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#61 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 05:18 AM
 
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She marches to a different beat and I worry that she might be drawn into conforming to the group at the expense of who she is.
the thing is YOU cant make this decision. it has to be your dd's and you'd be surprised that even at 5 they can make that decision for you.

however as others pointed out, it so depends on the child's personality, what the school has to offer, funding, diversity present, area, etc.

my dd goes to a public school. and honestly we do that not because we had a choice. my dd is in second grade and has never liked school since her 3rd day in K.

she too beats to a different tune and learns much differently. she has more the personality for a sudbury kind of school. so is she getting much out of the school? not really. she loves skipping as often as she can.

on the other hand her good friend really loves it and gets a lot out of school.

i thought being the ultra social child my dd would love school. but because her learning style is so different (she is the kind who likes spending hours on one thing instead of jumping around a lot) and even what she wants to play so different - that she hasnt really fit into school. she is the kind who would play for 6 months and then learn all teh stuff in 6 months.

so for my family, school is teaching and babysitting because mommy has to 'work'. of course there is a lot dd is getting out of the experience which i think in a sad way IS building her character.

things like understanding that sometimes you just have to deal with the hand life deals you. she likes directing her own learning rather than being told what to learn. left to her own devices she probably wouldnt learn how to read till she was 9 or 10 which would have been fine with me. she would probably do a lot of projects. however me as her only teacher would not work at all.

instead coop hsing is her perfect schooling - though we would lack diversity - which however we have a lot of in our social life.

however i do completely agree with you that schools are meant to feed 'factories'. looking at the curriculum i find v. little is encouraged to make good citizens. it amazes me that reading adn writing is stressed on so much in k instead of developmental stuff like how to get along.

if hsing works for your family - i cant imagine a better education for your child than hsing and internship (i forget the word i want to use here).

the only way you will truly know what school means to you is to put dd in school and see how she does.

i do a lot of afterschool stuff with dd - sometimes academic, sometimes not.

i guess what school means to dd was summed up by her statement to her teacher in k 'i come to school to party and go home to learn.' she hasnt changed that attitude two years later.

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#62 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 11:17 AM
 
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So far, one of my biggest reasons for homeschooling dd5, at least for this year, is to keep her quirkiness and uniqueness intact. To ballet class this week she wore a bright green headband, a HUGE purple flower and a pink bow right on top of her head. She marches to a different beat and I worry that she might be drawn into conforming to the group at the expense of who she is.
I can appreciate and understand your concern. My dd is the same way and always has been. She is 7-years-old now and is in 1st grade at a private school. She wears a uniform every, single day to school and then comes home and puts on her polka dot tights with a striped dress of different colors and some crazy headband with a huge flower on it, etc. She even finds ways to "jazz" up her school uniform with shoes that have glitter on them, bright headbands, etc. She is a 7-year-old girl who loves make-believe, art, fairies, animals, etc. Many of the girls her age are into Hannah Montanta, High School musical, etc. and my dd has ZERO interest in that. Yet, she maintains good friendships with these girls, is well-liked at school and really, truly loves school.

My point is that school is not going to necessarily rob your kid of who she is. If you feel as though homeschooling is right for your family, then that's what you should do. I just wouldn't be so quick to assume that school will change her or shape her into someone other than herself. Some of that quirkiness might be lost a bit with age regardless of how she is schooled.

Good luck with your decision.
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#63 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 11:41 AM
 
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So far, one of my biggest reasons for homeschooling dd5, at least for this year, is to keep her quirkiness and uniqueness intact. To ballet class this week she wore a bright green headband, a HUGE purple flower and a pink bow right on top of her head. She marches to a different beat and I worry that she might be drawn into conforming to the group at the expense of who she is.
My dd went off to her public school today wearing a short-sleeved indie-screen printed green t-shirt over a long-sleeved purple shirt, and red buffalo plaid pants, and boots in a different red plaid. My ds wore a pair of skinny jeans with patches, a bunch of different shirts layered, including a Kurt Cobain-style plaid buttoned shirt and a black band t-shirt (maybe Ozzie Osbourne?) and a black leather jacket with artwork done by him and his friends (mostly band logos, an anarchy symbol or 2 etc.). It is absolutely possible to maintain your individuality and even celebrate it in school. Their peers and many of their teachers appreciate their style. In fact, they get more attitude about it from people who really shouldn't care at all - shopkeepers, people on the street etc. - in those "real life" places. At school, their desire to express themselves differently - in dress and in their beliefs - is protected and respected.

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however i do completely agree with you that schools are meant to feed 'factories'. looking at the curriculum i find v. little is encouraged to make good citizens. it amazes me that reading adn writing is stressed on so much in k instead of developmental stuff like how to get along.

if hsing works for your family - i cant imagine a better education for your child than hsing and internship (i forget the word i want to use here).
I find a lot of the "good citizenship" development doesn't happen within a set curriculum, although dd's school does have a "good citizen" program, where they highlight a different character trait every month (this month it's respect, last month it was helping others). The program is integrated across all subjects and teachers, and they have a monthly assembly to recognize the students who exemplify that month's character trait.

It's also developed in activities like Reading Buddies, where the older students work with younger children; or group project work and Science Fair teams etc., where students work together; in extra-curriculars like drama and orchestra and team sports; and in activities like raising money for a well in a developing country, visiting seniors' centres, park clean-up, clothing drives for the poor etc. Just because it isn't the government mandated curriculum, doesn't mean the schools aren't working on these areas of development too.

Homeschooling is a terrific option, and for many it's the best educational option for their families. School can provide a great learning community too. It's good to see parents carefully consider all their options.
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#64 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 11:46 AM
 
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I just wouldn't be so quick to assume that school will change her or shape her into someone other than herself. Some of that quirkiness might be lost a bit with age regardless of how she is schooled.
.


My dd (9 next week) prides herself in being different and unique. Still, she is well liked by her schoolmates and has many friends (each unique! although some are more concerned with fitting in than others--but a lot of that is personality, I think). Dd is very into jewelry and magic, and wears a lot of attention grabbing bracelets and necklaces to school (sometimes 20+ bracelets). It isn't a trend in her class; she's the only one with bracelets half way up her arm. Even her teachers ask "What is with all the bracelets?" lol, but she likes to be an individual

And, yes, some does change with age, regardless of schooling. Are you in a homeschool group? Look around at the older kids, and you'll likely find they are following the same basic trends (as a group) as the schooled kids.
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#65 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 02:14 PM
 
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So far, one of my biggest reasons for homeschooling dd5, at least for this year, is to keep her quirkiness and uniqueness intact. To ballet class this week she wore a bright green headband, a HUGE purple flower and a pink bow right on top of her head. She marches to a different beat and I worry that she might be drawn into conforming to the group at the expense of who she is.
This is something I have/was concerned about as well. I have a pretty quirky kid too, and so far we have been able to find environments where he was nourished, accepted and fit right in. I will say, though, that it is hard to find those places and I am fortunate to live in an area with a lot of different public and private school options.
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#66 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 03:44 PM
 
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however i do completely agree with you that schools are meant to feed 'factories'. looking at the curriculum i find v. little is encouraged to make good citizens.
not my kids' school.

not at all.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#67 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 04:27 PM
 
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however i do completely agree with you that schools are meant to feed 'factories'. looking at the curriculum i find v. little is encouraged to make good citizens.
I think the "feeding of factories" concept was the original intent (during the industrial revolution). I believe the thinking evolved a bit with Eisenhower and the whole cold war era, and I believe he even gave a speech about education being important so that we could properly defend ourselves from the U.S.S.R. (we need more scientists to design better weapons!).

Regarding schools making good citizens out of kids: personally I think that the learning of civics (outside of textbook instruction of law, people and events) begins at home. I think that parents are responsible for making good citizens, not schools. I say this because I think "good citizenship" is a very broad term and applies to many facets of practical daily life, not just book knowledge. Not that some schools don't do a good job at it, but the parents should guide the development of the child, and the school should provide access to additional knowledge to aid in that development.

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For example I don't want them to learn about the rights and responsibilities and privileges of living in this wonderful country(Canada) in a grade 10 civics class, I want it to be something they live and understand. So last weekend we went to the Rally against Parliamentary proroguation, a national protest against the government and my kids and I talked about how as citizens are responsible in this country to not only appreciate but to participate and to be grateful for the right to do so.
Again, I think that this type of learning and participation should occur with the parent, whether in school or homeschooled. School, for us, provides access to a wide range of knowledge (a very important thing to us); we, as DD's parent's, will try to provide her with the guidance and instruction into adult personhood. School is just one aspect of her growth and development. An educational choice should enhance the child, not make the child.

"Lawyers, I suppose, were children once." Charles Lamb.
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#68 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 05:11 PM
 
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not my kids' school.

not at all.
Not here either..in fact higher education is the goal in almost every school I've attended or sent a child. It's about career guidance and discovering talents. We're in a big manufacturing area and still I don't see it..we have huge arts programs etc. and a lot of academic schools geared towards those on the University tract.

Of course this is an odd area what with the famous theatre stuff mixed with folks who live here year round and are mostly factory employed.
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#69 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 07:47 PM
 
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I think that school serves to prepare kids for college. Many homeschooling families do wish for their children to attend college, which usually requires some regular class study, even if some independent study is available.

As an adult, I know a couple of homeschooled individuals who are trying to complete college degrees and can't seem to figure out how to work the system enough to complete the requirements. I know that this is not the case for the majority of homeschooled students who go on to college....but I'm just saying, going to school gives kids practice at handling a typical class situation.
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#70 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 07:56 PM
 
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I would say the sense of community and connectedness is a huge plus for us with our school. It's a neighborhood school, and it's very meaningful for dd to go to school with the kids from the families around her. She loves running into kids from class at the library or the grocery store, going one street over for a playdate, and feeling like a part of a specific community. We also like that it helps us to know our adult neighbors, and that we can swap care at pick-up with parents near by. The school also seeks to involve others in the community, and for example I've got to know and be a lot more comfortable with a local shelter because of their involvement at the school.

I also like the 'one-stop' shopping for activities and enrichment that some have mentioned. It's not like this at every school, and we briefly tried another school that was more meat-and-potatoes (i.e. classroom, workbook-based), although it had good points too. But dd loves the lunchtime and after-school activities, the different sports she gets to try, the art projects, music class, field trips, and so on. Obviously we do things as a family too, but this is convenient and well done.

Many people have mentioned diversity as a plus, and it certainly is in our case. We are in an urban area, and her school has kids from houses much bigger and fancier than ours, and kids who live in very small apartments and have a lot less than her. She has friends from all different kinds of ethnic backgrounds, and all different kinds of family arrangements, and the school is extremely welcoming and respectful of all children.

My daughter's 'quirk' factor has been preserved quite happily, and she's thrilled to be known and valued by kids and teachers for her unique fashion sense!

We tried homeschooling for a while, but living in a large urban area without having family roots there was quite isolating as I find people tend to stick with their own usual crowds, and it was always hard chasing people down to do activities together. Part of the problem was also that dh was the stay at home parent, and it was very isolating for him among the sea of mommies - I think he and I ended up feeling a bit forlorn and defective, and also worried about dd only being presented with one model for how families should look. The diversity of experience and family forms available to her with public school suits us much better for now.
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#71 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 08:11 PM - Thread Starter
 
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School is just one aspect of her growth and development. An educational choice should enhance the child, not make the child.
This is an excellent point. This is exactly why I started off with the thought of homeschooling, because I feel my own school experience detractedfrom who I was, instead of enhancing who I was. I hope that by homeschooling I can allow my dtr to blossom into more of who she is, instead of having the rules, expectations of the system and other kids change who she is. Obviously, from this thread, it seems very possible to have a positive, enhancing experience with school and it has given me something to think about for the future.
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#72 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 08:34 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Not here either..in fact higher education is the goal in almost every school I've attended or sent a child. It's about career guidance and discovering talents. We're in a big manufacturing area and still I don't see it..we have huge arts programs etc. and a lot of academic schools geared towards those on the University tract.

Of course this is an odd area what with the famous theatre stuff mixed with folks who live here year round and are mostly factory employed.
I didn't think meemee meant literally feeding factories. What I thought she meant, could be wrong, is that schools sometimes act as the factory, churning out kids who have mostly been educated in a similar way and who therefore may think and act in similar ways to their peers. This is a generalization but part of my concern with schooling my kids in the future.
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#73 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 08:47 PM
 
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I'm really surprised that no one has mentioned that it provides (not always but ideally) a safe, nurturing educational environment for kids while their parents are at work.
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#74 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 09:23 PM
 
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I didn't think meemee meant literally feeding factories. What I thought she meant, could be wrong, is that schools sometimes act as the factory, churning out kids who have mostly been educated in a similar way and who therefore may think and act in similar ways to their peers. This is a generalization but part of my concern with schooling my kids in the future.
Perhaps she did mean that..but I've had discussions with people who say the purpose of schools is to create drone-like people who will make good "workers" factory or otherwise. Non thinker, just doer type people. I've heard that said before.

That's why I went in that direction.
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#75 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 09:31 PM
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I'm really surprised that no one has mentioned that it provides (not always but ideally) a safe, nurturing educational environment for kids while their parents are at work.
I think meemee spoke to the free childcare aspect, and I did as well. I remember talking about this in my graduate school ed classes, too... this is a really essential service for a lot of people.

This article is about the rise of all-day schooling in Germany (where apparently school has traditionally ended at lunch time) in order to provide child care for working moms. I thought it was interesting...

 
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#76 of 107 Old 01-28-2010, 09:37 PM
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Perhaps she did mean that..but I've had discussions with people who say the purpose of schools is to create drone-like people who will make good "workers" factory or otherwise. Non thinker, just doer type people. I've heard that said before.
This was one of the original goals of compulsory education in the U.S. (I don't know about Canada). That was a hundred years ago, though... a lot more people worked in factories, and there were a lot more immigrants... schools were intended to create a more uniformly educated population familiar with the hegemonic cultural ideals of that time period. Three of my four grandparents were children of immigrants or immigrated themselves as very young children, and they all learned English at school.

That was a long time ago, though... schools have changed, and the world has changed.

 
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#77 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 01:32 AM
 
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Speaking only of elementary schools in my area (and yes, my kids have been there although they are HSed at the moment)

I do not think their goal is to produce factory workers, but I do think compliance is expected and valued in the school...mostly in the name of classroom management. Compliance does produce good "workers". It does not necessarily produce good leaders, out of the box thinkers, etc.

Likewise, I do think our schools try to produce good citizens - but it is in a limited way. There is a reading buddies program, older kids are bus helpers, etc. They do some fundraising but it is often for the good of the school - not the community as a whole. They talk a lot about compassion, caring, personal responsibility, etc.

Where they fall down is in producing citizens who are critical thinkers and question what is going on. They have a lot of curriculum to cover with a range of abilities and do not have time to go deeper into issues. Compliance is key. They do believe in compassion, caring, etc...but sometimes their own bureaucracy gets in the way.
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#78 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 02:24 AM
 
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I do not think their goal is to produce factory workers, but I do think compliance is expected and valued in the school...mostly in the name of classroom management. Compliance does produce good "workers". It does not necessarily produce good leaders, out of the box thinkers, etc.
Well, of course compliance is valued in school! I expected compliance when I taught. By that I mean that I expected a kid who was cursing out another kid to stop when I told him to. Or a girl who was listening to her headphones to take them off per the rules when reminded. I expected kids to listen when I talked and not to interrupt each other. By compliance, I meant all of that and turn in your homework, too.

I fail to see how expecting that kind of compliance from students hinders out-of-the-box thinking or would hamper anyone from developing leadership skills.

It was not any part of "compliance" to have kids parrot some ideological party line or conform to anything other than basic standards of decency and application to study. And let me tell you, that was enough of a struggle. With 35 kids to teach, it's only when you have a calm, productive classroom environment that you can have meaningful education in a school.
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#79 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 02:41 AM
 
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Well, of course compliance is valued in school! I expected compliance when I taught. By that I mean that I expected a kid who was cursing out another kid to stop when I told him to. Or a girl who was listening to her headphones to take them off per the rules when reminded. I expected kids to listen when I talked and not to interrupt each other. By compliance, I meant all of that and turn in your homework, too.

I fail to see how expecting that kind of compliance from students hinders out-of-the-box thinking or would hamper anyone from developing leadership skills.

It was not any part of "compliance" to have kids parrot some ideological party line or conform to anything other than basic standards of decency and application to study. And let me tell you, that was enough of a struggle. With 35 kids to teach, it's only when you have a calm, productive classroom environment that you can have meaningful education in a school.
Really? Because I have a long list of examples from school - both my own and my son's where the expectation of compliance conveys/conveyed the message that it is easier to give the teacher what the want rather than think creatively, explore concepts thoroughly or challenge the ideas in a classroom. I'm not talking behavioural compliance (ie basic respect) but educational compliance.

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#80 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 02:47 AM
 
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For me, school is just one more option of educating my children. We have done homeschool, Montessori school, public school, private school, charter school and independent study between our 4 children. Each one was the best choice at the time for that child.

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#81 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 03:06 AM
 
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I think it's really hard to generalize... I don't think there's an answer that's true for every kid and every family, so it's more important to look at what any particular school has to offer for any particular kid and his family. School can be so many things... free childcare so parents can work or pursue their own goals or just get a break; a place where kids can meet others their age and see them on a regular basis and make long-term friendships; a place where kids can meet caring adults outside of their families; a place where kids can learn another language, or an art, or sport; a place where kids have access to supplies that their families don't have; a place where kids can gave access to learning specialists with knowledge the parents may not have; a place where kids can meet other people unlike themselves who they aren't otherwise meeting; a place where kids can be in a different role than they hold in their families; a place where kids feel like part of a supportive larger community... and more.

Every school won't do all of these things for every kids, and some schools may do none of them for some kids. Some kids and families may have access to all of these things outside of school... and some won't. Reading about other posters experiences can be helpful, but the real key is learning about your kid and your family and the educational options available to you, and going from there.
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#82 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 04:00 AM
 
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Really? Because I have a long list of examples from school - both my own and my son's where the expectation of compliance conveys/conveyed the message that it is easier to give the teacher what the want rather than think creatively, explore concepts thoroughly or challenge the ideas in a classroom. I'm not talking behavioural compliance (ie basic respect) but educational compliance.
That's too bad. I certainly had teachers like that in my public school experience, but thankfully the school my kids go to is not like that. They really do encourage kids to approach subjects their own ways or bring their own topics to the class. They do expect a modicum of educational compliance in teaching discrete subjects like math (2+2=4 and not 578 no matter how much my dd1 might want it to), but they are wide open to ideas that the kids bring to them about most subjects. I think it really depends on the teacher and to some degree the school.

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#83 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 10:45 AM
 
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I fail to see how expecting that kind of compliance from students hinders out-of-the-box thinking or would hamper anyone from developing leadership skills.
Yep.

My kids' middle school requires a certain amount of compliance, and they also have blocks of time built into the school day that aren't graded to encourage other types of thinking and creating, and a wide variety of extra acitivities to allow kids to enjoy different parts of who they are.

They do a lot of opened ended projects, such as learning Power Point by making a slide show about themselves.

The school isn't trying to make drones, they are helping the kids prepare for their futures while letting them celebrate who they are right now.

One of the things I like best about my kids' school is that the traditional subjects like math are covered (and covered well!) but that the day is broken up with all sorts of other things. It's a very balanced approached.

But none of that can happen if the kids are out of control!

The leadership skills thing is truly humerous to me in this conversation. You can't be a leader if you don't know how to function in a group or believe that rules are for other people. Learning leadership skills can ONLY happen after you learn to be around other people successfully! I don't think kids can really start to learn leadership until they are away from their parents and sibs for chunks of time. No body can really learn it at home -- school, scouts, or other activities are needed.

As I stated before, one of my DDs is a natural leader, but we didn't know that when she was homeschooling. She blossomed in public school.

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I think meemee spoke to the free childcare aspect
I think it is a put down to both teachers and parents when school is referred to as "free childcare."

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#84 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 11:40 AM
 
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#85 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 02:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
I think it is a put down to both teachers and parents when school is referred to as "free childcare."
I think for many parents this is the most important aspect of using a building school. Not all. And of course, not a factor for parents who use a private school.

My mom is a teacher and retired principal. When she started teaching I was in my mid-teens. She calculated if she were being paid the going rate for babysitting for each kid in the room, she'd make more money. (Of course a one-thirty ratio would never fly in childcare.)

There are great wonderful teachers in great wonderful schools providing a great deal more than childcare, but child care it is nonetheless, especially before children can stay home alone safely.

From a societal perspective, one of the important functions of school is that it provides a safe place for children while their parents work. That's perfectly fine. It doesn't put anyone down to acknowledge that, as all the moms I work with would be the first to attest. It gives working parents a good place for their kids and non-working parents a consistent break from the demands of care giving.

I've been thinking about the community aspects of homeschooling vs. schooling. And children learning to be members of a group.

I'm not sure that someone who visited our homeschooling community for only a year, especially if they were not planning to stay, would get to experience the depth of affection and support available. I think I might choose to use school if we were going to move around so my kids would have a "ready made" group of kids to hang out with. It takes longer to make connections among homeschoolers because of the lack of dailiness to the kid interactions.

When my 9 year old thinks about using school, it's the routine and the fact that she'd see the same kids every day that appeals to her. She's very social and competitive, so she (and we) seek environments where she meets those needs in consistent and constructive ways.

My 5 year old would be a kindergartener. At home she is building her community one by one, as is her preference. She is in groups by default because of her older sister, but consistently makes friends with one child and plays in a focused way with that person. She has a gymnastics class and Girl Scouts, which is all she wants.

Both kids like doing their academic stuff pretty privately.

I think when kids get to be "middle school" aged, they most often need opportunities to "spread their wings" a bit. The feedback I've heard from homeschooled kids who've used school is that late elementary is a great time in school, middle school is just awful and high school is great if you want to hunker down on academics.

Lots of the homeschooling families that we know don't fit the mom-stays-home-dad-works model. Maybe it's the economy; maybe just the area I'm in. Our homeschooling groups are about as diverse as the local private schools...so not as diverse as I'd like, but as good as I'd get with the groovy schools we'd likely choose if we were using school.

Long and short...If you have good safe schools with kind warm people in your area, they can provide a consistent group of kids and adults to get to know, with big rooms to use for projects (gyms, auditoriums) and provide opportunities to learn about things you haven't thought of or need a big groups of interested kids to pull off.

If you have a large, diverse, accessible homeschooling community, you can provide a flexible environment that gives each child a great deal of control over his/her day and provide opportunities to follow his or her interests and passions to their natural limit, while nurturing relationships with children and adults over the period of his/her childhood.
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#86 of 107 Old 01-29-2010, 03:48 PM
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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
I think it is a put down to both teachers and parents when school is referred to as "free childcare."
Really? I think chfriend covered a lot of ground on this issue, but I'm curious as to why you would see it as a put down. I was a teacher, remember, and this is also something I heard from grad school ed professors, so I think it's pretty accepted among teachers.

Providing a safe and free place for children to go while their parents work is truly an essential service for many families. If you have the privilege of not needing childcare in order to support your family then this wouldn't apply to you, but as for millions of families school keeps their kids from being sent to substandard childcare or simply roaming the streets.

For most kids and families (although not all), school provides more than that, but I don't understand why you would see a negative connotation to acknowledging the childcare aspect...

 
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#87 of 107 Old 02-02-2010, 05:54 AM
 
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I think that school serves to prepare kids for college. Many homeschooling families do wish for their children to attend college, which usually requires some regular class study, even if some independent study is available.

As an adult, I know a couple of homeschooled individuals who are trying to complete college degrees and can't seem to figure out how to work the system enough to complete the requirements. I know that this is not the case for the majority of homeschooled students who go on to college....but I'm just saying, going to school gives kids practice at handling a typical class situation.
Seems like this might be the typical scenario of ALL students.

In 2005, only 27% of the U.S. population age 25+ had a bachelor degree.

In any given class, roughly 50% of all college freshman never graduate.
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/09/09/bu...ardt.html?_r=1
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#88 of 107 Old 02-02-2010, 11:53 PM
 
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I thought of another thing school is useful for....for providing a community center around which families gather in support of their children. Whether it be an art show, a basketball game, or a play, often a whole community (at least in a rural area) comes out to support the kids and their effort. Parents, grandparents, aunts/uncles, child care providers, teachers. It is truly an awesome feeling to have so many people show up in support of the kids.

 
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#89 of 107 Old 02-03-2010, 06:49 PM
 
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Originally Posted by LoMaH View Post
Seems like this might be the typical scenario of ALL students.
true, and while it is sad when a person spends 12+ years in school and is unable to function in freshman classes due to either poor parenting or poor schooling or both, it's even sadder to me when a family puts a high priority on their children's education, makes sacrifices to provide what they think is best, and at the end discover that their child isn't able to function in college level courses.

(disclaimer -- I don't think everyone *needs* a degree or that it is guarantee of happiness or success)

Some homeschooled kids are ready for collage long before they turn 18, and some are far from it. Even defining who is a "homeschooler" is difficult because few children homeschool the whole time.

However, one advantage of a child attending a traditional school is knowing how they compare to their peers and how they measure up to what your state has set as the standards.

Writing is a subject I found particularly difficult to evaluate as a homeschooler. Because I couldn't see lots and lots of samples of my kids' peers writing, I had no idea if they were writing well for their age or if it was something I should work on more with them. Some homeschool moms swing too far one direction and push and push their kids far beyond what is generally expected of kids their age, and some go to far the other direction. I *personally* found it hard to be in the center because I didn't know where the center was.

In a related vein, knowing that my child is getting an A- in pre-algebra at a school that has great standardized test scores tells me something. She has to really work at math. When she was homeschooling, I only saw the struggle with math and I worried about her ability to do college level math when she gets there. I know I now that she is right on track and that her hard work is paying off.

This also relates to the sibling issue with homeschooling. My other DD is highly gifted in math. I didn't realize how far above average she was until she went to school, so I was comparing my child who has normal math ability to her highly gifted sister without realizing it.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#90 of 107 Old 02-04-2010, 02:24 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post


I think it is a put down to both teachers and parents when school is referred to as "free childcare."
I was a kindergarten teacher in a very low income area. Starting kindergarten as soon as possible was important to many of the families because they couldn't afford childcare - school served as the childcare. Califoria, where I live, has a very late kindergarten cut off date (Dec 10, I think) and there were some kids who would have best been served by waiting a year. I had more than one mom tell me that she couldn't afford preschool or childcare, and needed her child to be in school. It's unfortunate that the mom and kid are both put in that situation, that there isn't more subsidized daycare and preschool, etc, but for families living at or below the poverty line (and, really, for many families with higher incomes, too) daycare is very expensive and not something they could fit into their budget. It would mean not working, which would mean not covering living expenses, etc. Again, I think it is unfortunate that there aren't more options for working parents, but I never took it as a put down and neither did any of the teachers I knew. It was just a fact of many families economic situation.
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