Two Studies on ADHD and Young for Grade - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 9 Old 09-03-2010, 12:12 AM - Thread Starter
 
umsami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Capital City
Posts: 9,943
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Saw this and thought it might be an important read for those considering Kindergarten... as well as some who may already have an ADHD-dx child.

http://www.scientificamerican.com/bl...med-2010-08-17

Quote:
she and her colleagues found that "being young for [a] grade more than doubles the change that a student is diagnosed with or treated for ADHD." And as they pointed out in their paper, "ADHD is an underlying neurological problem and incidence rates should not change dramatically from one birth date to the next."

Mom to DS(8), DS(6), DD(4), and DS(1).  "Kids do as well as they can."

umsami is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 9 Old 09-03-2010, 07:46 AM
 
meetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 753
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We have been fairly sure our son has some form of ADHD since he was two. That doesn't change his readiness for kindergarten. There will ALWAYS be a youngest kid and an oldest kid. Some kids thrive being the oldest others thrive being the youngest. Honestly I think all this redshirting out is getting out of hand. Someones kid will be the youngest in the class...
meetoo is offline  
#3 of 9 Old 09-03-2010, 11:20 AM - Thread Starter
 
umsami's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: Capital City
Posts: 9,943
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
That's not what the article is saying. It's saying that kids who are the youngest have a much higher likelihood of being diagnosed as ADHD--when for a good percentage of them, it has to do with age rather than actual ADHD behavior. The article is very clear that there are still plenty of kids who actually have the disease--but as many as 20% may be misdiagnosed simply by being younger than their peers--and thus being viewed as having inappropriate behavior. That equals to a whole host of kids being labeled and potentially put on meds that they have no business being on. It's not saying that your child's ADHD isn't real.

Mom to DS(8), DS(6), DD(4), and DS(1).  "Kids do as well as they can."

umsami is offline  
#4 of 9 Old 09-03-2010, 12:53 PM
 
meetoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 753
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My issue is it just encourages more red shirting. If a parent doesn't believe their child has ADHD they absolutely should speak up about it. Drs. should be looking at that study when determining if a child really does have ADHD. Parents however, should not be using that study as a basis for more redshirting.
meetoo is offline  
#5 of 9 Old 09-04-2010, 10:57 PM
 
junipermuse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
I actually think the fact that there is so much redshirting contributes to the problem. When half of the children in a kindy class are actually old enough to be first graders it encourages the school to push first grade expectations onto kindergartners. The answer isn't hold your kid back, its have realistic expectations of what a young five can handle in terms of sitting still, etc.

Jennifer, mama to darling dancing Juliette, and sweet baby Jameson
junipermuse is offline  
#6 of 9 Old 09-04-2010, 11:28 PM
 
Geofizz's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Running with the dingos!
Posts: 7,987
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)
Hey, look, we can make this problem of quick (and possibly wrong) diagnosis worse.

Geofizz is offline  
#7 of 9 Old 09-05-2010, 11:03 AM
 
karne's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 3,558
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by junipermuse View Post
I actually think the fact that there is so much redshirting contributes to the problem. When half of the children in a kindy class are actually old enough to be first graders it encourages the school to push first grade expectations onto kindergartners. The answer isn't hold your kid back, its have realistic expectations of what a young five can handle in terms of sitting still, etc.
I think that this is backwards in some ways----"redshirting" (hate that term, and feel it's very disrespectful to children, always surprised to see it in such general use on MDC, BTW) hasn't encouraged the schools to push first grade expectations on 5's as much as NCLB, lawmakers making educational policy, school districts where play and recess are seen as optional, etc.
karne is offline  
#8 of 9 Old 09-05-2010, 01:52 PM
 
junipermuse's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 1,130
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by karne View Post
I think that this is backwards in some ways----"redshirting" (hate that term, and feel it's very disrespectful to children, always surprised to see it in such general use on MDC, BTW) hasn't encouraged the schools to push first grade expectations on 5's as much as NCLB, lawmakers making educational policy, school districts where play and recess are seen as optional, etc.
I'm sorry, but I think "redshirting" is very accurate. I suppose on an individual level, once in a blue moon a child might really need an extra year to mature, but on the whole keeping a child home an extra year is a practice done by mainly wealthy or otherwise privileged white families to gain advantage for their child in the school setting, because they will be older and more mature. Studies have shown its not actual age that affects how well children do in kindergarten, but it clearly shows that children that are relatively older based on the ages of children in the class almost always have an advantage over the youngest in the class. The youngest in the classes (no matter when the cutoff age) are usually the children of families with the least resources. An extra year of daycare is too expensive or they would be sitting at home not doing much of anything to actually prepare them for going to school the next year.

And while yes the standards are generally set by the state or NCLB laws, teachers usually have to teach to the middle of the class. But in communities with lots of children starting Kindy a year late, the average is really skewed. I was a preschool teacher and good friends of the family with a little boy with a June birthday (in a school with a September cutoff) and he was the youngest boy in the class. Most boys in the class were an entire year older than him and the curriculum in the class reflected it. When a third of the kids are capable of first grade work a good teacher supplies them with work that's appropriate to their ability. But I think that children working at kindergarten level may easily internalize the fact that they aren't given the harder work as "I'm not smart" or "I'm not good at school"

Keep in mind though that my experience is in very affluent urban areas where "redshirting" is very very common. Where the decision often is as arbitrary as "my kid has a summer birthday, so I'll wait another year" This isn't about one or two kids who may actually need a little bit more time. My concern is how mass "redshirting" affects the less fortunate kids who's parents don't have the same resources to give them the "gift of time"

Jennifer, mama to darling dancing Juliette, and sweet baby Jameson
junipermuse is offline  
#9 of 9 Old 09-10-2010, 02:25 PM
 
Zoesmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 133
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'll have to give it a read in a little while. DD's Dr was questioning the family history of ADD/ADHD when dd talked non stop through the whole appointment. She could see she was able to concentrate but I agree she does have some lack of concentration issues. More out of boredom. She is pretty advanced in school even though due to her birth month she met cut offs for K when she was just barely 5. She was ready, reading and everything but now she does seem to have ADD moments where she has trouble paying attention. In the public school she finished 1st grade in last year her teacher said she played in her desk a lot. I can see why she did it she didn't need a lecture on phonics she has known since K. The school had not resources for advanced programs for reading or math.

I have seen where holding back boys has made a difference. It didn't seem to do much with what they knew but in how they could concentrate.

My dd young age to the rest of the class didn't seem to cause her any disadvantage. I think redshirting has caused even more problems in my opinion. That the schools require so much more out of Kinders than in the past. I think it should be used on a case by case situation. Some boys are much to physical to sit and learn in the same manner as other. It would be ideal to have different learning styles incorporated into the class. I believe highly physical(even to hyper active) boys can learn its just not going to be in a manner of sitting at a desk. They can learn counting and adding while running, jumping and playing. Its just hard to really meet all the students needs when class sizes get so large.

Melissa mama to Zoë 7/26/03
Zoesmama is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off