Sport team support at school - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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Old 01-21-2010, 04:09 PM
 
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Originally Posted by velochic View Post
I never "bragged" that I keep her sheltered. I said we are not interested in spectator sports and we don't watch or participate in the "rah-rah" stuff. How does that make it "sheltering". She's certainly getting enough exposure (to the point of exclusion) at school. She still doesn't want to watch football. Should I force her to, so she can "fit in"?
I'd never suggest forcing someone to watch something (and it wouldn't be really useful anyway if you and your husband don't understand the sport to offer explanations). I just think that it's important to be aware of what's going on in your city. Though you don't care about football, it does bring in significant amounts of money in the cities that maximize their exposure (and that's pretty universally true for the teams in this year's playoffs). Knowing that it exists is part of being a member of your community.

We live in Kentucky. I couldn't care less about the Kentucky Derby. I've never watched it and have no intention to. In fact, I have numerous ethical problems with horse racing. Still I know the Derby exists and when it is. I'm aware of the major events surrounding it. (How could I not be? They're advertised everywhere, covered in the local papers, etc.)

In that sense, I don't think knowing that your city has a team in the playoffs is a bad thing. Nor does it mean that you need to watch football. It just means you're aware of what's happening in your community.

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Old 01-21-2010, 04:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by EFmom View Post
I don't exactly view professional sports in the same category as pornography, but almost. I think they are pointless and a huge waste of time and money. I think they have a largely negative societal impact. Pornography at least has a point.
That's full of huge misconceptions that come from someone who doesn't understand sports culture. You can't claim ignorance on the one hand and negativity on the other. If you don't care for sports, then how do you know that it's negative? Sports has in many ways served as a positive cultural force (see academic research on integration in Southern schools, for instance). Not to like it is fine, but blaming it for a host of social ills isn't.

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Old 01-21-2010, 04:37 PM
 
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That's full of huge misconceptions that come from someone who doesn't understand sports culture. You can't claim ignorance on the one hand and negativity on the other. If you don't care for sports, then how do you know that it's negative? Sports has in many ways served as a positive cultural force (see academic research on integration in Southern schools, for instance). Not to like it is fine, but blaming it for a host of social ills isn't.
I don't care for methamphetamine, but I know it's negative.

There are certainly some positive things that can be attributed to professional sports, but a host of negatives as well. On the balance, I see the negatives far outweighing the positives. I'm an academic. I see the negatives that our university's teams bring to campus on a daily basis, and don't need to attend a single football game to do so.

But the point here isn't whether or not sports have redeeming social impact. It's whether or not one has an obligation to immerse one's family in something one doesn't find in the least bit edifying. I'm not seeing it.

My kids have to listen to endless idiotic bantering about professional sports from the teachers and administrators at her school. They even make announcements about which team has won the game in morning. Then they complain about not having enough instructional time, but I digress.

One of my kids wanted to engage me in a discussion about whether or not I liked the Yankees or the Red Socks as a result of all the blithering at school. If both teams fell off the face of the earth, that would be fine with me. Knowing she doesn't know the first thing about baseball, I told her she could watch a game with me. It took her about ten minutes for her to realize that was ten minutes of her life she'd never get back. "Mom, how do people watch this stuff?" Beats me, but at least I hadn't wasted money on a jersey.
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Old 01-21-2010, 09:53 PM
 
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It's whether or not one has an obligation to immerse one's family in something one doesn't find in the least bit edifying. I'm not seeing it.
I'm repeating myself but...

it's not about whether or not the parent is "immersing" the child, it's about whether or not the parent is leaving space for their child to form their own opinions on the world.

I feel that I have an obligation to leave that space for my kids. Some parents are just the opposite. They feel that their children are best off with no space to form their own opinions. I'm surprised that pro sports is an issue that parents would feel this way about, but whatever.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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Old 01-22-2010, 03:13 AM
 
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I'm repeating myself but...

it's not about whether or not the parent is "immersing" the child, it's about whether or not the parent is leaving space for their child to form their own opinions on the world.

I feel that I have an obligation to leave that space for my kids. Some parents are just the opposite. They feel that their children are best off with no space to form their own opinions.
Linda, I hear your point, but I don't think the pps on this thread who aren't into sport are doing that. For example, velo's DD didn't want to participate but felt like she had to in order to fit in with the school, & EFmom actually sat down to watch a sport with her child.

I'm aware that there are plenty of parents out there who give their kids no opportunity to form an opinion that doesn't fit with the family mold (certain religious beliefs spring immediately to mind, for example), but i'm just not seeing that from the pps. :

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Old 01-24-2010, 01:15 AM
 
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Returned. Please post respectfully and abide by the User Agreement even if you don't agree with one another! Thanks

 
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Old 01-25-2010, 12:33 PM
 
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I think the issue is that school-driven events like spirit days must be structured so that non-participating children - for whatever reason, whether lack of interest, religious reasons, finances, anything - are not made to feel excluded or in the wrong.

It's important to the well-being of schools and the children in them that the adults running them not inadvertently create innies and outies, or suggest that 'belonging' or 'not standing out' are the most important values to be had.
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Old 01-25-2010, 04:29 PM
 
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velochic---I had a hard enough time finding clothes that fit the color days. I actually can't stand that so many schools in the region, ours included, devote school time to pep rallies and encourage wearing sports team apparel during playoffs. Nor do I think it's the best use of instructional time to teach the Eagles' fight song in music class. I think it puts pressure on kids and families to purchase gear when otherwise they wouldn't. Many kids have official jerseys and others may only be able to afford the cheap walmart tee, yk?

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Old 01-25-2010, 04:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mammastar2 View Post
I think the issue is that school-driven events like spirit days must be structured so that non-participating children - for whatever reason, whether lack of interest, religious reasons, finances, anything - are not made to feel excluded or in the wrong.

It's important to the well-being of schools and the children in them that the adults running them not inadvertently create innies and outies, or suggest that 'belonging' or 'not standing out' are the most important values to be had.

Agreed. Our elem. school has monthly spirit days where wearing of school gear is encouraged BUT each child was given a free school shirt at the beginning of the year, so no pressure on the family to buy anything. Even just wearing the school color is encouraged.

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Old 01-27-2010, 10:46 PM
 
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I wanted to chime in that when we have a 'jersey day' at school, my daughter wears her ballet company t-shirt. I tell her "your sport is ballet, so you get to support your ballet team on jersey day". She seems to get lots of positive feedback, since it is an athletic activity she actually does, rather than 'just' being a team fan.

(btw I think it's asinine to ask girls to wear a jersey for a sport only the big boys get to play professionally ... but that's another thread, and I don't include that editorial when dd is getting dressed on jersey day!)

Anyway, I don't think there is anything wrong with making 'jersey day' or any other school theme day fit in more with your own family ... rather than making your family fit in to it.

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