distractable 7yo in the classroom - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 10 Old 02-07-2011, 04:52 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I am looking for book recommendations (geared towards parent and/or child) on helping my sensitive, intelligent, easily distracted, dreamy 7 year old boy who likes to think a lot and do things on his own time cope with functioning in group settings and with schedules beyond his control, especially in school.

 

He's having trouble staying focused and on task. I think it is starting to drive his teacher bonkers. Having dealt with this all his life, I can empathize with both him and his teacher. Bottom line: I want my kid to love learning at school, and I'd like for him to respect the teacher and the classroom community by doing his best to stay on task. Anyone BTDT and have favorite books?

 

Since it may come up: no, he has never been tested for ADD. The teacher hinted that I should consider talking to his doctor, but I hesitate to follow up on that, but don't know why.

 

And also since it may come up: yes, we think he would thrive in an unschooling homeschool environment, and while we are open to it at some point down the road we are committed to staying in the public school system for now.

 

TIA


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#2 of 10 Old 02-07-2011, 06:26 PM
 
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Inattentive Type ADHD

 

Focus Pocus - 100 Ways to Help Your Child Pay Attention.


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
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#3 of 10 Old 02-10-2011, 06:37 AM
 
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My ds is adhd-inattentive.  One thing we are trying... and it is the first week we have tried this and it is itbs tests this week, so not sure of true results... a balance disk that he sits on to stay focused.  It was recommended by his OT and it works well when he sits on it for OT.  

 

I think, if he is having problems to the degree that you are stating, you could ask the school to evaluate him.  You may also ask your dr. for a referral to a psychologist to have them assess his learning skills based on what the school finds.  

 

Emmeline II, I keep trying to read that website you posted, and figure it has been very helpful for you, but I find the layout to hard to deal with.  I am not ADHD, but it makes me feel that way.  Is it a book, a website, or an ebook?  Does the hocus pocus have the same layout as the page advertising?  All I see is bold text and yellow, which to me is distracting.  

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#4 of 10 Old 02-10-2011, 04:24 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by melissa17s View Post

Emmeline II, I keep trying to read that website you posted, and figure it has been very helpful for you, but I find the layout to hard to deal with.  I am not ADHD, but it makes me feel that way.  Is it a book, a website, or an ebook?  Does the hocus pocus have the same layout as the page advertising?  All I see is bold text and yellow, which to me is distracting.  



There is a lot of information but I pick a link from the left and then start reading articles one by one. Focus pocus is a downloadable book--I haven't gotten it yet.


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
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#5 of 10 Old 02-11-2011, 05:56 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the link Emmaline. I gave up on the website pretty quickly though... it seemed more focused on selling the book than helping folks. If you do get the book, I'd love to hear whether or not you find it as helpful as they say. And in the meantime maybe I'll go back and focus on those links you pointed towards.

 

I think my biggest issue is that although he has obvious trouble focusing sometimes he can focus just fine other times (esp when he chooses to). We always seem to find a solution or tool to help him just before I seek outside help. On the one hand I don't want to make a big deal of something that is normal for DS when we are wading though life without major troubles, but on the other hand I don't want to ignore a problem when a little guidance and some simple changes could make school and life easier for him.

 

I did make an appointment for a consult with our pediatrician next week. 


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#6 of 10 Old 02-11-2011, 06:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtbuko View Post
I think my biggest issue is that although he has obvious trouble focusing sometimes he can focus just fine other times (esp when he chooses to). We always seem to find a solution or tool to help him just before I seek outside help. On the one hand I don't want to make a big deal of something that is normal for DS when we are wading though life without major troubles, but on the other hand I don't want to ignore a problem when a little guidance and some simple changes could make school and life easier for him.

 

I did make an appointment for a consult with our pediatrician next week. 

If he isn't functioning well in school but this is where you are going to keep him then it is a "big deal"--but it doesn't have to be treated that way--"we're going to try X and see if it helps you focus on your work at school" or "we're going to see X and she's going to help us think of tools to use to help you focus in school."


Being able to focus sometimes, particularly with topics of interest, is consistent with ADD. It's not being able to focus consistently when necessary (as in school) that is the problem--ds can play Lego Star Wars, build elaborate "machines" out of twigs/toy pieces/string, and watch Ben 10 for hours. Also, he has fewer attention/behavior issues in his favorite classes, Art and Computers.

 

I know some children are sensitive to thinking that something is "wrong" with them and that is a consideration--ds isn't like that though.


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
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#7 of 10 Old 02-11-2011, 09:18 AM
 
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Another factor is that a very slight inattention at the wrong moment could make it incredibly hard to follow what's going on which would make it even harder to pay attention

 

Especially if it feels like it's something that has no relevance to the student's life.

 

I bet most of us reading this thread have no problems paying attention for 10 minutes, right? I figure for some kids paying attention in class can end up being a bit like watching the following http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2tTviAdifUw&feature=related is for us. (Note, the lecturer is quite clear and a bit amusing, and has excellent visual aids but I certainly couldn't ONLY watch the lecture = D)

 

Just something to keep in mind any time we feel like being able to focus in one situation means someone should be able to focus in any other situation.

 

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#8 of 10 Old 02-11-2011, 04:28 PM
 
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Is the school work at an appropriate level to hold his interest?  If it is either too difficult or too easy, then it is normal for him to loose focus.


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#9 of 10 Old 02-25-2011, 06:20 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Update: had consult with ped who gave us (me, DH and teacher) forms to fill out and then she analyzed and we go back in to discuss the week after next. Per her message it sounds like the teacher's form lands DS more squarely in ADD diagnosis land than my form and DH's. I have requested most of our library's ADD collection to look over before then. Thanks to all who posted and encouraged us to go in.


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#10 of 10 Old 02-26-2011, 08:49 AM
 
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It's very common for the ratings scale filled out by the school, and the parent's form, to differ.  If you think about it, the level of focus and attention a child uses in a home situation is vastly different than that of a school setting.  What's asked of a child in school requires more sustained attention, energy, and focus.  Home is different.  As parents, we also make our home situations "work" for our kids, so some of the issues seen in other environments can look different at home.  

 

 

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