Does anyone know how to 'skip HS' and go straight to college? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
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#31 of 40 Old 06-23-2011, 08:57 PM
 
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#32 of 40 Old 06-24-2011, 09:51 PM
 
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Originally Posted by meemee View Post

oh yes there is always a way. as long as you are willing to jump thru the hoops.

 

a 13 year old had to take a couple of classes to prove herself and now she has been admitted to Oregon State this fall still at 13 as a freshman. and yes she is profoundly gifted. she scored above and beyond her classmates in the classes she took last semester. 
 

so as others have pointed out - if your child is outstanding then yes you are allowed to start univ. 

 

I don't think your child has to be profoundly gifted to get in.  I mean, certainly they need to meet the prerequisites, but my point was that it wasn't necessary to have a regularly earned diploma to get there before 18yo.  Homeschooled kids finish high school and start college at 16 and 17 on a relatively regular basis.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by miriam View Post

The CSU near me has at least 50 sections of remedial math and English classes every semester for underclassmen.  

 

Why are these college students taking remedial classes in the most basic of classes if they were admitted to the university?  Why were they admitted?  

 

What were they doing in high school that makes them so low achievers?

 

If college classes are so challenging, why the remedial classes and why are they so full?  What did they do or learn in high school?


Every state has a different set of standards in terms of what's acceptable.  In college, they all have to be at the same level and if they're not--they go into remedial to get to that level.  They may NOT have been low achievers in high school--just that their school's (or state's) standards weren't as high as the standards of the college.   And really, I don't think anyone (including the teacher's unions) disputes that the current system is not exactly working well for the majority.

 

The colleges may have seen some other talent or achievement in those students that was worth having them admitted--knowing they could catch them up in reading and math.  It would be easier to have them spend a year in remedial courses and turn out a well-rounded student with exceptional skills in something other than reading or math than to just reject scores of kids because of something that can be "fixed".

 

FWIW, corporate America has a panel that attempted to work with public education for similar reasons: they were forced to "teach" the workforce things that should've been learned in school.  I was a teacher during that time (it wasn't long ago) and while the media caught what looked like cooperation and willingness to take feedback and work with it, that wasn't exactly the sentiment among the majority of the ranks--who felt that "those people knew nothing about teaching/didn't understand".  That was pretty much how they felt about anyone that wasn't a teacher--and if it was a teacher, they didn't teach in this kind of district or at that age level or in that subject area or they might have been too new to teaching or teaching too long... ridiculous.  Obviously not ALL teachers feel/felt this way; but the majority that I worked with (in two districts--one very affluent, the other, notsomuch) and know (from multiple districts) are in that bucket. 


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#33 of 40 Old 06-24-2011, 11:54 PM
 
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The OP was talking of skipping high school and so it can be assumed that she's talking about a 13/14-year-old who has not completed the high school curriculum. The child this poster was referring to was 13. That's quite different from a 16 or 17-year-old who has finished high school early (and it's not that uncommon with public schoolers either.) A 13-year-old would need to be quite exceptional to move straight into the university and I've yet to hear of a non PG child doing that.

 

 

 

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Originally Posted by heatherdeg View Post

I don't think your child has to be profoundly gifted to get in.  I mean, certainly they need to meet the prerequisites, but my point was that it wasn't necessary to have a regularly earned diploma to get there before 18yo.  Homeschooled kids finish high school and start college at 16 and 17 on a relatively regular basis.


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#34 of 40 Old 06-25-2011, 05:23 AM
 
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I was 17 in college...most people with early birthdays will be, I'd imagine.  I never skipped any grades...I just graduated high school at 17 and started college before my 18th birthday simply because I had a September birthday.  That's a whole heck of a lot different than having a 14 year old in college....  

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Originally Posted by ChristaN View Post



 


While I agree that I'd look more into what you're considering, OP, and reconsider that HS is useless across the board, I would hate to see this discussion turn into an arguement that all young college students are socially inept or immature.  One of the issues that should be seriously considered when skipping a grade (or more) is the social aspect and how the child fits with older kids. 

 

Yes, I too have seen gifted kids who were academically needing acceleration but for whom skipping grades was probably not the best way to make that happen b/c they didn't fit socially once skipped.  I've also seen some "old soul" types of younger kids who did better socially post skipping.  I went to high school with one of them and I believe that my 12 y/o, who is starting HS in the fall, is one.  Same age peers have never been good peers/friends for her b/c she is emotionally an "old soul" for want of a better way to put it.  Older kids/teens are the ones with whom she's had real rapport and they have accepted her as a peer.  She's fit tremendously better since being accelerated and I had numerous teachers in her middle school tell me that moving her ahead was a good choice b/c she is "mature." (nothing illicit winky.gif

 

We are, of course, not looking @ her being in college at 14, but 16 going on 17. 
 

 



 


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#35 of 40 Old 06-25-2011, 05:51 AM
 
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That's the same spot I was in with a Sept bd.  I started at 17 and turned 18 in Sept.  My dd is a year younger.  She, too, has a Sept bd and she also skipped a grade so she will be starting college at 16 and turning 17 her freshman year.  And I agree, it is very different than having a 14 y/o start college full time.  However, there are 14 y/os for whom that is an okay or even good decision.  We'd just need to know more about the OP's situation to know if that is the case for her dc.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by AllyRae View Post


I was 17 in college...most people with early birthdays will be, I'd imagine.  I never skipped any grades...I just graduated high school at 17 and started college before my 18th birthday simply because I had a September birthday.  That's a whole heck of a lot different than having a 14 year old in college....  



 



 

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#36 of 40 Old 06-26-2011, 03:19 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miriam View Post

The CSU near me has at least 50 sections of remedial math and English classes every semester for underclassmen.  

 

Why are these college students taking remedial classes in the most basic of classes if they were admitted to the university?  Why were they admitted?  

 

What were they doing in high school that makes them so low achievers?

 

If college classes are so challenging, why the remedial classes and why are they so full?  What did they do or learn in high school?

 

Remedial could be a very relative term in college, remedial math could be calculus or pre-calculus for hard science and math types. Remedial English could similarly be catching kids up on things like citation, literary analysis, etc. Unfortunately NCLB doesn't always mesh well with college preparedness
 

 

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#37 of 40 Old 06-26-2011, 10:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delilah83 View Post

Remedial could be a very relative term in college, remedial math could be calculus or pre-calculus for hard science and math types. Remedial English could similarly be catching kids up on things like citation, literary analysis, etc. Unfortunately NCLB doesn't always mesh well with college preparedness

Remedial in the california systems means starting with second grade math. i have tutored in remedial math and its mostly for returning students after a break in math. at least here i see remedial students are mostly returning students. what you are talking about in the UC and CSU systems are prereqs. here.  at least in the city where i am that is true. 

 

considering that one doesnt have to be sufficient in their subjects in their grades shows up in college. i have helped correct some essays and seriously i have been shocked at the result even after visiting the writing help lab. 

 


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#38 of 40 Old 06-27-2011, 08:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by miriam View Post

The CSU near me has at least 50 sections of remedial math and English classes every semester for underclassmen.  

 

Why are these college students taking remedial classes in the most basic of classes if they were admitted to the university?  Why were they admitted?  

 

What were they doing in high school that makes them so low achievers?

 

If college classes are so challenging, why the remedial classes and why are they so full?  What did they do or learn in high school?



There could be several reasons. Like the PP, returning students could be part of it. I didn't take any remedial classes in college but if I had to go back today, you bet I'd be sitting in some math classes. You have to allow for students to have weaknesses. I know some brilliant scientist whose writing skills are terrible. I know phenomenal writers who's math is weak. A kid can have all "A's" and major accomplishments but perhaps took lower level maths or never took the particular science he needs, ect. His or her strengths can still be attractive to a university and they can still grow into successful members of society. State universities need to consider the schools feeding into them as well. Do they never accept a child from a weak high school.... even if they can see that the child could really soar with quality education? Kids shouldn't be penalized because they were stuck with an over-crowded, under-funded school. If they did the very best they could do in the situation they came from, they deserve a shot.

 

50 classes sounds like a lot but consider that your average state college offers thousands of classes. 50 is really a blip.

 

I have to say though, I would not want to send my young teenager to the university to take high school classes in place of high school. Like I mentioned before, our area has middle college through the communty college but they are taking college level class for high school credit. I would not send my child to college in hopes that they'd get high school level instruction.

 

 


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#39 of 40 Old 07-01-2011, 05:41 PM
 
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#40 of 40 Old 07-01-2011, 06:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Debnicolai View Post

 

We have heard of situations when a student can skip HS altogether and replace it with a pre college program, Middle College, or 'other'...

 

Does anyone have any information or experience in this area? What works, what does not, what options exist??? Any info is very much appreciated.

 

Deb

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It doesn't sound to me like she is thinking of packing her son off to college and live in the dorms when he is 14. I think maybe she means something more like an alternative HS program, like middle college, which I have never heard of but sounds like some type of HS/college hybrid? http://mmc.geneseeisd.org/what%20is%20an%20Early%20college.htm

 

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