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#61 of 140 Old 08-07-2010, 10:50 PM
 
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I'm pretty sure my kid was in a Title I school-- that's the special reading program, right? I know they had a reading specialist and some neat parent/child nights that were literacy based.
Title one means that a certain percentage of the children are low income, and the school therefore receives extra money. The school decides how to spend the money.

Our elementary was a title one school, and some of the money went for math and reading tutors. Normally, kids can only get special help if they have a LD and an IEP, but title one money can be used any way the school wants. Our school also used some of the money on music programs. All the kids have music a couple of times a week, and 4th grader (and up) learn to play the recorder.

<<And I guess my question/concern is, there are lots of working-class poor in America who maybe don't qualify for monetary help but still can't really afford all the public school fees. So what happens to them/ >>

I suspect it varies from place to place. In our district, if the family qualified for free/reduced lunch program, the school would have taken care of it. If not, the family would *most likely* be expected to come up with the money.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#62 of 140 Old 08-07-2010, 10:51 PM
 
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I'm pretty sure my kid was in a Title I school-- that's the special reading program, right? I know they had a reading specialist and some neat parent/child nights that were literacy based.
Actually a title I school is a school where a certain percentage of the student body qualifies for free or reduced lunch programs. Title I one schools are often confused with schools that are failing to meet state or federal test scores because children from lower income homes are at significantly higher risk of poor school performance and Title I school are often also poor performing schools as a result. But the designation of title I has little to do with past academics performance though it is targeted at increasing future academic performance.

Title I school qualify for more funding in part to help pay for some of the expenses people are talking about in this thread. The extra funding is often used for supplemental educational opportunities such as reading recovery teachers because, as mentioned previously, many of the students in these schools do need a little extra help in academic areas.

http://www2.ed.gov/programs/titleiparta/index.html

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#63 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 12:47 AM
 
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I work at a HS in IL.

The annual fee for all students is $120. Students who qualify for free/reduced lunch pay half.

We don't charge for textbooks to my knowledge, but I know that if you lose or damage your text then you are responsible for the cost to replace.

Driver Education is $150. Sports and a lot of the clubs cost $60 each, with a yearly max of $150 allowed to be charged due to extracurricular activities. A lot of the clubs, like band and student government, are exempt from the activity fee altogether.

Students are given supply lists from their individual teachers, and I haven't heard of anything crazy there. The only real pricey thing is the calculators required by our math courses. Kids have to buy a PE uniform and gym lock, too. But if a kid is halfway responsible and doesn't lose their calc, gym suit, etc, then these are one-time-only fees.

Busing is free, but kids who want to drive to school have to pay for a parking permit.

If students don't pay their fees, then they can't buy prom tickets as a senior. Plus, their official transcripts will not be released to any college until they are paid in full. We may even hold diplomas... I forget.


Overall, my school (which is 50% free / reduced lunch last time I checked) seems pretty generous with the initial outlay, but if kids lose / damage stuff? Like their student handbook, ID, etc? Then they're on their own and have to pay up for replacements. Seems fair to me. And if someone is truly in a tough spot I know arrangements have been made.

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#64 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:05 AM
 
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ALL kids are entitled to a "Free and appropriate public education." You don't have to pay for anything the school asks you to pay for. You can always get out of it. Sometimes in some schools is more of a pita to get out of it, or to prove you *can't* pay and in some schools it's easy.
I honestly don't think this is true in the district in which I work.

I mean, yes, kids can attend every day of high school without ever paying a dime. It's not like we're running credit checks on kids when they walk in the door.

But they will not get their diploma or their official transcript to prove that they have graduated until they pay their bill in full.

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#65 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:14 AM
 
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I'd be very upset if my child's school expected me to pay for school books or any fee to have them go to the school when it's a public school which should be free.

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#66 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:38 AM
 
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Let's look at what might be meant by "free education" (if such a law actually exists): I will admit I'm guessing here, but when that law was written (again, assuming), it most likely meant the very basics of reading, writing, arithmetic. It didn't mean "every kid gets to do sports, band and go on the class trip." Should every kid get these things? Sure, but it doesn't fall under what is guaranteed.

When the money isn't there from the state or districts for whatever reason, schools have no option but to charge the families that can pay and hope to get enough to cover some costs.

At our school, we do two big fundraisers a year (school-wide). One pays for a program that happens on Fridays where the kids go out in the community and get involved or do other fun things away from the building. The other one raised $9K last year for the PAC (think PTA without the membership fees). We had almost all that money left at the end of the year because the teachers weren't asking for funds for projects/class room learning/etc. I'm going to address this at our first meeting of the year next week. The year before, we bought really neat microscopes for one of the science classes (a class that all students in the building will go through at some point so it benefits everyone).

Annettemarie, I'd tell your friend to contact a lawyer regarding what the school district has done to her with the collections. I bet she can get a free consultation and can probably get the district to drop this crap pretty quick.

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#67 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:41 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by rabrog View Post
Let's look at what might be meant by "free education" (if such a law actually exists): I will admit I'm guessing here, but when that law was written (again, assuming), it most likely meant the very basics of reading, writing, arithmetic. It didn't mean "every kid gets to do sports, band and go on the class trip." Should every kid get these things? Sure, but it doesn't fall under what is guaranteed.
I would actually agree with this and would go one step further and say that if schools can't pay for the basics of an education, maybe they shouldn't even be attempting to provide the extras (and this is coming from someone whose homeschoolers participate in our school district's excellent strings program). But my biggest concern is that things like text books aren't extras.

And yes, I'm beginning to think this "right to free education" is something made up by the collective imagination. I can't find any documentation anywhere that it actually exists.

ETA: FTR, I would have no issues paying for things like yearbooks, directories, field trips, parking passes, classes that are above and beyond what's required (such as AP courses), things like that. But it seems counter-intuitive to me to make something compulsory and then charge people for it.

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#68 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:41 AM
 
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thanks for posting this! Ds still has 1 more year before K and we are still on the fence about either hsing or psing, so i have been researching this very subject.

Kansas

transportation: if a child live less than 2.5 miles from school and wants to ride a bus (we live about 1.5 miles from school) the fee is 280 a year, but apparently they give up to 25% discount for enrolling by a certain date, etc and etc, how confusing! If we wanted to bus him. Don't know yet, but leaning more toward walk/ride atm. Dh drop him and walk and pick him up...

so the bus at 25% discount would be 210$ for the year

school lunch is a whooping 2.10 at elementary level~we'd probably pack a lunch
milk is .45 a carton

lunch for full day+ milk= about 475 a year

Kindergarten supply list

* 1 box 500 count facial tissue, or 2 boxes 250 count
* 24 regular size #2 writing pencils with erasers
* 2 bottles of school glue, 4 oz., white only
* 2 glue sticks
* 1 box regular size crayons, 12-24 colors
* 2 yellow highlighters
* 1 package odorless dry erase markers
* 1 box large/medium zip-close bags
* 1 container of bleach-free disinfectant wipes
* Hand sanitizer

The following items will also be needed and can be reused throughout the grade levels, unless damaged:

* 1 old adult short- or long-sleeve shirt for painting (or paint smock or apron)
* 1 set of markers, basic colors, waterbase, odorless, non-fluorescent
* 1 backpack for carrying books and materials
* 1 school box or large pencil bag
* 1 pair blunt-end scissors
* Bring white sock for white-board eraser

25$ for supplies

At the time of enrollment, you will pay instructional materials fees: half-day kindergarten, $55; full-day kindergarten and grades 1 through 5, $70; and grades 6 through 12, $70. You may also:

* Purchase lunch tickets
* Purchase yearbooks
* Pay other miscellaneous fees, such as parking permits ($25 for high school)
* Purchase athletic passes ($5 for middle school students, $30 for high school students)

70$ fee here


my district has an optional full day Kindergarten for an extra FEE! There are 10 schools that offer it free, but the other 13 can attend a school for the extra 238 a month!

2380 here! It doesn't say anything about napping or if a mat is needed, but i'll add 10$ on for good measure 2390!


So if i wanted to put ds in this full day program and he rode the bus it would cost: 3170$!

now that being said, if we choose public school we will probably not do full day kindergarten, and the bus will be unlikely also, so the full day lunch is out too, so for us the kindergarten year will be relatively less brutal than some. But just trying to give an example of what it could cost. And that doesn't include and pictures, parties or field trips...

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#69 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:48 AM
 
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Two other things: textbooks are expensive. I worked the text department at our university bookstore and looked into purchasing texts when our church was working to open a school. When they get damaged/lost, it's expensive to replace them. Very few students do this on purpose, but repeated use especially by younger students just means replacing them more often. I don't agree with forcing a student to pay for books (rental), but I sure do understand it.

Also busing...fuel is expensive for buses. When the fuel cost goes up, the funds for busing dwindle rapidly. Our school only buses about 10 kids (lottery school so very few live in the area). Everyone else has to find transportation. The office puts up a signup sheet for carpooling at the beginning of the year so parents can connect if they need to.

I think more and more school districts are going to have to charge for basic things (books or locks). I hope that parents who can will step up and pay more to compensate for the students who truly can't afford it. America is becoming a third world country in many ways and I've wondered if there really isn't a way to stop it.

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#70 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 01:55 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm guessing another thing that makes the bussing situation tough is the fact that there are very few "neighborhood schools" anymore. When I was in K-3rd, I had a little school right across the street that everyone could walk to. Now there's one big complex everyone needs to find their way to.

As far as textbooks-- when my oldest was in school, all they had was a math worktext. Everything else was worksheets, done on the dry erase, or real books that never left the school.

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#71 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 02:00 AM
 
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I think more and more school districts are going to have to charge for basic things (books or locks). I hope that parents who can will step up and pay more to compensate for the students who truly can't afford it. America is becoming a third world country in many ways and I've wondered if there really isn't a way to stop it.
I don't think i would go that far, at least not most the schools i've seen in my area in the midwest. In India there are so few schools the kids have to go to schools on saturdays and there are 2 shifts every day for students, morning and afternoon, the afternoon ones not getting out of school until early evening. There are not enough schools to go around for all the kids that want to attend, there are lotteries to get into the best schools and then you pay the fees. (i know some schools do lottery here) But it's not anything like here. If a child is lucky enough to get to go to school in India that is a big deal and that is what made me understand the asian drive for school and learning. I respect that. It's not like here that you can just keep your kid at home and teach them, the literacy rate for females there is quite staggering, i believe under 50%. Just my 2 cents...Now back on topic...

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#72 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 06:00 AM
 
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In regards to school, yes, the information is available. In regards to other social services, I am sure this isn't going to be a popular opinion but you have to seek out the services, they won't come to you, its really not hard to find services for families.
All I can say is, it really depends.


Quote:


This is garbage and offensive and entirely not true.
Ooooh, you are right. I should have said, some rich people do not want to pay for poor people. Because how I put it was a gross generalization. There are many wealthy people who do a lot for the poor. But based on the votes on taxes... sigh.

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#73 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 12:25 PM
 
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All I can say is, it really depends.




Ooooh, you are right. I should have said, some rich people do not want to pay for poor people. Because how I put it was a gross generalization. There are many wealthy people who do a lot for the poor. But based on the votes on taxes... sigh.
I guess it depends on where you live and how much value the population puts on education.
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#74 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 04:15 PM
 
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I guess it depends on where you live and how much value the population puts on education.
If the population put that high a value on education, they would pay for levies that paid for equal education opportunities for all.

Of course some things will be paid for by the pupil, but access and basic subjects should be covered. Sports fees and field trips that are far and not directly related to education (i.e. to the capital, etc.) are not going to be able to be paid for by the district, but that's not what we're talking about here, is it?

And there are some really liberal, rich areas that spend a lot. There are also massively rich, conservative areas that spend very little because they are "attached" to slums. And there are many, many rich areas where they spend a lot, not only to pay for education, but to ensure that their district does not include a lot of poor people so they don't have to pay for that many extra kids. It happens all over. I think it is common.

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#75 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 05:41 PM
 
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The rich do not want to pay for the poor, so resent paying thousands in taxes PLUS supplies because they already pay for several kids to go to school. The poor do not want to pay for supplies because for many poorer families, public education is actually the ONLY benefit they get.
I find your broad generalizations to be extremely offensive.
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#76 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 05:44 PM
 
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And there are some really liberal, rich areas that spend a lot. There are also massively rich, conservative areas that spend very little because they are "attached" to slums. And there are many, many rich areas where they spend a lot, not only to pay for education, but to ensure that their district does not include a lot of poor people so they don't have to pay for that many extra kids. It happens all over. I think it is common.
Once again you are making sweeping generalizations. I think it is faulty reasoning to assume that only liberals are willing to pay for things like school districts that benefit both rich and poor.

I grew up in a very conservative part of the country in the Midwest yet we had one of the richest school districts and highest paid teachers in the nation due to high property taxes. Now, in that area that is no longer true due to some reallocation of funds (state robin hood laws) and due to some stagnation of the increases.

But I remember the objections to school bond issues being almost never about the money but more about the execution of the funds. I remember it being commonly acknowledged that a new high school was needed due to overcrowding. The only issues with the bond vote were about weather or not a brand new bigger high school would be built (and the old high school re-purposed as a junior high or sold to the local collect, or whatever), or a second high school, if a second high school were build would it be a second campus of the same school or a separate school, how big should it be, etc.

So if you believe that only liberals vote for school bond issue and conservatives are to selfish and greedy to vote for them you would be false in the community I grew up in. You would also be short-sighted and insulting to break it down to a simple sweeping political affiliation.

I also think people in this thread are oversimplifying when they are talking about voting for increases in property taxes and increasing school funding. 1. A simple property tax increase doesn't always work the way it should. Some states take money from richer districts above a certain amount and reallocate it to poorer districts in the state. 2. The people voting for the tax increase need to actually be convinced that more money would actually fix the problem, or that there is actually a need. 3. People need to agree on a solution. 4. People need to look at a whole picture not just the schools. For example in an area that already seems to have high property taxes, particularly in an area where home prices are perhaps lower due to poverty are increased taxes going to keep some people from being able to afford homes, or is going to cause rent to increase on some of the people who can least afford it.

So yea, lets just all vote for higher property taxes and more money for schools sounds like an easy solution. But lets be realistic and admit it's not that simple.

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#77 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 06:12 PM
 
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Once again you are making sweeping generalizations. I think it is faulty reasoning to assume that only liberals are willing to pay for things like school districts that benefit both rich and poor.

I grew up in a very conservative part of the country in the Midwest yet we had one of the richest school districts and highest paid teachers in the nation due to high property taxes. Now, in that area that is no longer true due to some reallocation of funds (state robin hood laws) and due to some stagnation of the increases.

But I remember the objections to school bond issues being almost never about the money but more about the execution of the funds. I remember it being commonly acknowledged that a new high school was needed due to overcrowding. The only issues with the bond vote were about weather or not a brand new bigger high school would be built (and the old high school re-purposed as a junior high or sold to the local collect, or whatever), or a second high school, if a second high school were build would it be a second campus of the same school or a separate school, how big should it be, etc.

So if you believe that only liberals vote for school bond issue and conservatives are to selfish and greedy to vote for them you would be false in the community I grew up in. You would also be short-sighted and insulting to break it down to a simple sweeping political affiliation.

I also think people in this thread are oversimplifying when they are talking about voting for increases in property taxes and increasing school funding. 1. A simple property tax increase doesn't always work the way it should. Some states take money from richer districts above a certain amount and reallocate it to poorer districts in the state. 2. The people voting for the tax increase need to actually be convinced that more money would actually fix the problem, or that there is actually a need. 3. People need to agree on a solution. 4. People need to look at a whole picture not just the schools. For example in an area that already seems to have high property taxes, particularly in an area where home prices are perhaps lower due to poverty are increased taxes going to keep some people from being able to afford homes, or is going to cause rent to increase on some of the people who can least afford it.

So yea, lets just all vote for higher property taxes and more money for schools sounds like an easy solution. But lets be realistic and admit it's not that simple.
I totally agree. Well said.
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#78 of 140 Old 08-08-2010, 07:22 PM
 
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Once again you are making sweeping generalizations. I think it is faulty reasoning to assume that only liberals are willing to pay for things like school districts that benefit both rich and poor.

I grew up in a very conservative part of the country in the Midwest yet we had one of the richest school districts and highest paid teachers in the nation due to high property taxes. Now, in that area that is no longer true due to some reallocation of funds (state robin hood laws) and due to some stagnation of the increases.

But I remember the objections to school bond issues being almost never about the money but more about the execution of the funds. I remember it being commonly acknowledged that a new high school was needed due to overcrowding. The only issues with the bond vote were about weather or not a brand new bigger high school would be built (and the old high school re-purposed as a junior high or sold to the local collect, or whatever), or a second high school, if a second high school were build would it be a second campus of the same school or a separate school, how big should it be, etc.

So if you believe that only liberals vote for school bond issue and conservatives are to selfish and greedy to vote for them you would be false in the community I grew up in. You would also be short-sighted and insulting to break it down to a simple sweeping political affiliation.

I also think people in this thread are oversimplifying when they are talking about voting for increases in property taxes and increasing school funding. 1. A simple property tax increase doesn't always work the way it should. Some states take money from richer districts above a certain amount and reallocate it to poorer districts in the state. 2. The people voting for the tax increase need to actually be convinced that more money would actually fix the problem, or that there is actually a need. 3. People need to agree on a solution. 4. People need to look at a whole picture not just the schools. For example in an area that already seems to have high property taxes, particularly in an area where home prices are perhaps lower due to poverty are increased taxes going to keep some people from being able to afford homes, or is going to cause rent to increase on some of the people who can least afford it.

So yea, lets just all vote for higher property taxes and more money for schools sounds like an easy solution. But lets be realistic and admit it's not that simple.
Yes! to everything you said. I couldn't agree more.

You are correct to say that many here are oversimplifying the issue of school funding. In my former life, before becoming a SAHM, my career was as a budget director for my state's community and technical college system. Before that I worked in the governor's office as a budget analyst--we prepared the Governor's annual executive budget that was voted on by the state legislature. The governor's budget staff was comprised of people with advanced degree's in law, political science, public administration, education policy, healthcare policy, public finance, accounting, etc. The formula for directing money to the counties' school districts was amazingly complex. It took years to fully understand all the ins and outs of school funding--there are a myriad of state laws and federal laws to take into account.

To make such generalizations as to political ideology or class affilitation is very insulting. I know many, many people who are conservation in their political beliefs yet don't define themselves as "conservatives" but rather as Americans and who work to make their communities better for all citizens.
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#79 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 01:29 AM
 
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I haven't read the whole thread, but here's my general input on the minimum I expect to spend per kid:

I wouldn't count the optional things like fundraisers. We are required to buy school supplies which generally run about $50 per kid per year. The school supply list generally includes money on top of that. For instance, we have between $13-25 per child in school fees for things like agendas and athletic fees. The athletic fees are higher in high school and more if your child participates in any specific sports.

There are generally field trip costs where parents are asked to pay for part of the bus fee and/or admission fees for the places they are going. Last year, my dd11, who was in 7th grade, had about $350 in field trip fees b/c they had an overnight which was a maybe $200 plus choir field trips, etc. My dd9, who will be a 5th grader this year, will have about the same in field trip fees this year due to an overnight again and then all of the standard day trips.

So, for absolutely requires fees, I'd say $400-450/child/year. In the interests of not being the parent who asks for scholarships for everything, I usually have approximately another $100/kid for things like the photography workshop that dd11 did through school for the past two years and similar extracurriculars. Dds did qualify for free lunch last year, but we didn't ask for or receive scholarships for anything b/c we felt that there were other kids who likely needed them more than ours.
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#80 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 02:22 AM
 
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So if i wanted to put ds in this full day program and he rode the bus it would cost: 3170$!
I don't think that fees for full day K count. I think it's more like day care. A K teacher once told me that the kids are so young at that point, they are really done my the time the half day is over and she thought the reason some teachers claim it is important is that it is about a zillion times easier to teach full day K than 2 half day Ks.

Full day K includes things like nap, play time, etc.

We've moved around a lot and what I see is that more monied areas tend to fund education very well. It keeps the property values up.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#81 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 02:25 AM
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Dd's fees for 9th grade were approx. $120. If you make little enough, they have fee wavers.

But she's getting a good education at that school, so in the words of my dh, "It's a bargain!"

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#82 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 10:09 AM
 
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None of these school fees seem outrageous to me. I haven't been in school for 20 years, but I can remember paying extra fees for music, athletics, gym clothes, art supplies, busing, books and school supplies. We bought lab notebooks and paid for field trips. We paid for hot lunches and milk.

The only thing I see as being new is the proliferation of hand sanitizer and kleenex.

And many of you have said that their are fund raisers to help cover costs of extras and many low-income families have access to free school supplies.



My question is to those of you who are upset by the fees -- What is a reasonable price for a child's education? Do you really expect to pay nothing?

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#83 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 10:23 AM
 
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I would also note that this is not a good time for America's public programs. Paul Krugman did a terrific article in the NYtimes this past weekend about the layoff of public school teachers, the reduction of police officer patrols, the removal of streets that can no longer be maintained. The streets are being torn up and returned to gravel since it is cheaper to dump gravel that fix the old roads. Schools in HAwaii have drastically cut back on the school days. Kids are simply left with no where to go.

Our basic, government-provided 'essentials' are not what they used to be. There is simply not enough money to educate each child fully without asking for more money from parents. And to blame the rich for not funding the poor doesn't work right now. Even the rich are broke and out of jobs.

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#84 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 11:06 AM
 
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The term "free and appropriate education" comes from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which means it's geared towards students with special needs.

For students without disabilities, all I could find was that the US public education system came about through cumpulsary education laws that went through the country in the late 1800s. I even found one little blurb that says that some places do (or did) have the authority to take kids away from the parents if they were considered unfit to have them educated properly (or something like that.) I guess the idea of free education comes from the thinking that if you are going to require that ALL kids get educated, you have to make it so that all kids can afford to get educated, since apparently most schools before the late 1800s were private with tuitions required.

I am in Indiana. Here, we do pay textbook rental fees. They vary by grade and classes taken. Last year my dd was in 8th grade and she ended up with an additional $20 fee because she was in Japanese as her forgien language, so the textbook was more. We do not however pay bussing fees. Although some districts are considering it around here, it's all over the news. School supply lists-in elementary school they were pretty enormous. And what bothered me is that most of the stuff on them was for classroom supplies, though it didn't specifiy that on the list. Things like boxes of kleenex and such were obvious, but even if you purchased a package of pencils, it wasn't a package for your kid, it was for a classroom supply of pencils. Crayons, scissors etc etc, all that was put into the classroom supply box. That always irritated me.

On the other hand, I discoverd one year that if you don't get the stuff on the list, nothing really happens-I got to the store like the day before school started and they were out of half the stuff on the list. So I ended up making sure that she had her folders and enough pencils and such for her to do her own work and then sent her with whatever else I COULD find on the list. And nothing was ever said about what wasn't sent.

With textbook rental fees, I seem to recall that most schools do have some sort of program for assistance for those who can't pay.
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#85 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 12:02 PM
 
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I would also note that this is not a good time for America's public programs.
Last year some states didn't give the districts all the money they owed them because they just didn't have it.

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The term "free and appropriate education" comes from the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, which means it's geared towards students with special needs.
yes, and the rest of the phrase is "in the least restrictive environment possible." This is the law that means that kids with special needs (such as my DD with autism) get access to the same level of education as other children, even though doing so cost more money and is more difficult.

It is one of the wonderful things about our country and many countries, even developed countries, don't do this. The intent of this law has nothing to do with what are truly small fees compared to what a the kind of programs cost for kids with profound special needs.

A therapeutic school for kids with autism is about 25K a year. This is the law that means that parents don't have to choose between coming up with that kind of money or just not educating their child.

It has nothing to do with $20 text book fees.

but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#86 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 12:42 PM
 
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I don't think that fees for full day K count. I think it's more like day care. A K teacher once told me that the kids are so young at that point, they are really done my the time the half day is over and she thought the reason some teachers claim it is important is that it is about a zillion times easier to teach full day K than 2 half day Ks.

Full day K includes things like nap, play time, etc.
This is totally an aside, but this depends on where you are, too. In our school, they only have naptime for the first few weeks while the kids are transitioning to school. After that, no naps. And they only get free play time a few times a week. I wish it were more like daycare for part of the day, but it is not.
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#87 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 12:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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This is totally an aside, but this depends on where you are, too. In our school, they only have naptime for the first few weeks while the kids are transitioning to school. After that, no naps. And they only get free play time a few times a week. I wish it were more like daycare for part of the day, but it is not.
In our school district, it's full day and they sit at desks. No nap mats in our kindys.

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#88 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 12:56 PM
 
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Homeschooling this year, last year, we public schooled. I spent thousands of dollars. For middle school and above, you have to pay fees for electives. But you cannot just chose to not have electives. Plus high schoolers were all required to have their own computers, printers, printing paper, ink, and internet at home. They got quite mad at you if you did not purchase the school provided school supplies. They were about $80. But you could go out and purchase them yourself. But that cost still maybe $60.

Fundraisers are sort of optional. You cannot keep your child from going to the daily pep rallies for it. Nor can you stop the peer pressure they do for it. You know, where they put up a poster of all the kids and how much money each has raised. Then they offer a class prize for the class that makes the most and everyone knows your child made none. Then your child is forced to sit through watching all the other kids get cheap plastic prizes and be the only one left out. You cannot opt out of any of that. So while technically, you do not have to give for the fundraisers, your child is ostracized over it. Did I mention the "fun" fall festival they set up during the week and let the kids see it and tell them all about it, but then charge $10 just to get in the door and then additional money for tickets to do anything once in the door? I could not seem to justify paying a $10 entry fee for my 1 month old baby.

I actually skipped the fundraisers, but had to deal with the fall out. I also did not approve of how they were spending the money.
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#89 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 04:49 PM
 
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We have an average supplies list, and we also have to pay $300 a month for all day Kindergarten. Half-day is free.
This is our exact situation + we also have anywhere from $15-40 in fees (depends on the grade) at the beginning for special mag subscriptions, art sketch books, etc.

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#90 of 140 Old 08-09-2010, 04:56 PM
 
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Full day K includes things like nap, play time, etc.
Off topic, but Full Day K really varies...at our school they do get more recesses, but there is no nap/rest time. They also get access to specials (art, music and PE) that are standard in grades 1-6, but not in 1/2 day K
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