnosed as a child) and I worry that DS will be too.
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Old 10-24-2008, 12:23 PM
 
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It sounds like you are looking for some group activities, plus additional, age appropriate stuff for the 5 year old? Starfall.com has some free printables for letters, ect. That's something that all 3 could do. Another group thing is history is you use something like Story of the World- it's a read-a-loud.
You could get DS started with K work at the same time- and what you pick is based on where DS is academically, if you are religious, what type of learning you are into as a family.
You might want to work in some gentle math- like Singapore Earlybird, or Saxon, or Math-U-See. And phonics if he's not a reader yet.

To my husband I am wife, to my kids I am mother, but for myself I am just me.
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Old 10-24-2008, 03:13 PM
 
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For all of them I wouldn't stress about worksheets. If they ask for some, go for it, but there's no real need for excessive academics at that age. Let them explore the world and be creative.

You mentioned your 5yo likes hands-on stuff. That's normal for most young kids IMO, so go with that. They learn better through experience than through worksheets. If you want to go for packaged programs, look for ones with tons of hands-on and manipulatives. RightStart math is my favourite right now -- I'm even switching my 10yo into it now, after he's finished grade 6 Teaching Textbooks (which he loved) and started pre-algebra, because the pre-algebra is just too 'dry'. He's VERY hands-on and the abacus, balance, blocks, drawing tools, 3-d geometric shapes etc etc etc are going to work MUCH better for him.

I'm planning to use RS for DD when she's old enough, probably around 4.5 or 5.

Right now she's almost 2, and I've been incorporating quite a bit of Montessori-inspired activities for her. She loves the orderliness of it. It's an age where they love finding order and patterns, matching and sorting. Also a big age for independence -- she wants to dress herself, brush her own teeth, wash her own face, help in the kitchen, help with the laundry, so we find ways to facilitate that for her. One of the main Montessori tenets is "help me do it by myself".

Anyway, some food for thought for ya!

Heather, mom to Caileigh 12/06 and aspie ADHD prodigy David 05/98 :intact lact
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Old 10-24-2008, 03:35 PM
 
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Even the 5yo doesn't "need" to do workbooks or formal schoolwork. If he enjoys the worksheets, then go ahead and give him some to do, but I wouldn't stress about formal academics in kindergarten. I don't think you really need to "get off your butt and get involved with their schooling"- I think little kids learn best when given lots of interesting things to play with and explore.

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18 (commuting to college), and Jack, 13(homeschooled)
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Old 10-24-2008, 04:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruthla View Post
Even the 5yo doesn't "need" to do workbooks or formal schoolwork. If he enjoys the worksheets, then go ahead and give him some to do, but I wouldn't stress about formal academics in kindergarten. I don't think you really need to "get off your butt and get involved with their schooling"- I think little kids learn best when given lots of interesting things to play with and explore.
I was sitting here drumming my fingers and trying to find words to say exactly that.

What you can do, though, is just keep busy providing an environment that encourages lots of imaginative play - cloths and props for making forts and playhouses, a play store area with empty containers and a little cash register with play money, sand with little play people and animals, poster paints readily at hand with easels, homemade finger paints, good videos, an ongoing fresh supply of homemade playdough, a craft table with lots of things to glue together and glitter and stuff, occasionally provide homemade bubbles and things to blow them through, soft clay they can build with, stacks of wonderful picture books of all kinds, blocks and little play people and things to make imaginative scenes with (you can even make some out of small paper-covered boxes, cardboard boxes to make things out of with your help, all sorts of costume props (hats, capes, gowns, etc.) arranged on hooks for neat and easy access, chalk for drawing on the driveway and a blackboard, take little nature walks and talk with them about interesting things you see, plant seeds and bulbs together to care for and watch (you could even make large tags with the plant pictures and names on them) and so forth... You can gradually incorporate written words into lots of things, as well as simple math thinking, counting, change making, etc. There are lots and lots of ideas on my (non-commercial) preschool/kidergarten page - be sure to look down underneath the list of links to articles to find links to websites that have fun ideas.

Just have fun - the learning will all work itself out. But I'm not giving you a pass to not get up and active. - Lillian
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