Pelvic Floor Party: Kegels are NOT invited - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 05-16-2012, 08:14 AM
 
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I found the katysays blog during my recent pregnancy and had tried to start squatting more but if I try to do it for any length of time my feet start to fall asleep. And once I get up out of the squat my knees and lower legs are kind of sore. Plus it was hard to do with a pregnanty belly. Getting ready to TTC soon though and I want to make sure to start squatting now so I'm good at it by the time my belly gets big again. Does anyone else have problems with their legs/feet falling asleep or sore knees? Does this mean I'm doing it wrong? Thanks!
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Old 05-16-2012, 08:57 AM
 
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I noticed this thread is sort of old but I felt compelled to discuss the pure physics of the bodily structure in a squat. People seem to think there is something magical about "the right way to squat" but in truth the physics of a squat have to do with available range of motion at the ankles, knees and hips, i.e. flexibility AND the proportions of your lower leg to your thigh to your torso and its center of mass (which obviously changes when pregnant). Having your center of mass more forward should allow you to stick your butt out more, it's all about maintaining your center of mass over your base, i.e. your feet. The challenge of this in a squat is front to back, not side to side.

The issue of having your feet turned out or not has to do with the lever length of thighs to lower leg and torso. If you look at a person squatting from the side you'll be able to see this: if their feet are pointing straight forward their butt will have to go further back if their thighs are very long in comparison to their lower leg and torso, most likely this will push the center of mass back past the heels and that's why people topple over backwards. If they turn their feet out a bit the thighs will travel forward but also sideways and the butt will not stick out as much, thus maintaining the center of mass over the base.

As to lordosis in end range of motion of a squat: I don't know of anyone who has that much hipflexion that they can avoid lordosis, i.e. letting the tailbone tuck in at the end (when sitting all the way down with your butt on your heels) is normal.

Lastly, to address the original question of whether squats are effective in rebuilding? I haven't specifically studied that. I can't say whether it is essential for everybody to be able to squat either. It makes sense to me that it sort of lines everything up to give birth from an anatomical point of view.


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Old 10-12-2012, 12:13 AM
 
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Alaaj, That sort of answers it. I really wanted more detailed steps but, perhaps, if I did those exercises regularly I'd be able to squat like she says is the best way to do it. It seems like she said she had a video that gave more details. Perhaps I'd need that to really grasp it.


Random, just hold on to something as you squat down. Go down as far as you can. Over time, you will be able to squat perfectly - without holding on to anything.

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Old 10-12-2012, 01:17 AM
 
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Originally Posted by dakipode View Post

I noticed this thread is sort of old but I felt compelled to discuss the pure physics of the bodily structure in a squat. People seem to think there is something magical about "the right way to squat" but in truth the physics of a squat have to do with available range of motion at the ankles, knees and hips, i.e. flexibility AND the proportions of your lower leg to your thigh to your torso and its center of mass (which obviously changes when pregnant). Having your center of mass more forward should allow you to stick your butt out more, it's all about maintaining your center of mass over your base, i.e. your feet. The challenge of this in a squat is front to back, not side to side.

The issue of having your feet turned out or not has to do with the lever length of thighs to lower leg and torso. If you look at a person squatting from the side you'll be able to see this: if their feet are pointing straight forward their butt will have to go further back if their thighs are very long in comparison to their lower leg and torso, most likely this will push the center of mass back past the heels and that's why people topple over backwards. If they turn their feet out a bit the thighs will travel forward but also sideways and the butt will not stick out as much, thus maintaining the center of mass over the base.

As to lordosis in end range of motion of a squat: I don't know of anyone who has that much hipflexion that they can avoid lordosis, i.e. letting the tailbone tuck in at the end (when sitting all the way down with your butt on your heels) is normal.

Lastly, to address the original question of whether squats are effective in rebuilding? I haven't specifically studied that. I can't say whether it is essential for everybody to be able to squat either. It makes sense to me that it sort of lines everything up to give birth from an anatomical point of view.


Thank you. This type of thing is exactly what I was looking for.

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Old 10-12-2012, 01:18 AM
 
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Random, just hold on to something as you squat down. Go down as far as you can. Over time, you will be able to squat perfectly - without holding on to anything.


Thanks, but dakipode answered it better. No offense or anything.

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Old 10-24-2012, 11:10 AM
 
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If your hip joints are in good shape and there is no groin pain in a deep parallel squat, this is a wonderful exercise - especially for the arches of the feet. 

 

However, a squat with full lumbar curvature is really the same exercise as sitting on a firm chair seat with full lumbar curvature, except for the additional resistance created by flexed hips and knees throughout the back myofascial line - which includes the pelvic wall. Squatting in this way is great, but it addresses only one piece of the pelvic organ support system!

 

It is crucial that women understand their true pelvic anatomy, which has never been taught by gynecology, PT, or Katy!

 

Please have a look at what I am calling The New Kegel, as well as another description of simple anatomical concepts that we must understand to maintain pelvic organ support for a lifetime:

 

http://wholewoman.com/blog/

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Old 12-26-2012, 07:57 AM
 
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Christine, thank you for that information. I found it very useful.
 

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Old 03-07-2013, 02:00 PM
 
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Hi Italia,

 

What a funny photo (I'm asian we jokingly call this a "fob squat") anyway it kind of reminds me of frog pose in yoga. If you do try it, its a totally different feeling when you just squat and sit your butt low than when you squat like this and then focus on lifting your pelvic floor up. Youll not only feel it in your legs but internally as well- so if you do try it I would focus on sitting low but also lifting up your pelvic floor and NOT sinking in the squat in a lazy way. Its a totally different feeling, and I think it is much more effective for this kind of issue
 


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Old 04-21-2013, 12:53 AM
 
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Katy has an online program called No More Kegels that has really thorough information about pelvic floor, factors that contribute to pelvic floor disorder and a series of exercises that prepare people to do a full squat with the alignment parameters that Katy recommends. http://www.restorativeexercise.com/no-more-kegels/

 

One of the things that most people don't realize is how much preparation work is required to achieve an aligned squat. Because we sit so much, because our feet our so stiff from wearing shoes, because our lower legs have so much tension in them, there is a huge amount of prep work required to execute a squate. I find there's a huge difference between sitting in a chair with full lumbar curvature and a squat using Katy's alignment parameters (which I'm still very much working on achieving).


Lisa , married to Dan, mama to IVF miracle Natalie 5/20/09 :
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