Did you hold your boy back from Kindergarten for a year? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 09:34 AM - Thread Starter
 
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What are your thoughts on delaying entry to kindergarten for a summer birthday boy?

My DS was born in early August. His first day of Pre-K was his 4th birthday and though he’s intellectually ready for Pre-K and I think probably Kindergarten next year, my husband is concerned with his level of maturity. DH teaches/taught and has seen a lot of kids and keeps suggesting that our son would do much better if we kept him back for another year of pre-k so that he will be more mature, more readily able to sit, participate, cut on the lines rather than chatting and getting distracted, etc.

I’m starting to get won over to the idea if only so that he doesn’t get labeled as the silly can’t sit still kid just because he’s less mature and somehow establish a pattern. I’d also read in some blog that older parents were saying it made a good difference to have sons going to college at 19 vs 18.

Anyone have a similar dilemma? What did you end up doing and why?
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#2 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 09:58 AM
 
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I'm in the same situation as you, with a four year old son who will turn 5 in early August. At this point, I'm leaning towards letting him go to kindergarten. Even though he is less mature than my daughter at that age, he is actually getting a bit bored with preschool. I spoke with his pediatrician who feels that he is ready, and my son himself really wants to go.

I might not feel the same way if he did not have an older sister who will be in second grade at the same school. I have volunteered at the school a great deal and usually my son accompanies me (when he's not in his 1/2 day preschool.) So, I am very familiar with the kindergarten routine at this school and feel it is geared well towards young children that aren't quite ready to sit still (they move around a lot to different stations, etc.) In addition, ds already knows many of the teachers and the librarian at the school, so he feels very comfortable there. As a matter of fact, the last time I volunteered in the library, ds tried to line up with the kindergarten class and go back to class with them!


Of course, that is MY situation. Everyone is different. My advice to you is that you should visit the school with your son, and maybe even see if you can schedule a day that you and he can observe the class for a period of time. That will really help you decide if you think your son is ready for that environment. Either way, it will help solidify your decision, so that in your own mind you are very comfortable with what you end up doing. Good luck!
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#3 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 11:18 AM
 
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My son turned 5 last August, and he is in the Junior Kindergarten at the school where I teach. That means he'll be in Kindergarten next year. The JK class is all boys who have June, July, August, or September birthdays. I think there's one April birthday in there too. We absolutely love it for our son. He has blossomed with the teacher he has, and I'm so thankful that we'll get an extra year of his childhood. JK and K don't have homework, so his after-school free playtime can continue for another year.

I teach in the middle school, and I've noticed that the "older" boys do better in the transitional years of middle school. The brain development that goes on during the middle school years helps the student go from very concrete thinking to abstract thinking, and it's tough on the 8th grade boy whose brain hasn't made that leap. So the benefits of holding a boy back a year for K may not be seen until the middle school or high school years. And when I projected forward the ages and grades, I was pretty sure we'd be better off with an 18 yo still at home, rather than an 18 yo heading off to college a month after his birthday.

This option was available to me because I teach here (and it's a boys' school, which is why I only am talking about boys), but I'm so glad it worked out this way. Our local public school system does not offer a JK, so that would have put us in a difficult spot. I'm also looking forward to the JK program for my daughter at our sister school, because she has a September birthday. To me the big bonus is extending the childhood at the front.

Leslie, mommy to DS (5) and DD (3)

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#4 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 11:22 AM
 
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I would strongly consider holding him back one year. If my ds had a summer/late birthday I already know I would.

Dd has a July birthday and is young in her class. She's never had any problems - socially nor academically (if that's what you call it in kindergarten, lol!). However, last year, in PK4, 3 of the 4 younger boys parents/teachers held them back to repeat PK4 due to maturity issues. Personally, I can see that ds (25 mos.) develops/matures some skills more slowly than dd ever did and am glad that his birthday falls so that he will be older in his class.
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#5 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 11:55 AM
 
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I'm a big fan of delaying school entry, especially for little boys. I've seen both boys and girls end up hating school because they were just not ready for the expectations.

My husband's brother was young in his class and really hated it in the high school years. He got pushed into some partying and adult priorities he just wasn't ready for by older peers. He held back both of his own children a year, just on principle, and they are doing well.

My dd was born just after the cutoff, so she went to school with her year and was really ready. One of her friends started young and ended up being held back though.

My older ds is home with me this year, though -- he would have been probably the youngest in his class. I am just now feeling that he is beginning to be truly ready. He has some moments of boredom once in a while, but we have also REALLY enjoyed the extra year of early childhood together. I think he will have SO much more confidence next year.

For extra intellectual challenge, we're doing some homeschool curriculum in areas his kindergarten won't cover (like art appreciation) and just reading and talking a lot together. We also have enrolled him in extra sports programs. During his K year and grade 1 year we will probably not do much extracurricular -- the transition to school is enough of a schedule challenge.
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#6 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 12:30 PM
 
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My youngest is only 3 1/2 right now, but I'm already thinking about this. I cannot imagine holding him back, but I'm afraid that so many other people holding their boys back will make things difficult for him. He is big for is age, very articulate, and does quite well socially at age 3. His birthday is before the kindergarten cut-off date (by three days). Why hold him back? The only problem for me is that so many other people are doing it.

My mother watches a boy with an April birthday that was held back. He is in kindergarten now and will be 7 in a couple of months. He is very tall for his age and way taller than the rest of his class (yes, he may have a sports advantage later). His parents held him back because he didn't have the greatest fine motor skills or social skills. My older son is also in kindergarten. he just turned 6 last month. He also did not have the greatest fine motor or social skills, but with a January birthday, of course he went to kindergarten. It is amazing how far he has come so far this school year. He colors very neatly in the lines, as opposed to simply scribbling like he did before school. He is doing great academically and socially. He is a little small for his age and has some kids in his class that are much bigger than him, but it doesn't seem to bother him at all. Sorry to ramble a bit about this. I've been thinking about it a lot lately.

A couple of interesting articles
http://www.slate.com/id/2196423/
http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpag...=&pagewanted=1

Marie-Mom to two boys and a girl.
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#7 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 12:41 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Aubergine68 View Post
I'm a big fan of delaying school entry, especially for little boys. I've seen both boys and girls end up hating school because they were just not ready for the expectations.

My husband's brother was young in his class and really hated it in the high school years. He got pushed into some partying and adult priorities he just wasn't ready for by older peers. He held back both of his own children a year, just on principle, and they are doing well.

My dd was born just after the cutoff, so she went to school with her year and was really ready. One of her friends started young and ended up being held back though.

My older ds is home with me this year, though -- he would have been probably the youngest in his class. I am just now feeling that he is beginning to be truly ready. He has some moments of boredom once in a while, but we have also REALLY enjoyed the extra year of early childhood together. I think he will have SO much more confidence next year.

For extra intellectual challenge, we're doing some homeschool curriculum in areas his kindergarten won't cover (like art appreciation) and just reading and talking a lot together. We also have enrolled him in extra sports programs. During his K year and grade 1 year we will probably not do much extracurricular -- the transition to school is enough of a schedule challenge.

I could have written your post exactly! I kept my Aug. b-day son home for an extra year. It had nothing to do with academics-he falls in the moderately gifted realm-and everything to do with emotional readiness. We loosly follwed an eclectic homeschool curriculum, but primarily did art, music and movement types of classes. Read tons together and visited the library, etc. Had playdates, etc. Right around this time last year (5 1/2) I could sense the shift toward really wanting to go to school. He entered school this year so emotionally ready to be there, enthusiastic, and he mostly loves it. Sitting still and following directions still are not his strong suit, but it's better than it was a year ago, which makes school a more pleasurable experience for him.

As for being academically ready a year earlier--it still didn't sway me to send him at barely 5 y/o. IMO, kindy still is about more than just academics.
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#8 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 12:51 PM
 
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We went through this last year with our son at this time. He's an early August. He had gone to pre-K, and the school basically suggested their young fives program. At first I questioned it. Either he was going to be doing the same thing as preschool or repeating everything again in K a year later. We decided after talking about the program with the actual teacher and a bunch of parents that put their kids in DK (developmental kindergarten) that it just wasn't that way. They do do a lot of what they do in kinder, but at a slower pace focusing on the finer motor skills practice that ends up getting pushed aside more now that they have to learn SO much by the end of the year. They also focus more on social skills and listening skills which my son was doing ok with but there was room for improvement. I think it has taken a lot of the stress out of him trying to catch up with his older class mates. His teacher is also much more patient with him when he gets overwhelmed, because he's in a smaller class environment, and she feels it's her job to help him transition before getting into a bigger setting. She can take in to consideration his younger age when a kinder teacher can not. It is more like what Kindergarten used to be when we were in school. Many parents around here will even place their older kids in there if they can. They say any of there kids that stayed back a year and took this class did better than the ones that didn't.

I would strongly suggest finding a young fives program if you can. For us it has been a very good step.

Mama to Gabe 8-03 and Cyan 5-09
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#9 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 12:52 PM
 
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I will be holding DD back a year. She will turn 5 the September before she is supposed to start Kindergarten. I just think there are so many more positives to holding a child back who is right in this age range.

Blessed with two BEAUTIFUL little girls: Kylie (09/06) and Maggie (4/09) :
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#10 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 01:11 PM
 
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my ds turned 5 in May, and I wish to god now that I had held him back an extra year. He def would have benefited. He is in Grade 1, but does an hour a day in kindergarten.

Mom to Ds1 (8 1/2) Ds2 (6) Dd (2 1/2)!!!!
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#11 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 01:12 PM
 
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If I were doing things over, definitely. Ds has a late August bday, just a few days before the cut off. We tried half day pre-k at age 4 because I was afraid all day kindergarten (our only option) would be too big of a first step. It was a disaster although he was certainly intellectually ready. Now, at age 7 1/2, I'm really seeing that he is beginning to be ready for something like structured schooling (not that we don't plan to continue unschooling). At this point, I honestly think formal schooling should not start before age 8. It would be great if there were unstructured schooling options for kids younger than that.

Mom to unschooling 4everboy since 8/01
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#12 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 01:32 PM
 
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When we lived in Atlanta, there was a strong preference for red-shirting boys. My kids both have middle of winter birthdays, so this is not my issue. But it does make your kid one of the biggest and smartest in their grade and gives them a competitive edge if you are doing sports. It was difficult sometimes to see my kids measured against the red shirt kids.
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#13 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 01:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by philomom View Post
the red shirt kids.

Is this a common term? I'm not sure that I find it particularly helpful to the discussion. I know that for our family giving our son an extra year before entering formal schooling was a thoughtful process that didn't have anything to do with being the biggest or smartest in the class. We spoke with the kindy teacher, psychologist, etc. By and large the advice was to know your child and what would be right for them. Most teachers told us that for younger boys it ultimately worked out better socially and academically in the later years to be older rather than youngest in class. I'm sure lots of people have it work out fine the other way as well-it depends on your child.

I don't know anyone personally who held their kids for sports or to be on the top of their class. For us it was more about not trying to make ourr kid "fit" into a system before he was ready. I guess I don't care to have that labled as being a red shirt kid.
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#14 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 02:03 PM
 
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*Red shirt is a common term.

I'm not in the same situation but I'd definately keep an August boy back if he didn't seem ready with maturity. My son is a May b-day and thank goodness we homeschool, since I'm not sure he would be ready maturity-wise for kindy! Also, it's not even kindy that's the big issue - it's years down the line when the maturity differences really start showing up.

Both of my brothers had problems due to maturity with schooling. My first was one of the oldest in his grades due to an early Jan b-day. (That's when the cut-off was Dec 31). His intellect was years ahead of other kids but he still struggled since he had trouble with maturity. He made it through school on time but it was very difficult. Thank goodness my parents didn't have him skip a grade - which is something the school wanted to do at some point!

My other brother did 9th grade twice, despite passing. He did 9th grade at one school and then transferred into another school and did 9th grade again. That way, he had the extra year without the same stigma of staying behind. It helped him immensly.

Keep in mind that kindy isn't the same as when we were kids either. I know several kindy boys who hate school! I can't imagine 5 year olds hating school based on when I was in school but now I know a slew of them. It's all day long here and that's too long for many kids. There's even homework in kindy now! And with the no child left behind mess, kids are getting more standardized tests as early as first grade. The more testing kids need mean the more teachers have to get done. Art, music, PE, and even recess have been shortened in many elementary schools due to this!
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#15 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 02:16 PM
 
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Yes, "red-shirting" is a common term.
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#16 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 03:29 PM
 
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This has been something I have thought about. My DS is an early August baby. My situation is a little different. He is 3 1/2 and because of a speech delay is in the preschool at the public grade school for free. He has 2 days a week this year, 3 days a week next year at age 4 and then 5 days a week in kindergarten at age 5. I am not sure where we would keep him back. Once they decide he no longer needs therapy then we will have to pay tuition, though allowed to stay in the preschool. By adding a year in there we could very well end up paying not to mention I am not sure they would let him stay in that situation. Also my DS will watch his friends move on without him. Needless to say its a wait and see approach.
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#17 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 04:03 PM
 
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DS isn't even 9 months old yet, but we're already thinking about giving him an extra year at home. I don't think about it as holding a child back, that makes it sound like you're taking something away from them. I think of it more like giving them something... an extra year of childhood, a chance to be more mature among their peers, etc. I'd like DS to be closer to 19 when he goes off to university (or whatever) after high school.

We'll make the final decision when the time gets closer. If the interest in academics is there, but the social and emotional stuff isn't we'll probably do some homeschooling. We won't stop him from learning about the things he's interested in. The decision will be if he's ready to be in a classroom or not, although I worry more about the upper grades than the early ones. My DH's birthday was very close to the cutoff, and MIL has said that while his academics were always great, and while the early years were fine, when he got older it was obvious that he was "young" compared to the other boys.

Our older DD goes to preschool three days a week. The program is out of our community centre, and is totally geared toward school prep. I feel really bad for a lot of the boys in the class. DD comes home constantly talking about how the boys push, the boys won't sit still, the boys don't do their worksheets properly, and so on. It was the same thing when DD took a preschool art class. The girls loved every minute of it, and the boys really had no interest in sitting quietly at tables and working on art projects for an hour.

Julie - Mom to Elizabeth (Libby) age 6, Penelope (Penny) age 5, Elliott age 29 months, and Oscar who is 1 year old!
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#18 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 04:17 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hanbonem View Post
What are your thoughts on delaying entry to kindergarten for a summer birthday boy?

My DS was born in early August. His first day of Pre-K was his 4th birthday and though he’s intellectually ready for Pre-K and I think probably Kindergarten next year, my husband is concerned with his level of maturity. DH teaches/taught and has seen a lot of kids and keeps suggesting that our son would do much better if we kept him back for another year of pre-k so that he will be more mature, more readily able to sit, participate, cut on the lines rather than chatting and getting distracted, etc.

I’m starting to get won over to the idea if only so that he doesn’t get labeled as the silly can’t sit still kid just because he’s less mature and somehow establish a pattern. I’d also read in some blog that older parents were saying it made a good difference to have sons going to college at 19 vs 18.

Anyone have a similar dilemma? What did you end up doing and why?

Following this discussion. My son is an August birthday, and I got lots of questions as to why I didn't start him in 3 y.o preschool this year...!!
... Because he would have been the youngest kid in the class and hadn't finished PL'ing, etc. He will likely start kindergarten a year "later", too.

I've heard the term "red shirting" before, and it frustrates me. I choose to hold my son "back" and not to send him with the other 3 y/o kids (and subsequently, the other 4 and 5 and 6 year olds) *because he is not ready* for things that kids who have had 11 more months to mature are fairly competent with. I don't think it is fair to him to expect him to be able to do the things as a "young 3" that the "old 3" kids are doing. He is still learning to 'use his words', to take himself to the bathroom independently, and to interact with other kids his age in an appropriate manner (i.e., not bursting into tears when someone takes a toy from him).

I am for sure not doing this because I want to give him a competitive edge in sports, for pete's sake. I am making what I think is a thoughtful decision in order to give my child a fighting chance and hopefully help him not to despise school because he was asked to do things at an earlier age than he was developmentally prepared for.



*I just deleted several paragraphs of a rant about our educational system and its faults -- I'll spare you all that. I am a little offended by the thought that I am 'holding my child back' to increase his sports competitiveness or to make him "smartest in his class" later on. It's more like trying not to completely destroy his young years by forcing him to do things he's not developmentally capable of at three and four and five....

Mama to A 8/05 and S 11/06
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#19 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 04:18 PM
 
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I cross-posted with you, ChetMC. I think you put it very well.

Mama to A 8/05 and S 11/06
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#20 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 05:12 PM
 
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We sort of had this decision made for us. DS has an early Sept. birthday. Had we done public school, they would have taken him for K at almost-5 and he probably would have been OK. However, the private school we sent him to generally requires age 5 by about June, especially for boys. With a February birthday, DD is one of the youngest in this year's K class. For us its not such a big issue since all of the kids are "older" than most public schools.

However, my one regret about this is that I felt the year he turned 5 and was still in preschool for another year was a waste of time. He had already mastered preschool material, but they couldn't really do too much more for him. I WOHM, so he had to be somewhere. So consider what the alternative plan for the year is in making the decision, as well as how that will stack things up for the future for him.
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#21 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 05:14 PM
 
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Well, I didn't mean to start a fire. I was basing my statements on 10 years collective experience with my kids in a fabulous public school. When my kids started school, I had not even known of this phenomena which was so prevalent in that particular wealthy public school district.

However, it is easy to pick out the red shirt boys in kindy or first grade. They are smarter, louder, better coordinated and often the class leaders or class bullies. On the soccer teams, they are miles ahead with making goals and running, kicking and such. I have heard the dads boasting about "that extra year boost" their boys have.

I'd strongly suggest you have a talk with your school's principal and see if red-shirting is a strong component of your community. Truly, I wish I had known. My kids really struggled with their peers being so "big". Thank goodness they both shine at some things, so we muddled through.

Lastly, just from a sociological point of view.... this creates sort of a two tiered classroom setting. Kids from poor homes, single parents or others who cannot afford another year of stay at home or half day preschool will send their kids to school "on time";thus creating a situation where these "on -time" kids may not preform as well as the red shirts kids. Lower self-esteem, lower tests scores and feeling bad about being little or slower than the others may be part of what these kids will face every day.
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#22 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 05:59 PM
 
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We sent our young DS to KG last fall. Our cut off is Dec 31 and he only turned 5 in Dec. The jury is still out in terms of how this will go. I was the most reluctant to send him of the voices in the discussion and I continue to have the most hesitation about the decision. For us, we consider stuff about our kid:

-very big and physically coordinated for his age
-bright and ready academically
-two best friends also going to KG and going to same school

Things about the school
-not super competitive academically, a more old-fashioned KG experience
-red-shirting not common here

Things about the rest of the environment
-continuing at his old PS not a good option for many reasons
-other options unclear, though we could have found something

Mostly things are going ok. He's a bit grumpy about school these days, but it's mid-winter and everyone is a bit grumpy about it, including his older friends. He's had some tussles with a girl in his class but he seems to be managing them more or less. One of his friends has one of the 'red shirt' kids in her class and the kid is a real bully. That doesn't necessarily happen but in our environment with our kid, it could happen.

Like I said, I'm still the least convinced that sending him was a good idea though our alternatives also weren't great. We both work outside the home.

One thing that helped me was a long talk with a friend with an older boy. She had many stories of KG success and lack of success among her friends. I concluded two things from these stories - First, there wasn't a clear correlation between being young and having trouble. There was plenty of trouble in KG but often there were signs that there would be trouble and the signs were not always about age. Second, even 'disasters' at the KG level are not that hard to recover from. Some kids muddled on, some did a year of home schooling, some changed schools, some repeated KG. Sure, none of this was fun, but none of it was tragic either.
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#23 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 06:51 PM
 
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Does your son go to preschool anywhere? Have you asked his teacher what she thinks?

Also, some school districts will do "kindergarten readiness" screens for children with July/Aug birthdays. if you're planning on sending him to public school, you might call and see if they do that. You could have him screened and even if they recommend that he goes, you can still decide to hold him back a year.

There was a big article on delaying kindergarten entry or not in the New York Times maybe 2 years ago? Here, I found a link for it: When Should a Kid Start Kindergarten?
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#24 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 06:58 PM
 
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Boys Adrift: The Five Factors Driving the Growing Epidemic of Unmotivated Boys and Underachieving Young Men
by Leonard Sax

Among other things Sax advocates that boys start school later than age five. I've heard him interviewed and he begs parents of five year old boys to keep them home an extra year. The book is a really interesting read.

Julie - Mom to Elizabeth (Libby) age 6, Penelope (Penny) age 5, Elliott age 29 months, and Oscar who is 1 year old!
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#25 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 07:03 PM
 
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Originally Posted by philomom View Post
Well, I didn't mean to start a fire.


I got off the computer earlier and now I am sort of sheepish. I didn't mean to get defensive in my previous post.



I'm thinking about both sides, now, and that is an interesting point about a "two tiered classroom". I had honestly never thought about parents sending their kids to school a year "early" because they couldn't afford anothe year at home, etc., and having discrepancies later on. I think it would only add to the divide between SES groups - now that I am seeing that perhaps keeping kids at home a little longer is a financial privilege of sorts?

Mama to A 8/05 and S 11/06
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#26 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 07:20 PM
 
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I agree that it's an interesting perspective re: a two-tiered system. Many of the private schools around here have later starting dates for kindy cut-off than public. That's an interesting economic angle.

However, could we please refrain from calling children "red shirt boys"? I am not sure that labels like this are helpful and I certainly don't think it's respectful to the process some parents may go through, or to the children themselves.
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#27 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 07:22 PM
 
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I had honestly never thought about parents sending their kids to school a year "early" because they couldn't afford anothe year at home, etc., and having discrepancies later on. I think it would only add to the divide between SES groups - now that I am seeing that perhaps keeping kids at home a little longer is a financial privilege of sorts?
From what I've read on the topic, it's a huge aspect of this issue. The SES of a neighbourhood is a big indicator with regard to how much red shirting goes on, at least in the US. I don't think that red shirting is particularly popular in Canada.

The stay at home moms I know, for the most part, are highly educated. They're married to a DH who has an income that can support a family (provided they make reasonable choices with regard to spending). There's no financial pressure to get kids into school to stop paying for daycare, or so mom can go back to work. These families can much more easily choose to keep a child home for an extra year, or even to home school if that's what suits the child and the family best.

Julie - Mom to Elizabeth (Libby) age 6, Penelope (Penny) age 5, Elliott age 29 months, and Oscar who is 1 year old!
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#28 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 07:29 PM
 
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I'm a little sad that this is considered a gender issue. I realize that girls and boys often develop differently, but ALL children develop differently. Isn't that why we guide our children as individuals?
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#29 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 07:36 PM
 
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I think it's pretty common around here for boys and girls. I have a pretty good friend who "red shirted" (not for a sports advantage, just a common term for starting a kid late) her dd with an August b-day. She has excelled and I imagine she would have done well had she gone on time, too. I also have friends who started their petite son with a May b-day late. He's in private school, too. My dd's don't have b-days that are in question. I think my dd2 (5 last Nov) would probably do fine academically in K right now, but she has some separation anxiety issues that we're working out in Pre-K. How do you think your DS compares maturity wise to his Pre-K peers? I think it all just depends on the individual kids in question. I think generally kids are better with their peers in school (maturity- and academics- wise in the best of worlds) unless you have the benefit of a mixed age classroom (which we LOVE for dd1). It can be hard for a kid who is bigger than everyone else and more mature than everyone else to be in a "little kids" classroom, too.

hth

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#30 of 124 Old 02-02-2009, 07:49 PM
 
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I am responding in this thread even though it is my daughter who may not be ready for kindergarten. I have b/g twins born late June with an August 1st cutoff. I have been struggling with this decision. I was the youngest in my class but never had a problem – back then the cutoff was Dec 31st. Now it does seem to be common in our area to hold back boys born near the cutoff - I've been told it is due to emotional immaturity although I know of some parents who feel there is an added benefit for athletics.

I don’t want to hold back my son because he seems so ready but I don’t want the two of them in separate grades. The point pp's made about a child being ready now but the age difference becoming an issue in future years is a good point.
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