Pelvic Organ Prolapse, Support Thread - Page 10 - Mothering Forums
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Healing Birth Trauma > Pelvic Organ Prolapse, Support Thread
happy2bamama's Avatar happy2bamama 05:45 PM 12-14-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicoley73 View Post
The reason people say that uterine prolapse can only be helped by surgery is that the uterus is suspended by ligaments. When it's prolapsed it's because the ligaments are stretched or torn, and conventional theory is that ligaments can't be tightened/repaired through therapy. Think of all of the ACL surgeries...
Ah, thanks for explaining that to me. I guess it does make some sense even though I wish it didn't. I still think that pelvic floor exercises HAVE to help since they are the muscles surrounding (and supporting) the uterus and other pelvic organs, but I can also see how it wouldn't really fix the whole situation. If your pelvic floor muscles are super toned, but your ligaments are still weak or torn, there's still going to be a pressure of some kind. Mmmm, makes me wonder if I should continue to pay for Pilates twice a week (which is not really affordable for us right now), when I could be doing kegels at home.

I keep holding out for things to get better once I stop nursing. I know it's probably wishful thinking, but wouldn't it be great if once I stopped nursing, my ligaments and muscles firmed up enough to make the prolapse unnoticeable?! I should light a vigil.

nicoley73's Avatar nicoley73 07:26 PM 12-14-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by happy2bamama View Post
Ah, thanks for explaining that to me. I guess it does make some sense even though I wish it didn't. I still think that pelvic floor exercises HAVE to help since they are the muscles surrounding (and supporting) the uterus and other pelvic organs, but I can also see how it wouldn't really fix the whole situation. If your pelvic floor muscles are super toned, but your ligaments are still weak or torn, there's still going to be a pressure of some kind. Mmmm, makes me wonder if I should continue to pay for Pilates twice a week (which is not really affordable for us right now), when I could be doing kegels at home.

I keep holding out for things to get better once I stop nursing. I know it's probably wishful thinking, but wouldn't it be great if once I stopped nursing, my ligaments and muscles firmed up enough to make the prolapse unnoticeable?! I should light a vigil.
I definitely think the exercises help even for uterine prolapse. I know they helped me. In some cases they just might not help enough, you know?

Weaning could make a big difference, especially if you haven't gotten your period back. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you. I'm in the opposite place - I feel pretty good now, but worry that once I wean I'll feel worse. I'm sort of waiting for the other shoe to drop.
mamamoo's Avatar mamamoo 10:09 PM 12-14-2007
ok, so here is a question...has this been talked about before? What about orgasm? My prolapse was feeling better for a while, then I got a cough and it is not so great again, and everytime I am climaxing(I know way tmi) I can feel it. Totally sucks!! Is this making it worse? Should I be doing something to prevent that? Anyone know?
happy2bamama's Avatar happy2bamama 01:58 AM 12-15-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by nicoley73 View Post
I definitely think the exercises help even for uterine prolapse. I know they helped me. In some cases they just might not help enough, you know?

Weaning could make a big difference, especially if you haven't gotten your period back. I'll keep my fingers crossed for you. I'm in the opposite place - I feel pretty good now, but worry that once I wean I'll feel worse. I'm sort of waiting for the other shoe to drop.
Yeah, I think you're right. The exercises can help, but it just depends on how severe the prolapse is. And, I was thinking, unless a doctor cut us open and went in and looked at the ligaments holding our uteri (awesome - the plural of uterus), there is no way to know if the prolapse is due to torn/strained ligaments or if it's an issue with the pelvic floor muslces. So I guess the best thing to do is to try the exercises and if there is relief, great and perhaps that means it was just due to weak muscles, but if the exercises don't help, perhaps it really is a ligament thing and then surgery might be a viable option (although I know it has mixed reviews).

I'm curious - why do you think that you'll feel worse after you wean? Also, does the fact that I haven't gotten my period back yet play a role in this and if so, how?

Quote:
Originally Posted by mamamoo View Post
ok, so here is a question...has this been talked about before? What about orgasm? My prolapse was feeling better for a while, then I got a cough and it is not so great again, and everytime I am climaxing(I know way tmi) I can feel it. Totally sucks!! Is this making it worse? Should I be doing something to prevent that? Anyone know?
Sadly, I don't have an answer for you about the climaxing because there has been a SERIOUS drought here due to the fact that DS does not stop moving and I want to do nothing (not even that) after he goes to bed! Hopefully someone who has read some of those books will chime in with some help.
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 02:19 AM 12-15-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by mamamoo View Post
ok, so here is a question...has this been talked about before? What about orgasm? My prolapse was feeling better for a while, then I got a cough and it is not so great again, and everytime I am climaxing(I know way tmi) I can feel it. Totally sucks!! Is this making it worse? Should I be doing something to prevent that? Anyone know?
I haven't noticed a problem -- I'll try to pay attention next time but I can't make any promises!
nicoley73's Avatar nicoley73 11:31 AM 12-15-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by happy2bamama View Post
I'm curious - why do you think that you'll feel worse after you wean? Also, does the fact that I haven't gotten my period back yet play a role in this and if so, how?
Oh, it's just anxiety - not based on anything real - because I feel okay now, I worry that any change could make me feel prolapse-y again.

Just getting your period back may make you feel better - breastfeeding puts you in a low-estrogen state, which makes the vaginal tissues thinner, but I think when your cycle returns your hormone levels are a lot closer to normal.
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 03:51 AM 12-16-2007
I need some support. I'm feeling really bad, psychologically, about my prolapses right now, maybe the worst I've felt so far. I checked a book out of the library on pelvic floor health written by a surgeon, and I should have stopped reading it in the introduction when he said (1) it wasn't a book that would tell the reader that everything was going to be all right, because pelvic organ prolapse is a serious condition, and (2) women really ought to at least consider elective C-section births to save their pelvic health.

I won't even tell you the name of the book, because no one should read it. My husband told me to stop reading it as soon as he saw the stricken look on my face, but I didn't listen to him. On the plus side, those with bladder prolapse and/or urinary incontinence will be glad to hear that Mr. Surgeon thinks exercises can do a world of good. Unfortunately he thinks that surgery is the only way to fix a uterine prolapse. There are some detailed descriptions of the various surgical options, complete with illustrations, and fairly grim warnings that no surgical option is perfect.

To let you know how rattled I am by this book, I actually started considering elective C-section for my next birth. That's a far cry from the homebirth I had been envisioning. But I don't want to have a hysterectomy, especially in my early 40s, and I don't want to end up with even worse prolapse than I already have. I don't want to reach the point where I have to stuff my uterus back into my body before I can sit down.

Sigh. Is there anyone on this thread now who still has more than a mild uterine prolapse (I'm between stage 1 and 2) several years postpartum (I'm two years)? Is there anyone who has been able to nonsurgically improve their uterine prolapse at such a late stage in the game? Oh, I need some hugs or something.
dantesmama's Avatar dantesmama 05:22 AM 12-16-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicole R. View Post
I need some support. I'm feeling really bad, psychologically, about my prolapses right now, maybe the worst I've felt so far. I checked a book out of the library on pelvic floor health written by a surgeon, and I should have stopped reading it in the introduction when he said (1) it wasn't a book that would tell the reader that everything was going to be all right, because pelvic organ prolapse is a serious condition, and (2) women really ought to at least consider elective C-section births to save their pelvic health.

I won't even tell you the name of the book, because no one should read it. My husband told me to stop reading it as soon as he saw the stricken look on my face, but I didn't listen to him. On the plus side, those with bladder prolapse and/or urinary incontinence will be glad to hear that Mr. Surgeon thinks exercises can do a world of good. Unfortunately he thinks that surgery is the only way to fix a uterine prolapse. There are some detailed descriptions of the various surgical options, complete with illustrations, and fairly grim warnings that no surgical option is perfect.

To let you know how rattled I am by this book, I actually started considering elective C-section for my next birth. That's a far cry from the homebirth I had been envisioning. But I don't want to have a hysterectomy, especially in my early 40s, and I don't want to end up with even worse prolapse than I already have. I don't want to reach the point where I have to stuff my uterus back into my body before I can sit down.

Sigh. Is there anyone on this thread now who still has more than a mild uterine prolapse (I'm between stage 1 and 2) several years postpartum (I'm two years)? Is there anyone who has been able to nonsurgically improve their uterine prolapse at such a late stage in the game? Oh, I need some hugs or something.
Can't help you with the last part - I have a grade 1, 4 months postpartum. But I can help with the hugs.

To the surgeon who wrote that book - A "serious condition"? Prolapse is incredibly common. IMO him having his head up his @$$ is a "serious condition" too, and no surgery is going to correct that. Gah. I mean, yeah, if your uterus is hanging out of your vagina, then I'd probably agree that everything isn't going to be all right. But most women don't have that degree of prolapse. And to tell women they should have ELECTIVE C-SECTIONS? Please don't get me started! What a UA violation.

When I first discovered my prolapse, I was envisioning a future with c-sections, surgery, hysterectomy, or "stuffing my uterus back into my body so I could sit down" (I swear to you, I had the same mental image). And it was really, really depressing. But chances are, it's not going to be nearly that bad. I fully intend to have more children, and to birth them as I see fit - which will probably be at home, unassisted, again. Next time I will hire a postpartum doula to take care of things around the house, so I can stay in bed and rest as much as possible, instead of carrying loads of laundry and standing at the sink 3 days postpartum. I have faith that things will be okay . . . mainly because I have no other option. I have a prolapsed uterus and bladder, and that's not going to change. I know that surgery may be in the picture years down the road - I'm only in my twenties - but I'll drive myself nuts if I worry about that now.

Please, please, please return that book to the library and put it out of your mind! (But before you do, write the Whole Woman web address right on the introductory page for the next woman who reads it.)
nicoley73's Avatar nicoley73 12:28 PM 12-16-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nicole R. View Post
I need some support. I'm feeling really bad, psychologically, about my prolapses right now, maybe the worst I've felt so far. I checked a book out of the library on pelvic floor health written by a surgeon, and I should have stopped reading it in the introduction when he said (1) it wasn't a book that would tell the reader that everything was going to be all right, because pelvic organ prolapse is a serious condition, and (2) women really ought to at least consider elective C-section births to save their pelvic health.

I won't even tell you the name of the book, because no one should read it. My husband told me to stop reading it as soon as he saw the stricken look on my face, but I didn't listen to him. On the plus side, those with bladder prolapse and/or urinary incontinence will be glad to hear that Mr. Surgeon thinks exercises can do a world of good. Unfortunately he thinks that surgery is the only way to fix a uterine prolapse. There are some detailed descriptions of the various surgical options, complete with illustrations, and fairly grim warnings that no surgical option is perfect.

To let you know how rattled I am by this book, I actually started considering elective C-section for my next birth. That's a far cry from the homebirth I had been envisioning. But I don't want to have a hysterectomy, especially in my early 40s, and I don't want to end up with even worse prolapse than I already have. I don't want to reach the point where I have to stuff my uterus back into my body before I can sit down.

Sigh. Is there anyone on this thread now who still has more than a mild uterine prolapse (I'm between stage 1 and 2) several years postpartum (I'm two years)? Is there anyone who has been able to nonsurgically improve their uterine prolapse at such a late stage in the game? Oh, I need some hugs or something.


My husband banned me from the internet when I was first diagnosed because I kept reading horror stories of failed surgeries and other stuff and would just cry uncontrollably. I think it's good to educate yourself on both surgical and non-surgical options, but it might be too soon and too emotional right now.

Your prolapse might get worse with your next pregnancy and delivery. It might not. With my second pregnancy I needed to be prepared for the worst and hope for the best. I had a 10lb4oz baby and my prolapse did not get worse (ultimately - even though at 2 wks pp my cervix was coming out my vagina.) Somehow I healed, and even though it was horrifying at the time, for some reason I wasn't completely devastated - maybe because I had mentally prepared for it.

A c-section is no guarantee that you won't still worsen, because the weight of the pregnancy puts a lot of pressure on the pelvic floor. For me, it wasn't worth the chance that I would have had abdominal surgery and still have prolapsed further - I was willing to put faith in my body to deliver babies vaginally.

Oh, and you never need to have a hysterectomy. You can get your uterus re-suspended. A lot of surgeons are now realizing that this is the way to go. If I ever have surgery I will not let them take my uterus.

This sucks. But you are not aone.
wombatclay's Avatar wombatclay 02:26 PM 12-16-2007
HUGE hugs mama. Hang in there.

just so you know where I'm coming from- I had a c/s with my first, a vbac with my second. My vbac was amazing but ended in shoulder dystocia and a 4th degree tear with almost an hour of suturing without pain coverage (the single most horrific experience of my life, everyone was really apologetic but the only meds I could use left huge windows of full sensitivity and the suturing had to be done). I am now 6months post partum with a healing tear, a "just shy of 2" bladder prolapse, and a uterine prolapse at a "1 and a bit". The emotional high of my vbac buffered me a bit but the first few months were really hard. I couldn't believe my body had "failed" me again! The current medical thought is "once a 4th degree, always a c/s" AND "once a sd always a c/s" so I'm dealing with that mindset on more fronts too and have been thinking about this a lot.

My current feeling is that in terms of prolapse the "damage" is done by the weight of the developing babe and the hormonally triggered loosening of tissue. Although the manner of delivery certainly has an impact, I feel like the pregnancy itself (instead of the birth) is where the real "problem" lies. So I'm going to do what I can to be in peak fitness before my next pregnancy. I'll lose the weight, strengthen and tone muscles, and work on a balanced flexibility. During pregnancy I'll go with swimming and water exercise to stay in shape and also give those muscles/ligaments a rest. I'll also use the "Materal Fitness" plan (the mummy tummy author) which teaches how to work with pushing contractions while protecting your pelvic floor, and I'll do hypnobabies again to help with breathing out the babe. During the birth I'll labor in water and consider an epidural late in labor to allow my body to do as much as possible without "effort" (laboring down...some mamas can do this without meds, but I've learned my body PUSHES no matter what I do so epi might be an option). After the birth I'll be much more careful about resting and healing, I'll start with homeopathic treatments, acupuncture, etc sooner (I'll bidget for them before the birth) and I'll be much more aware of pelvic floor health.

I guess I'm coming to terms with the fact that I don't have any control over birth but I don't think a scheduled c/s is going to "solve" anything though. Personally I blame my c/s for the bladder prolapse since in a c/s the bladder is "removed" so the surgeon can reach the uterus and then "reattached" after the uterus is sutured. Ummmm...yeah. I'm sure that had nothing to do with my bladder support loosening up! So anyway, a c/s is pretty rough on those pelvic muscles/ligaments and I don't see how it would really solve anything in terms of prolapse.

And pps are right...this is such a common problem, and women today are MUCH more confident/comfortable telling doctors what they need (as in, women aren't willing to say "oh ok, this is just normal and I'm not going to ask for help or look for a solution")... so new techniques and treatments are on the way.

Hugs mama, healing is happening.
happy2bamama's Avatar happy2bamama 04:20 AM 12-17-2007
The weirdest thing is happening to me today - I am sort of feeling "over" the whole prolapse thing (as if I can just will it to go away!), especially after realizing that exercises can't really help the tendons heal (if they're even part of the problem), so today I didn't really focus on it nor was I religious about the Pilates form that I'm always spouting about here and ya know what, it feels better. I don't understand because I actually feel myself letting go physically - today I've let my stomach bulge out more rather than scooping it up and tightening it every time I think about it. Hmmm... I'm a bit puzzled. I'm sure whatever's going on won't last and tomorrow or the next day I'll have a whole new feeling (good or bad), but it makes me wonder if not focusing on it so intently could be a good thing.
lula's Avatar lula 06:21 AM 12-17-2007
I think every woman with prolapse needs a hug on occasion! (at least I sure do!)

My dh has banned my from "looking" on a daily basis. I was becoming more than a little obsessed and am taking a break from the prolapse examining over the holidays...who would have thought that I would ever being saying such a thing!

Honestly, this thread is really the only thing that is helping me at the moment, the more I research the more depressed I get but actually "talking" to other women really helps.
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 08:16 PM 12-17-2007


Thanks, dantesmama, nicoley73, wombatclay, everyone. You guys rock. I needed that. And even though it goes against my training (I'm a librarian!) I think I will write the Whole Woman Web site address in the front of the book.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nicoley73 View Post
Your prolapse might get worse with your next pregnancy and delivery. It might not. With my second pregnancy I needed to be prepared for the worst and hope for the best. I had a 10lb4oz baby and my prolapse did not get worse (ultimately - even though at 2 wks pp my cervix was coming out my vagina.) Somehow I healed, and even though it was horrifying at the time, for some reason I wasn't completely devastated - maybe because I had mentally prepared for it.

A c-section is no guarantee that you won't still worsen, because the weight of the pregnancy puts a lot of pressure on the pelvic floor. For me, it wasn't worth the chance that I would have had abdominal surgery and still have prolapsed further - I was willing to put faith in my body to deliver babies vaginally.
Thanks for the reminder. I KNOW all that, but I clearly needed to hear it again anyway. This is a great example of the need to surround yourself with POSITIVE childbirth messages.

The guy who wrote this book specifically warns about a long pushing stage as a factor in pelvic floor damage -- but I myself only pushed for 30 minutes! So what does he know? Maybe my prolapse will get worse, or maybe it won't. (According to WebMD, it isn't always "progressive.") Either way, the chances are that it will be the pregnancy rather than the delivery that does the damage, as you point out.

(It was 30 minutes of OB-directed pushing on my back, however -- and I pushed HARD. I'll try to avoid that next time!)

And if, according to the book, I'm bound for prolapse surgery sometime in my future anyway, why have a C-section now, with all its dangers to both mama and babe? That's TWICE as much abdominal surgery. Oh, wait -- the book was written by a surgeon.
wombatclay's Avatar wombatclay 08:21 PM 12-17-2007
I'm a librarian too.

It's not prolapse, but for shoulder dystocia one "risk factor" is prolonged pushing while another "risk factor" is a precipitous second stage (so, short pushing stage). Sort of a damnd if you do, damned if you don't scenario! Sometimes I think the med pros are just trying to cover all the bases. Not the best way to "do" science.
APinkRN's Avatar APinkRN 08:50 PM 12-17-2007
I too have falling organs. I thought it was just a recto. until I was pushing with a patient (I'm a L&D RN) and my Nuvaring kept coming "down". I excused myself twice in a 45 min period or so and finally took it out. Saw my midwife the next day who told me it's all coming down and out. Blagh.

The first thing she told me to do was start PT with a local pelvic floor specialist. We moved shortly thereafter and I never went to see her. If anyone would like, I'd be happy to get in touch with the PT and ask her what she thinks about various methods that you all have discussed. She is a friend of mine.

I know that most of my problems come from constipation issues that have plagued me since I was young.

I started Kegels a few months ago after I felt my bladder on my vaginal wall while coughing. Man. If that won't get you going with Kegels I don't know what will.

I think eventually I'll have to have a A&P repair. Honestly, this issue can just be plain gross and embarassing at times. I thought I was doing better but things seem to be falling more than I expected, mainly my bladder.

I have also worked in an OB/Midwife office, and I can tell you that plenty of elderly women have pesseries and do well. The biggest side effect is an increase in vaginal discharge.

Glad to be here! Glad to meet others who are in the some position!

Amy
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 12:22 AM 12-18-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by APinkRN View Post
I too have falling organs. I thought it was just a recto. until I was pushing with a patient (I'm a L&D RN) and my Nuvaring kept coming "down". I excused myself twice in a 45 min period or so and finally took it out. Saw my midwife the next day who told me it's all coming down and out. Blagh.

The first thing she told me to do was start PT with a local pelvic floor specialist. We moved shortly thereafter and I never went to see her. If anyone would like, I'd be happy to get in touch with the PT and ask her what she thinks about various methods that you all have discussed. She is a friend of mine.

I know that most of my problems come from constipation issues that have plagued me since I was young.


I started Kegels a few months ago after I felt my bladder on my vaginal wall while coughing. Man. If that won't get you going with Kegels I don't know what will.

I think eventually I'll have to have a A&P repair. Honestly, this issue can just be plain gross and embarassing at times. I thought I was doing better but things seem to be falling more than I expected, mainly my bladder.

I have also worked in an OB/Midwife office, and I can tell you that plenty of elderly women have pesseries and do well. The biggest side effect is an increase in vaginal discharge.

Glad to be here! Glad to meet others who are in the some position!

Amy
Hey, welcome! I'm not "glad" you HAVE to be here, and but I'm glad you ARE here, if you know what I mean. It does feel "gross and embarrassing," doesn't it? The more I talk about it, though, the better I feel.

I was interested to hear what you said about constipation. I was super constipated while I was pregnant, and I never realized how harmful it could be. They tell you to "avoid" it, but not WHY you should! Not only did it leave me with hemorrhoids (which never go away -- wish someone had told me about them, too) and an anal fissure (for which I had to have a colonoscopy ), I guess all the straining while under the influence of relaxing pregnancy hormones caused my poor uterine ligaments to stretch out. That's my new theory, anyway.

Now I'm on the bran / prune juice / apple sauce recipe that someone suggested earlier in this thread ...

Speaking of pessaries, I read something on WebMD today that suggested that a properly fitted pessary can prevent a prolapse from worsening, because it holds up some of the weight -- I guess things don't get more stretched out. (Like wearing a bra, perhaps?) But a poorly fitted one can cause your vaginal walls to erode, making rectal prolapse more likely. Anyone have any experience with a pessary, good or bad? I think maybe I'll look into one for my first trimester (once I'm pregnant, that is).
APinkRN's Avatar APinkRN 10:41 AM 12-18-2007
Speaking of pessaries, I read something on WebMD today that suggested that a properly fitted pessary can prevent a prolapse from worsening, because it holds up some of the weight -- I guess things don't get more stretched out. (Like wearing a bra, perhaps?) But a poorly fitted one can cause your vaginal walls to erode, making rectal prolapse more likely. Anyone have any experience with a pessary, good or bad? I think maybe I'll l
look into one for my first trimester (once I'm pregnant, that is).


I keep in touch with my midwife and I'd be happy to ask her about the pessary issue. It would make sense that a good fit is essential and I'm sure you'd need to have it checked after delivery, if you wanted to keep wearing it.

At work the other night, I was reading one of the new OB/GYN mags out. There is something new that is being advertised as a device that "Supports while strengthening". From how it was described, this is going to be the new BIG thing in pelvic floor issues.

Let me ask around and see what I can find out. I also work Friday night and I'll ask one of the MDs what they think. We don't have midwives at my new job, and it's rough some/most times. A good midwife is a treasure.

With my second baby, after an impaction at 15 weeks that I removed myself right before my husband's Christmas party (!!!!!!!), I started taking Colace. Bran, this and that just didn't stand a chance against my super colon and prenatals.

No one really talks about how constipation can really take a toll on your lower half. I know my two hours of pushing didn't cause all this to happen.

I would encourage everyone to make sure they are doing Kegels the right way. Sounds crazy, but plenty of people tighten their bottoms instead of their pelvic floor. When you are urinating, stop and start your flow of urine and few times. Practice Kegels like this until you get a good idea as to the sensation, what muscles you are using, etc.

I'll ask about the Pessary for you, OK?
dantesmama's Avatar dantesmama 04:52 AM 12-20-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by APinkRN View Post
I would encourage everyone to make sure they are doing Kegels the right way. Sounds crazy, but plenty of people tighten their bottoms instead of their pelvic floor. When you are urinating, stop and start your flow of urine and few times. Practice Kegels like this until you get a good idea as to the sensation, what muscles you are using, etc.

I'll ask about the Pessary for you, OK?
It also helps to practice kegels with a finger or two in your vagina - it can help you to zero in on the specific muscles you're tightening.
~*max*~'s Avatar ~*max*~ 07:43 PM 12-20-2007
Just wanted to share some good news - I just got back from an apt. w/my GYN. I was thinking we would be discussing surgery options, but to my surprise she said she thought my uterus had moved way up & looked great! She said I could continue on like this for another 10 years w/out the need for surgery. I am so relieved. I attribute the progress to changing estrogen levels due to weaning, Mayan Uterine Massage, and the Whole Woman Posture & exercises.

I just wanted to share so others know that progress is possible.

Hugs to everyone struggling with this. This thread has been a great help & support to me.
wombatclay's Avatar wombatclay 07:55 PM 12-20-2007
Yay max! What great news! Like a very odd holiday gift from your inner bits.

Glad there is good news (and hope for us all).
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 12:01 AM 12-21-2007
Hooray, Max! So great to hear! You've worked hard; you earned it.

My physical therapy with a woman who specifically does pelvic floor rehabilitation (8 appointments) starts mid-January, and I have a recommendation for a good Pilates trainer with pelvic floor experience. So I'm ready to start working hard too (just as soon as the holidays are over ).
dantesmama's Avatar dantesmama 05:21 AM 12-22-2007
That's great news, Max!

I've been feeling my prolapse a lot the last few days. I've been on my feet a lot, carrying the baby constantly, and dealing with a huge amount of stress. And a cold, with all the coughing, sneezing, and nose-blowing that goes along with it. Blech. My bladder had gone back up quite a bit, which I was psyched about, but now it's pressing into my anterior vaginal wall again. It isn't "feeling" it that bothers me as much as "knowing" it, you know?

Good luck with the PT, Nicole!
xelakann's Avatar xelakann 09:35 PM 12-23-2007
I see a lot of women here have bladder prolapses... I had a cervix prolapse. Anyone else?

I pushed for 5 hours, my mw's were very hands off, so they weren't coaching me to push that long or anything. It just took him forever to move down.

Anyway... right after he came out I started having major pain (different than the labor pain, which was major too). Since this was my first birth, I thought it was normal.

I took me a VERY long time to push out the placenta and I had a lot of pain with that too, again I thought it was normal to feel that kind of pain.

When my MW's checked me they got very serious after seeing this unusual thing hanging out of me. They called in another MW from their practice to look at it and determine what to do about it.

They basically just shoved it back up and said it should heal on it own. Though I am concerned whether or not that is true. I've read online where women get surgery for that kind of thing.

I find out at my next appointment (the 6 weeker) if I am healed.

Just curious if anyone else has dealt with this. I read most of the posts... but I admit not all of them.
Kiddoson's Avatar Kiddoson 10:20 PM 12-23-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by xelakann View Post
I see a lot of women here have bladder prolapses... I had a cervix prolapse. Anyone else?
Well I never had bladder problems so I think mine was cervix. It was border line coming out but I didn't notice til 1 week PP cause I lost a lot of blood and spent most my time on the couch. Now @ almost 5 months I feel pretty normal, once in a while I feel it low and when I have a bowel movement but otherwise it doesn't bother me much now.

BTW to everyone else: I am STILL having pain with bowel movement (no pain any other time) what's up with that? When will it stop?
thanks
threadbey's Avatar threadbey 01:25 PM 12-26-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by xelakann View Post
I see a lot of women here have bladder prolapses... I had a cervix prolapse. Anyone else?
total cervix prolapse, here. it's gotten MUCH better since delivery, but i have been avoiding making a follow up appointment with my mw (even though i want a pt referral) because i don't really want to know "objectively" how things are!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Kiddoson View Post
Now @ almost 5 months I feel pretty normal, once in a while I feel it low and when I have a bowel movement but otherwise it doesn't bother me much now.

BTW to everyone else: I am STILL having pain with bowel movement (no pain any other time) what's up with that? When will it stop?
thanks
the bowel issues are what's still bugging/worrying me even though they're not hugely interfering with my life. i do feel vaginal pressure when having a bowel movement, even though i am almost always very regular and hardly push if at all. i also have pain sometimes and occasionally a little bleeding, but i had just assumed this was hemorrhoids and a separate issue from the prolapse (and it's gotten a lot better in the past two months or so).

anyone else out there mostly feeling ok for now, but frequently worried about later in life? i.e. i don't want surgery in 10 years!!! or ever! but i also don't want to have a leaky bladder/bowl in my mid and later life! and i'd like to keep my uterus! and i might want another child! AND i don't like to talk about any of it with anyone, because if they've heard of prolapse they're sure i need surgery and if they haven't they're freaked out.

hrmph.

trying to be zen and calm about it all.
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 02:03 AM 12-31-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by threadbey View Post
the bowel issues are what's still bugging/worrying me even though they're not hugely interfering with my life. i do feel vaginal pressure when having a bowel movement, even though i am almost always very regular and hardly push if at all. i also have pain sometimes and occasionally a little bleeding, but i had just assumed this was hemorrhoids and a separate issue from the prolapse (and it's gotten a lot better in the past two months or so).
I hate to say it, but rectal pain and bleeding should probably be investigated by an MD, which applies to Kiddoson too. It's easy to forget, especially when you're also dealing with a pelvic organ issue like prolapse, but not every complaint has to do with reproductive health. Yeah, the bleeding is probably hemorrhoids or an anal fissure, and the pain probably has something to do with the BM pushing against the damaged rectal wall or uterus, but who knows?

Quote:
Originally Posted by threadbey View Post
anyone else out there mostly feeling ok for now, but frequently worried about later in life? i.e. i don't want surgery in 10 years!!! or ever! but i also don't want to have a leaky bladder/bowl in my mid and later life! and i'd like to keep my uterus! and i might want another child! AND i don't like to talk about any of it with anyone, because if they've heard of prolapse they're sure i need surgery and if they haven't they're freaked out.

hrmph.

trying to be zen and calm about it all.
I'm with you 100%, both on the worry and trying to be zen!

At this very moment in time, things are mostly physically okay with me. At least I can totally live with it. But I do worry about future progress of the prolapses, and I've got all the same worries you've got. It's hard not to dwell on it. Luckily the people IRL I've been talking about prolapse with are totally supportive of non-surgical options, and they think my OB was crazy for mentioning hysterectomy as an option to a perfectly healthy 38-year-old.

I'm also trying to get pregnant right now, so it's easy to worry about how uncomfortable a prolapsed uterus is going to feel with a baby growing in it, not to mention how worse it might be afterward!

I'm trying to tell myself that this isn't always a progressive condition -- maybe this is as bad as it will ever get! Plus I'm starting physical therapy in two weeks. And if it does get worse anyway, I'm totally going to look into a pessary. Surgery should be a last-ditch option.
Nicole R.'s Avatar Nicole R. 02:19 AM 12-31-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by xelakann View Post
I see a lot of women here have bladder prolapses... I had a cervix prolapse. Anyone else?
I have a uterine prolapse, which is just another way to think about a cervix prolapse -- since the cervix is the lowest part of the uterus, it's the part that hangs down the furthest. Right now my cervix is a little less than an inch above my vaginal opening, so it's between a grade 1 and 2. (Grade 2 is right at the opening, grade 3 actually sticks out.) I don't know what I was like postpartum, because I wasn't diagnosed until a few weeks ago, over two years postpartum.

I also have a prolapsed bladder (it feels like a bulge in my vaginal wall, but luckily I have no incontinence issues) and a rectal wall which according to my OB is about to give out and give me a rectal prolapse as well.

All three pelvic organs -- it's a prolapse hat trick!

I think it's way too soon for you to worry, and especially to think about surgery. And as many of us have discovered, you probably should stop looking prolapse up online too! But seriously, you just had your baby, so I bet your body will heal a lot all on its own.

My advice: when you go in for your exam, make sure they examine you while you're standing! My prolapses seem to disappear as soon as I lie on my back, so my OB missed them for several years. (Like I said, .)
WendyMomma's Avatar WendyMomma 08:55 AM 12-31-2007
Does anyone have the First Aid for Prolapse DVD that is available at Whole Woman Store? What is it like? Is it helpful?

http://www.wholewomanstore.com/prolapse_p/fafp.htm
wombatclay's Avatar wombatclay 01:00 PM 12-31-2007
I'm with you on the future fear... my mom had a prolapsed uterus for several years (she blamed it on her 10 lbs+ kiddos, thanks mom) and then she fell on a dig and everything sort of "came loose". The dr's did a hysterectomy as part of the repair (she was already menopausal) so she is a big fan of the surgical options. But she also realizes there's a difference between a 30 yr old and a 50 yr old in terms of "best option".

Bleh.

Oh, and I have both a bladder and a uterine prolapse. My cervix is just inside...about half a finger joint...and my bladder is "droopy" to use my OB's very technical term.

A question- How much "better" does a prolapse get? Honestly, what is the best case scenario?
nicoley73's Avatar nicoley73 05:55 PM 12-31-2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by wombatclay View Post
A question- How much "better" does a prolapse get? Honestly, what is the best case scenario?
I think best case scenario is being asymptomatic. As long as you feel okay, it doesn't really matter where your cervix is, ykwim? I'm sure mine is pretty low, but it doesn't bother me (and I refuse to check because I don't want to get depressed if it's low.)
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