Hurray! Third grade DS is going to 4th grade math class! - Mothering Forums

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Old 08-20-2009, 10:01 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My middle DS loves math and is quite skilled in the subject. Last year in 2nd grade he learned nothing new in math during school, so I was determined to be the squeaky wheel this year and make sure he wasn't bored in math. After writing to and meeting with the principal this summer, they have arranged for him to leave his 3rd grade classroom each day and go to a 4th grade class for his math lesson. The two teachers are making sure the times mesh so he can do this. Hurray! Hurray! He is a young 3rd grader and more on a 3rd grade level in reading and writing so a whole grade skip would not have been appropriate.

So far his older brother doesn't seem bothered that his younger brother is attending a class in the same grade (different classroom though). I am hoping this will not change as they tend to be very competitive.

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Old 08-20-2009, 10:30 PM
 
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How fabulous that the school is working with you to provide an appropriate learning environment for your DS!

My older DD has done the same thing- she's been moved up a grade level for both math and reading. She was SO much happier at school after being moved up a level; she's no longer completely bored and she doesn't act out anymore. Similar to you, I now have two children who are in the same math & reading classes. For the most part, there isn't much competition between the two and they get along well in class.

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Old 08-22-2009, 03:49 AM
 
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That is a step better then what they did for my 5th grader, which was to just issue him a 6th grade math boook. He was very good at just working his way throught it. If he had a problem, he would ask his teacher and she would help him. Other then that, he was on his own (6th grade is at the middle school).

The silly thing is, he had to take all the same tests his classmates were taking because of the standards rules at our school. It was nice when he move to the middle school, he was put in the 6th grade honors math.

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Old 08-22-2009, 12:03 PM
 
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That's terrific. My ds had a subject acceleration too when he was in primary school, but for language arts. I think it's a great solution for some advanced learners. I wish it was offered more often.
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Old 08-22-2009, 06:50 PM
 
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Thats great that the school was willing to do that. To me, it seems like such a simple, obvious fix but DS' school certainly didn't see it that way.

 

 

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Old 08-23-2009, 12:42 AM
 
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Thats great that the school was willing to do that. To me, it seems like such a simple, obvious fix but DS' school certainly didn't see it that way.
That's too bad. Unfortunately, it's a fix that requires multiple people to get on board and a little co-ordination, both operational and administrative. The assigned classroom teacher, the higher grade teacher, and the principal all have to agree to the plan. They have to work out communication between the teachers and home will happen, how reporting and grading gets done, who is responsible for report cards - if just one person decides they don't want to participate, it won't happen.

Did the school offer any other accommodations or modifications?
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Old 08-23-2009, 02:27 PM
 
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Did the school offer any other accommodations or modifications?
No. With four 1st grades and 4 2nd grades, I would have really thought they could work something out, but We ended up just putting him in the full time gifted program, but I really like our home school. It sounds like you guys have the perfect solution!

 

 

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Old 08-23-2009, 02:33 PM
 
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No. With four 1st grades and 4 2nd grades, I would have really thought they could work something out, but We ended up just putting him in the full time gifted program, but I really like our home school. It sounds like you guys have the perfect solution!
Actually, it was a short-term solution, but it worked well for a while. We eventually moved to a full-time gifted program too. For us, the full-time, self-contained class was the optimum solution.

I think subject acceleration should be more popular - it has a lot of advantages over grade acceleration. It's just more work on the part of the school, so it's unlikely to become widespread.
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Old 08-23-2009, 08:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
That's too bad. Unfortunately, it's a fix that requires multiple people to get on board and a little co-ordination, both operational and administrative. The assigned classroom teacher, the higher grade teacher, and the principal all have to agree to the plan. They have to work out communication between the teachers and home will happen, how reporting and grading gets done, who is responsible for report cards - if just one person decides they don't want to participate, it won't happen.

Did the school offer any other accommodations or modifications?
Thats crazy! When my dd was racing though the 2nd grade math the teacher tested her and moved her up to 3rd grade math and now thats she's going into 3rd grade she's moving into 4th grade math. There was never any fuss or anything.

Seriously?
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Old 08-23-2009, 08:29 PM
 
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Thats crazy! When my dd was racing though the 2nd grade math the teacher tested her and moved her up to 3rd grade math and now thats she's going into 3rd grade she's moving into 4th grade math. There was never any fuss or anything.
Are we talking about the same thing? In our case, it wasn't just the same teacher giving work from a higher grade. He actually left his Grade 1 classroom each day and went into a Grade 3 class for some subjects.

I appreciated the fact that the teachers wanted to make sure lines of communication and grading/reporting responsibilities were clear. It didn't seem crazy to me at all. It seemed like they cared, and wanted to make sure that there was a good system in place for a fairly unusual situation.
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Old 08-23-2009, 09:22 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ollyoxenfree View Post
Are we talking about the same thing? In our case, it wasn't just the same teacher giving work from a higher grade. He actually left his Grade 1 classroom each day and went into a Grade 3 class for some subjects.

I appreciated the fact that the teachers wanted to make sure lines of communication and grading/reporting responsibilities were clear. It didn't seem crazy to me at all. It seemed like they cared, and wanted to make sure that there was a good system in place for a fairly unusual situation.
There was no need to leave the class in our case. In 1st she was in a split 1/2 class so she just did some work with the 2nd graders then when we switched to a virtual public school there was no classroom to worry about and we can move her though the materials as needed. Its worked well for us but virtual schooling is not for everyone I know

Seriously?
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Old 08-24-2009, 12:54 PM
 
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There was no need to leave the class in our case.
Ahhh - that explains it. I know that it's fairly common for a teacher simply to give an advanced learner lessons and from an upper grade textbook. That's one accommodation that often works well.

What I like about subject acceleration into a different, upper grade classroom is that the advanced learner gets to work with some peers - there is an exchange of ideas and some mutual motivation. They can share thoughts and work on projects together. But I know some students prefer to work alone and don't mind doing their own thing while the rest of the class works together .
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