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#61 of 221 Old 07-01-2011, 08:24 PM
 
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Eh, it's only an hour a day for setting up lessons for 2 preschoolers and a 2nd grader.  It's not actually that much at all.  But yes, during that hour, I read through the next day's lessons for the 2nd grader, gather all the necessary equipment so it's set out, and put out new montessori works for the preschoolers (or create the work).  I also spend a good deal of time reserving various library books each week to compliment the various subjects, and making a shopping list of things we will need each week to complete the lessons.  An hour a day is not really a lot of planning time for homeschooling.  But for me, I haven't found homeschooling to be the "easy way"...homeschooling in our family is either very montessori based for the younger kids, or really working on the academics for the older one (who has asperger's and thrives on a very structured routine homeschooling schedule).  But each family will be different...some families likely don't read through all of the lessons, don't create their own montessori work, and don't set out all of the materials needed for that day ahead of time.  Some people are more seat of their pants.  Some people have a library system where you can walk in and get any book you need without having to reserve it from the larger system and get it delivered to your branch.  I have to have my hour or two planning each evening after the kids go to bed because it keeps me accountable and makes sure that I am teaching what I need to teach effectively.  We are not fly by the seat of our pants homeschoolers.  While we do follow the child's interests, I do have a set list of things I want to accomplish each year, and both my children and I thrive on a well prepared environment.  So yeah, it does take at least that long each night, plus planning time on the weekends too.  I definitely see how it wouldn't be same for other homeschoolers--those using an e-curriculum, unschoolers, or even those using an all-in-one curriculum.
 

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this seems way too long - IMO unless you are making up your own curriculum -even that would be too large of time too me

 

my state only requires days not hours so it is less---180 days are required--out of 360 that is easy and "days" is up to what your evaluator deems it to be

 

same way my state only requires "progress" so that means no testing EACH year-we have no mandates either



 


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#62 of 221 Old 07-01-2011, 08:36 PM
 
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Stormbride...very very interesting, thank you!!  Yeah, Ohio's a bit different than that...there is a list of subjects that must be covered, and those subjects are the same for kindergarten as it is for high school.  I was fairly surprised as well because some of it seems a bit heavy for a 2nd grader (like Ohio History...there aren't any good curricula for children under upper-el here for Ohio history, so I had to take a few different fact books and put together something.  Today we also spent a good 3 hours at the Ohio History Museum reinforcing this week's lessons on mastidons & the ice age. LOL!)

 

5-6 hours goes by fast...that includes the time I'm teaching piano, or giving a english lesson (which takes for.e.ver with him because my son has a delay in writing and spelling, so a lot of our english lessons involve editing and relearning what his former school never taught him).  Science takes a really long time too, because every unit involves some pretty heavy hands-on work.  I do a lot of reading of the lessons with him...I'd say we spend at least 30 minutes reading from Story of the World, and then another 30-45 minutes doing a craft together from it.  We've been working on emotions for the last 3 weeks in health (again, autism...takes longer to get some of these concepts. ;-) ), and we did a lot of dramatic representations of emotions.  Add to it, when DS is doing independent work, I'm giving montessori lessons to the other two (only during the first 2 hours...then they're playing in the room next to us or doing craft projects or playing outside).  I mean, there was one day where even after 6 hours of lessons, DS wanted me to work with him to make a model of the Great Wall of China using craft foam bricks...that took 3.fricken.hours (he wanted to keep working...I had to duck out after an hour to make dinner and take care of the littles, but I did go back every 15 minutes to help).

 

So yeah, we spend our day homeschooling, and then by late afternoon, we're at the lake or at martial arts or messing around outside or otherwise having fun.  But since he did go to school for a couple years, he was used to that.  And no way did he waste hours a day at school either.  He was working equally as long there.


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#63 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 05:08 AM
 
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fact is some can't, some can--doesn't make a parent any less-making my comments is not directed at any one------seems just to be a general fact

 

can't cut it- doesn't work, not working out---meaning all the same - NOT that the parent (s) are failing 

 

as I posted, some can find the negative no matter what and disregard the positive 

 

 


I think the point is there are negative aspects to homeschooling for everyone though. As much as some people don't like to admit it there are negatives. Many time the postives home HSing outweigh the negatives but it doesn't mean the negatives don't exist. Some of these things on this thread are of a personal nature (some parents just can't be "on" 24/7) but some of the things mentioned really do pertain to all homeschooling families.  It's important to recognize them so you can accurately weigh your options. If you can't even admit there are any negatives to homeschool then I don't think you have an accurate picture of school.  I know I'm not bashing HS and if someone would have asked for the negitives of PS I would chime in there too. It's just a matter of finding the balance that works for your kids and your family. Not that one method is perfect and the other seriously flawed. 

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#64 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 05:24 AM
 
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When we HS we spent a lot more than 1 hour on HS. Not that my kids were chained to the table! I tried really hard (and succeeded according to my kids lol) to make their school fun. But it still took time. We read stories, played learning games, did our actually lessons, science experiments, lesson planing, library trips to gather up books we need, art/craft time, videos and trips to reinforce lessons, we had several weekly homeschool groups, field trips......really it can be tiring lol.  I do not for a minute believe a child can be well educated (barring super gifted kids) in one hour a day on a regular basis. My kids are required to read for at least 30 minutes a day and this is while they are in school all day!  We only HS for first grade and if we were super fast and only did math, reading, and writing we could maybe get done in one hour. That was rushing though and she would still have needed to do silent reading on top of that. Again it's not that they were chained to a desk doing work the whole time, I  chose a very hands on math program, it was fun, all our history/science was very hands on and fun, but it still took time to do. Writing I believe I did not spend enough time on. My DD was a bit behind in that when she started back to school. HS just does not require the amount of writing PS does.  Reading you need time for instruction than at LEAST 30 min. a day for silent reading.....  Driving to different activities, cleaning up! lol It all took time in my house anyway.Not that we didn't enjoy it, but to tell people HS takes one hour is just not an accurate discription of HS. lol  

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#65 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 09:34 AM
 
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I really do believe that it depends on the kid, the parent and family circumstance if hs or not will work. For us, I have 4 kids-3 when I hs'ed, 1 was born after they went on to ps.

 

DD1- Special needs, I spent countless hours and a mass amount of money trying to make it work..it was a disaster. Not her fault or mine, shes better off in B&M school

 

DS1-typical kid. Easy to teach at home, independent learner loves to read. Entered ps 2 yrs above grade level, except in handwriting which he still hates to write. He would thrive no matter what educational setting hes in. He loved hs, but prefers ps for the friends & extras we cannot provide

 

DS2- hs'ed for pre-k, entering K in the fall at ps..emerging reader, basic math is better-completely on grade level per his assesment tests in April-is not interested in staying home with mom anymore

 

Financially it was an extreme challenge as my dh & I run a home biz-he is also a chef at a local eatery but with 4 kids and a low amount of stable income, extra lessons & activities were a low priority when we hs'ed them all . We needed to make sure food was on the table, bills were paid, kids cirricula was paid for before music, dance etc etc. Now with ps, we have the ability to divert some of the money to extra stuff they want to take part in.

 

Time commitment- I was on 24/7 as mom/teacher and financial provider, my house was routinely neglected, I had no identity other than mom and rarely got 5 min to myself..even getting a bath to myself was like pulling teeth.

 

Like many have said it has its ups & downs, its not always a wonderful experience and its not always bad but I would tell anyone considering their options to look carefully at their own circumstances, and evaluate them individualy before making a decision.

 

ETA: We also live in Ohio, where if the superintendent of the district does not agree with your kids test scores/cirriculum/progression they can step in..I have NEVER seen this happen in all the hs communities I have been involved in as most of the districts try to work with the hs'ers in the area but it is within their power and like anything involving the gvt should not be taken lightly.


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#66 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 11:11 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AllyRae View Post
 And no way did he waste hours a day at school either.  He was working equally as long there.


I'll probably respond to the rest of this later, as I'm enjoying the conversation (even though we're veering a little OT), but wanted to respond to this, especially. DS1 worked long hours in school. In both fourth and fifth grades, he was working at school all day, then doing a bunch of homework. He was putting in so much homework time that it cut heavily into our lives. We lost our evening walks. Except for Cub Scouts, we gave up on any other evening activities, including things as simple as going for a swim together. The "work" he was doing at and for school ate our lives. He learned almost nothing. When his fifth grade teacher went on maternity leave, I found out that the entire class, not just ds1, was way behind on math (this includes both the kids who had tested out as gifted two years previously). His English skills hadn't improved even a little bit. He had a pretty good couple of years, socially, and got straight As - and learned pretty much zip. He worked long hours - but the time was completely wasted. Homeschooling wasn't even on my radar back then (and there's no way we could have done it any earlier than about 3rd grade...maybe halfway through 2nd), but I'd have yanked him out in a heartbeat, if I'd realized it was a viable option.


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#67 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 11:54 AM
 
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I think the bottom line is that it's incumbent upon the parents to assess their child's progress each year (or maybe more often). And by assessing, it means looking at the whole picture: Is the child learning what they should (including art, music, physical development) for their age? Is the child thriving socially? Emotionally? Assessing isn't testing, by the way, it's gauging progress and the child's strengths and weaknesses. I've got a child, for example, who has considerable academic ability and is far ahead in academic subjects, but she's got some social learning and considerable emotional leearning to do. We know that, and so we're working on that at home and in school.

 

This assessment needs to be done whether the child is in school or homeschooled. It needs to be done whether the child is in private school or public school or homeschooled. I know of specific instances in each kind of situation where the schooling format was not working for the child. When that happens, something needs to change. It's very easy to be lulled into thinking that the situation is 'normal', when it's not (or shouldn't be).

 

If you choose to homeschool, then I think it's also incumbent upon you to make sure you do your homework. You need to figure out what way your child learns best (of the major mistakes that novice teachers make is teaching how they learn best). You need to learn how to assess your child's progress and development.

 


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#68 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 12:34 PM
 
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I think the point is there are negative aspects to homeschooling for everyone though. As much as some people don't like to admit it there are negatives. Many time the postives home HSing outweigh the negatives but it doesn't mean the negatives don't exist. Some of these things on this thread are of a personal nature (some parents just can't be "on" 24/7) but some of the things mentioned really do pertain to all homeschooling families.  It's important to recognize them so you can accurately weigh your options. If you can't even admit there are any negatives to homeschool then I don't think you have an accurate picture of school.  I know I'm not bashing HS and if someone would have asked for the negitives of PS I would chime in there too. It's just a matter of finding the balance that works for your kids and your family. Not that one method is perfect and the other seriously flawed. 



I think that the "negatives" around homeschooling are often the same as the negatives around parenting and would for the most part be experienced regardless of the choice of schooling because so much of it is a function of the parent-child dynamic, personalities and relationship. Homeschooling may amplify them - or not.  Kids - regardless of education choice - require money, time, attention, chauffering. Parents will spend time reserving library books, organizing programs, volunteering, coaching, assisting with academics etc .  There will be money spent on lessons, curriculum/school supplies, books, sports, etc. There will be parenting struggles, academic struggles, missed cues, social issues to navigate, things to worry about regardless of educational choice etc. Parents get burned out - that's not homeschool dependent - I have plenty of schooling parent friends who are burnt out.

All of this is the nature of parenting for some parents and some kids.

To lay these out as negatives of homeschooling is IMO misleading because it assumes that none of this would happen without homeschooling and that's just not the case. Our experience of parenting our kids has a lot in common regardless of our educational choices, and our differences often have more to do with our own personal perspectives and thresholds, rather than our educational choices.

I'm not saying that there aren't challenges for homeschooling parents or that for some people, some of these challenges may be mitigated by using public school. (For other families their challenges would be amplified by sending kids to public school).  I think it is admirable to look to the experience of others to help us weigh our own options,  but I'd like to suggest to the OP that much of what is laid out here as negatives of homeschooling may have more connection to the experience of parenting in general than to educational choice. 

 

While I personally don't consider them negatives (or wholly negative) the differences for my family btn our homeschooling and public schooling come down to a few key ones:

~ responsibility - I feel far more responsible for my children's education as a homeschooler than I did as a public school parent. For the most part this is a positive but there are times that it can weigh on me.

~ cost - I think this one is a wash for us as far as lessons, curriculum etc go but homeschooling does mean that I forego the income I probably could have been earning if I could work full time in the workforce in my former field. The flip side of this is that homeschooling has lead to a couple of part time business opportunities, and has in many ways decreased our cost of living.

~ time/work-life balance - I like spending time with my kids and have found ways to pursue my own interests and passions while homeschooling. For me personally homeschooling has lead to personal growth and a wider world. It hasn't meant losing myself. But I can see how that could happen for others and it is something I am mindful of for myself.

 

As far as my kids go I think that for them homeschooling has been overwhelmingly positive. We'll see what they say when they are adults. :)

 

 

 


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#69 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 02:09 PM
 
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I think the bottom line is that it's incumbent upon the parents to assess their child's progress each year (or maybe more often).


banghead.gif   The rhetoric in the homeschooling community is to ignore problems. To give it time, to not push academics, to let kids develop at their own rate. There are kids who are YEARS behind academically or socially whose mothers are routinely told to relax. And homeschooling truly can mask special needs. You don't see how your child is doing compared to their peers all the time.

You don't really know how much writing most kids their age are required to do, or how their punctuation and grammar really compare.

 

I think the homeschooling community does its self a disservice when it refuses to admit there are downsides.

 

Everyone knows there are downsides to school -- that's in the media all the time, people love to complain about education, especial in America. No one is saying there aren't downsides to school. There are a bunch of threads on this board about it. winky.gif

 

 


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#70 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 03:20 PM
 
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banghead.gif   The rhetoric in the homeschooling community is to ignore problems. To give it time, to not push academics, to let kids develop at their own rate. There are kids who are YEARS behind academically or socially whose mothers are routinely told to relax. And homeschooling truly can mask special needs. You don't see how your child is doing compared to their peers all the time.

You don't really know how much writing most kids their age are required to do, or how their punctuation and grammar really compare.

 

I think the homeschooling community does its self a disservice when it refuses to admit there are downsides.

 

Everyone knows there are downsides to school -- that's in the media all the time, people love to complain about education, especial in America. No one is saying there aren't downsides to school. There are a bunch of threads on this board about it. winky.gif

 

 

but that is exactly a downside of school. kids are supposed to be at a certain "level" and if they are not there, there is something off with them. I believe that kids learn differently, that is important that they are able to go at their own pace and are not constantly compared to their peers.
 

 

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#71 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 03:29 PM
 
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banghead.gif   The rhetoric in the homeschooling community is to ignore problems. To give it time, to not push academics, to let kids develop at their own rate. There are kids who are YEARS behind academically or socially whose mothers are routinely told to relax. And homeschooling truly can mask special needs. You don't see how your child is doing compared to their peers all the time.

You don't really know how much writing most kids their age are required to do, or how their punctuation and grammar really compare.

 

I think the homeschooling community does its self a disservice when it refuses to admit there are downsides.

 

 

Well, I think this depends on the "type" of homeschooling one does.   Most homeschoolers I know do use a curriculum, which actually makes it pretty easy to recognize if your child is behind.  I mean, if you are using say a 4th grade english book for a 4th grader, then you generally have a good idea of what is expected of a 4th grader when it comes to punctuation and grammar and how your child compares.  Same for math or reading or whatever.  If you are using a 4th grade math book, then you know that if your child can master the skills that book teaches then they are on target grade-wise with their peers.

 

And, honestly I've only seen that rhetoric about "wait and see" in really "online" homeschool communities.  Most homeschoolers I know IRL have been very concerned if their child wasn't reading by X age, or having trouble with a concept, and they would take steps to correct it.


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#72 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 03:39 PM
 
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I think that the "negatives" around homeschooling are often the same as the negatives around parenting and would for the most part be experienced regardless of the choice of schooling because so much of it is a function of the parent-child dynamic, personalities and relationship. Homeschooling may amplify them - or not.  Kids - regardless of education choice - require money, time, attention, chauffering. Parents will spend time reserving library books, organizing programs, volunteering, coaching, assisting with academics etc .  There will be money spent on lessons, curriculum/school supplies, books, sports, etc. There will be parenting struggles, academic struggles, missed cues, social issues to navigate, things to worry about regardless of educational choice etc. Parents get burned out - that's not homeschool dependent - I have plenty of schooling parent friends who are burnt out.

All of this is the nature of parenting for some parents and some kids.

To lay these out as negatives of homeschooling is IMO misleading because it assumes that none of this would happen without homeschooling and that's just not the case. Our experience of parenting our kids has a lot in common regardless of our educational choices, and our differences often have more to do with our own personal perspectives and thresholds, rather than our educational choices.

I'm not saying that there aren't challenges for homeschooling parents or that for some people, some of these challenges may be mitigated by using public school. (For other families their challenges would be amplified by sending kids to public school).  I think it is admirable to look to the experience of others to help us weigh our own options,  but I'd like to suggest to the OP that much of what is laid out here as negatives of homeschooling may have more connection to the experience of parenting in general than to educational choice. 

 

While I personally don't consider them negatives (or wholly negative) the differences for my family btn our homeschooling and public schooling come down to a few key ones:

~ responsibility - I feel far more responsible for my children's education as a homeschooler than I did as a public school parent. For the most part this is a positive but there are times that it can weigh on me.

~ cost - I think this one is a wash for us as far as lessons, curriculum etc go but homeschooling does mean that I forego the income I probably could have been earning if I could work full time in the workforce in my former field. The flip side of this is that homeschooling has lead to a couple of part time business opportunities, and has in many ways decreased our cost of living.

~ time/work-life balance - I like spending time with my kids and have found ways to pursue my own interests and passions while homeschooling. For me personally homeschooling has lead to personal growth and a wider world. It hasn't meant losing myself. But I can see how that could happen for others and it is something I am mindful of for myself.

 

As far as my kids go I think that for them homeschooling has been overwhelmingly positive. We'll see what they say when they are adults. :)

 

 

 


Mnnn. I'm not sure I agree wholeheartedly. As my son's mother of course I and his father are the bottom-line when it comes to responsibility for his education. But that is really different from taking on the daily hands-on responsibility for designing curriculum, setting standards and evaluating progress. As an example my son struggled with writing this year. We talked to his teacher about what to do about it and she said "nothing; let us push him a bit in school and you just give him playtime at home, so he comes in rested and secure." That approach worked (if it hadn't, we'd've strategized again).

 


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#73 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 03:56 PM
 
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Well, I think this depends on the "type" of homeschooling one does.   Most homeschoolers I know do use a curriculum, which actually makes it pretty easy to recognize if your child is behind.  I mean, if you are using say a 4th grade english book for a 4th grader, then you generally have a good idea of what is expected of a 4th grader when it comes to punctuation and grammar and how your child compares.  Same for math or reading or whatever.  If you are using a 4th grade math book, then you know that if your child can master the skills that book teaches then they are on target grade-wise with their peers.

 

And, honestly I've only seen that rhetoric about "wait and see" in really "online" homeschool communities.  Most homeschoolers I know IRL have been very concerned if their child wasn't reading by X age, or having trouble with a concept, and they would take steps to correct it.



 

While I would generally agree, I can tell you that the last year we hs'ed a 1/2 yr through an eschool because I was lost as to what to do, and even the teachers told me that there needed to be more "evidence" that there was a problem with my dd before there were any steps to intervene. Frustrated, burned out & pregnant I enrolled them in ps..on day 2 of ps the teacher called me about the things they noticed, and we all agreed to an evaluation immediately. So again I think it depends on the people involved

 

 

 

 


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#74 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 04:43 PM
 
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I think that the "negatives" around homeschooling are often the same as the negatives around parenting and would for the most part be experienced regardless of the choice of schooling because so much of it is a function of the parent-child dynamic, personalities and relationship. Homeschooling may amplify them - or not.  Kids - regardless of education choice - require money, time, attention, chauffering. Parents will spend time reserving library books, organizing programs, volunteering, coaching, assisting with academics etc .  There will be money spent on lessons, curriculum/school supplies, books, sports, etc. There will be parenting struggles, academic struggles, missed cues, social issues to navigate, things to worry about regardless of educational choice etc. Parents get burned out - that's not homeschool dependent - I have plenty of schooling parent friends who are burnt out.

All of this is the nature of parenting for some parents and some kids.

To lay these out as negatives of homeschooling is IMO misleading because it assumes that none of this would happen without homeschooling and that's just not the case. Our experience of parenting our kids has a lot in common regardless of our educational choices, and our differences often have more to do with our own personal perspectives and thresholds, rather than our educational choices.

I'm not saying that there aren't challenges for homeschooling parents or that for some people, some of these challenges may be mitigated by using public school. (For other families their challenges would be amplified by sending kids to public school).  I think it is admirable to look to the experience of others to help us weigh our own options,  but I'd like to suggest to the OP that much of what is laid out here as negatives of homeschooling may have more connection to the experience of parenting in general than to educational choice. 

 

While I personally don't consider them negatives (or wholly negative) the differences for my family btn our homeschooling and public schooling come down to a few key ones:

~ responsibility - I feel far more responsible for my children's education as a homeschooler than I did as a public school parent. For the most part this is a positive but there are times that it can weigh on me.

~ cost - I think this one is a wash for us as far as lessons, curriculum etc go but homeschooling does mean that I forego the income I probably could have been earning if I could work full time in the workforce in my former field. The flip side of this is that homeschooling has lead to a couple of part time business opportunities, and has in many ways decreased our cost of living.

~ time/work-life balance - I like spending time with my kids and have found ways to pursue my own interests and passions while homeschooling. For me personally homeschooling has lead to personal growth and a wider world. It hasn't meant losing myself. But I can see how that could happen for others and it is something I am mindful of for myself.

 

As far as my kids go I think that for them homeschooling has been overwhelmingly positive. We'll see what they say when they are adults. :)

 

 

 

 

ehhh I disagree. Parenting and homeschooling are different. yes I'm still responsible for my kids education (i.e. making sure they are getting taught in school, doing extras at home, reading, etc.) It's not at all the same as when we were homeschooling. I'm more of a supervisor. If I see my kids are struggling/not bringing challenged my job is to bring it to the teacher/school. I think it's almost a slap in the face to all the hard work homeschoolers do to say it's the same thing as having them in school. Being 100% responsible for your kids education is different.  I'm on my way ou,t but I will come back to this one later. :)  

 

Again I'm not saying people can't have positive experiences homeschooling. I've seen it IRL and over all my experience was positive even though we stopped homeschooling.  :) 

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I wanted to touch on the time spent doing school thing.  I think this can be very individual.  For "*at home, academic subjects**, my just started 1st grader (6 yo) spends about 1-2 hours a day on school.  When she did K, it was closer to 1 hour.  In K, she basically only did reading, math, handwriting (and we also do religion).  In first grade, we added a spelling/phonics program, simple science and simple health to that.      My just started 4th grader (9 yo). does between 3.5-5 hours of schoolwork a day.  This includes spelling, language arts, english/grammer, history, science, handwriting, math, and religion.   We do school 3 days a week, all year long.    I spend maybe 15 minutes a day on planning.  Overall, I would say that I spend about 15 hours a week on homeschool  (this doesn't count things like playdates, park days, field trips, outside classes, clubs, extracurriculers or our weekly coop).  I basically consider homeschooling (the at-home academic part) to be a part-time job.

 

 

I also wanted to touch on another point that was made upthread (sorry, I can't go back and find a quote), but it was something like public schooled kids are better at finding a kindred spirit in a crowd of people they have nothing in common with.   I went to public school for my entire educations, and frankly both then and now I was really bad at finding a kindred spirit among people I have nothing in common with.   I only have 2 "good" friends in high school, and we hardly ever saw each other outside of school.   As an adult, I have a difficult time being friends with people I have NOTHING in common with.     I did not do well socially in school at all.  In fact, I think going to school really hindered my social life and social growth.  I was a shy child, so doing something like setting up a playdate with my friends, or arranging to meet friends outside school was EXTREMELY difficult for me.  I would get super nervous just at the thought of calling my friends on the phone.  Making arrangements to see friends outside of school was way, way outside my comfort zone, so I didn't do it.  I WANTED to be social, I just didn't have the tools to do so and my parents never set up playdates for me, so I never learned them.   I know for my kids, being homeschooled has been better for them socially than school was for me as they have so many more 1 on 1 playdates than I EVER had my entire childhood.   They have more opportunities to make friends than I ever had.  And, since I know their friend's parents, it is so much easier for me to set up playdates for them or to feel comfortable calling a friend up and saying "hey, we'll be at x park tomorrow at 10, want to join us".   If my child came home from school, and said "hey, I'm really good friends with Jane, can we have a playdate", I would have much more difficulty calling up Jane's parents and arranging that, if I don't know her parents.   While with other homeschoolers, I'm at least on a friendly basis with most of them so would be happier to set up a playdate.


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ehhh I disagree. Parenting and homeschooling are different. yes I'm still responsible for my kids education (i.e. making sure they are getting taught in school, doing extras at home, reading, etc.) It's not at all the same as when we were homeschooling. I'm more of a supervisor. If I see my kids are struggling/not bringing challenged my job is to bring it to the teacher/school. I think it's almost a slap in the face to all the hard work homeschoolers do to say it's the same thing as having them in school. Being 100% responsible for your kids education is different.  I'm on my way ou,t but I will come back to this one later. :)  

 

Again I'm not saying people can't have positive experiences homeschooling. I've seen it IRL and over all my experience was positive even though we stopped homeschooling.  :) 



I'm not sure where you got that I think that homeschooling is the same thing as being in school. What I said is that IME and based on reading this posts in this thread thread, most of what is being stated as a downside of homeschooling is a function of parenting, not homeschooling and that similar struggles (ie the negatives of homeschooling)  would be found whether kids are in school or homeschooling because homeschooling is an extention of the parenting relationship. School however brings with it a different set of challenges because it encompasses a whole other realm of relationships and requirements.  I'm not saying that homeschooling isn't hard work - not by a longshot. It takes a lot of energy to faciliate a child's education and for me personally I feel far more responsible for my kids' education than I did when they were in school.   I'm just saying that (for example) burnout, or worrying about whether your kids are on track academically aren't unique to homeschooling. That they are just part of parenting.  To hold them up as huge negatives of homeschooling is misleading.

 

 


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Quote:
 based on reading this posts in this thread thread, most of what is being stated as a downside of homeschooling is a function of parenting, not homeschooling and that similar struggles (ie the negatives of homeschooling)  would be found whether kids are in school or homeschooling because homeschooling is an extention of the parenting relationship. 

bold by me-

 

I see this as well

 

 

I also see for every negative HS comment and equal school comment (argument) could be made-just the same

 

I'm really wondering what more the OP wants to hear-and the reasoning and or need?


 

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banghead.gif   The rhetoric in the homeschooling community is to ignore problems. To give it time, to not push academics, to let kids develop at their own rate. There are kids who are YEARS behind academically or socially whose mothers are routinely told to relax. And homeschooling truly can mask special needs. You don't see how your child is doing compared to their peers all the time.

You don't really know how much writing most kids their age are required to do, or how their punctuation and grammar really compare.

 

I think the homeschooling community does its self a disservice when it refuses to admit there are downsides.

 

Everyone knows there are downsides to school -- that's in the media all the time, people love to complain about education, especial in America. No one is saying there aren't downsides to school. There are a bunch of threads on this board about it. winky.gif

 

 



I disagree completely. I've never met a homeschooling parent who doesn't understand where their kids are with respect to general academic progress. That info about school expectations is extremely easy to find online, or to come across if you have any friends or relatives who attend school.

I have 2 possibly 3 kids who may be identified as special needs kids in the school system. Homeschooling doesn't mask those differences - it just changes how we approach education and the development of those skills for which they need more support.  The fact that they aren't in school actually serves them well because they can learn in their own ways, at their own pace without running into the notion that they are years behind what the school model says they should be.  My one child has worked with a reading specialist for the past 2 years who helps plenty of children who are there not because the school caught the problems, but because the parents did and realized that what the school could/would do was limited.

 

And I have to say I disagree with the premise that the school system operates on a schedule which reflects developmental appropriateness for academics or social skills. In my province beginning in September there will be full day/every day Kindegarden complete with educational expectations for language and math for THREE year olds. There are reams of research that show the benefits of delayed academics for young children, the benefits of play based education, and the need for small groups or one on one attachments for the under 5 set. What is defined by the school system as academically or socially typical is not by definition developmentally appropriate. Most teachers I know admit that the academic expectations, particularly for boys in the early years are not developmentally appropriate and that the expectations for high school are often too low.   

 

I'm sorry you feel like the homeschooling community failed your children by not helping you identify that they needed something different. But I wonder if your expectations for what the homeschooling community (online or IRL) should have or could have done to prevent your experience are realistic.


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#79 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 09:09 PM
 
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What annoys me about this thread is that, even though some of my experiences are unique because one of my kids has some special needs, some of my experiences are really common to homeschoolers. I know because I spent years talking to them back when I was one! winky.gif At park days, field trips, homeschool girl scout troops, etc. -- many homeschool moms are tired; feel like they aren't doing enough; worry about the subjects their kids are struggling with; haven't a clue how their child writing compares to peers; would really like to find time to exercise; struggle to keep the house clean, the laundry done and dinner on the table, etc.

 

Homeschool moms at a park day can talk about the downsides of homeschooling, but it's like they have to put on this big mask when "outsiders" are around.

 

It's all a mixed bag, school or homeschool. Why is that so hard to admit?


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What annoys me about this thread is that, even though some of my experiences are unique because one of my kids has some special needs, some of my experiences are really common to homeschoolers. I know because I spent years talking to them back when I was one! winky.gif At park days, field trips, homeschool girl scout troops, etc. -- many homeschool moms are tired; feel like they aren't doing enough; worry about the subjects their kids are struggling with; haven't a clue how their child writing compares to peers; would really like to find time to exercise; struggle to keep the house clean, the laundry done and dinner on the table, etc.

 

Homeschool moms at a park day can talk about the downsides of homeschooling, but it's like they have to put on this big mask when "outsiders" are around.

 

It's all a mixed bag, school or homeschool. Why is that so hard to admit?


yeahthat.gif

 

to karenwith4: the negatives I listed where not parenting problems.Not being able to spend enough time with my littlest child was a direct result of homeschooing.   Not knowing how to grade my oldest writing was a real negative (IMO) to homeschooling and a very common problem according to the people I talked to. This is not at all a parenting problem. Not having as large of a peer group to choose friends from was a negative (again this is all my opinion) it had nothing to do with my parenting. The stress of being 100% responsible for their education is not something that is an extention of parenting. It is something unique to homeschooling. Even my child that works best for the teacher wasn't a parenting problem. She is my easiest kid by far. lol   There really are pros and cons to everything in life. I don't know why it would be so hard to understand that? And nobody on this thread said school was always right about everything. I disagree with quite a few things about schools.....Enough to have homeschooled and to be open to doing it again.  lol  The OP asked for negatives of homeschooling so those who have done both gave them to her. Maybe homeschooling for you is all peaches and roses, but it is not like that for many people. Many homeschoolers struggle with doing it all, and the negative aspects of homeschooling. If we do go back to homeschooling it will be because the positives of it are out weighing the negatives. Not because homeschooling is a perfect form of education without any negatives.  

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Quote:


 

 


 

 



Quote:
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What annoys me about this thread is that, even though some of my experiences are unique because one of my kids has some special needs, some of my experiences are really common to homeschoolers. I know because I spent years talking to them back when I was one! winky.gif At park days, field trips, homeschool girl scout troops, etc. -- many homeschool moms are tired; feel like they aren't doing enough; worry about the subjects their kids are struggling with; haven't a clue how their child writing compares to peers; would really like to find time to exercise; struggle to keep the house clean, the laundry done and dinner on the table, etc.

 

Homeschool moms at a park day can talk about the downsides of homeschooling, but it's like they have to put on this big mask when "outsiders" are around.

 

It's all a mixed bag, school or homeschool. Why is that so hard to admit?


LOL - did you actually read my posts?

Yes - homeschooling parents want to find a life/home balance, are tired, are careful about who they vent t o, sometimes worry about their kids' social interactions and academic progress - JUST LIKE PS parents do.   It's all a mixed bag. It's called parenting. The challenges aren't uniquely negative aspects of homeschooling. Take homeschooling out of the equation and the same amount of time, energy, money and concern will still be expended on the child. That is my point.


 

 


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#82 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 10:52 PM
 
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It's all a mixed bag, school or homeschool. Why is that so hard to admit?



I will admit it's a mixed bag.

 

But, I also know that if I expressed any reservations about having ds1 in public school, people jumped all over me with all the reasons why it was best, even though there were clear problems with both the education he was receiving and the social environment. If I say one word to anyone about any issues I'm having with dd1 or ds2, I am immediately told that these problems would basically vanish if I put him in public school. DS2 hasn't yet been formally assessed, but I'm quite sure he has special needs of some kind - the schools may or may not be able to help him, but those needs aren't going to go away in public school. (I know another boy with very similar issues to ds2, who is a couple of years older, and in public school, and things are going steadily downhill.) If I sometimes paint an overly rosy picture, it's probably because I don't want lecture 355 about how dd1 wouldn't be socially anxious if she were in public school (yes, she would - she's a lot like I was in that respect, and public school was a nightmare!), and ds2's behavioural issues would just go away (they didn't in preschool) and all the rest of that crap. Yes - sometimes, I wish I could carve out more "me time". Sometimes, I wish I could get more sleep, although that has more to do with dd2 than the others! But, I don't want to hear about how great the public schools are and how they can solve all my problems. People seem to overlook that I've been there and doing that the entire time I've also been homeschooling.


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#83 of 221 Old 07-02-2011, 11:09 PM
 
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yeahthat.gif

 

to karenwith4: the negatives I listed where not parenting problems.Not being able to spend enough time with my littlest child was a direct result of homeschooing.   Not knowing how to grade my oldest writing was a real negative (IMO) to homeschooling and a very common problem according to the people I talked to. This is not at all a parenting problem. Not having as large of a peer group to choose friends from was a negative (again this is all my opinion) it had nothing to do with my parenting. The stress of being 100% responsible for their education is not something that is an extention of parenting. It is something unique to homeschooling. Even my child that works best for the teacher wasn't a parenting problem. She is my easiest kid by far. lol   There really are pros and cons to everything in life. I don't know why it would be so hard to understand that? And nobody on this thread said school was always right about everything. I disagree with quite a few things about schools.....Enough to have homeschooled and to be open to doing it again.  lol  The OP asked for negatives of homeschooling so those who have done both gave them to her. Maybe homeschooling for you is all peaches and roses, but it is not like that for many people. Many homeschoolers struggle with doing it all, and the negative aspects of homeschooling. If we do go back to homeschooling it will be because the positives of it are out weighing the negatives. Not because homeschooling is a perfect form of education without any negatives.  



That's cool - we can agree to disagree although I am not sure we do disagree much. I'm not saying your concerns aren't valid. And just to clarify I didn't say that your concerns about homeschooling are caused by a parenting problem.  I just don't think worrying about a homeschooled child's social circle is dramatically different than worrying about a public schooled child's social interactions. It's part and parcel of parenting. I have the same big picture concerns as my girlfriends who send their kids to PS. Parenting isn't all peaches and roses regardless of how you educate your child.

Maybe my friends are unique, but my girlfriends who PS their kids spend time finding library books, hauling their kids to programs, organize activities and go on field trips,  struggle over what's appropriate for their kids education and wonder if they are keeping up, worry about social stuff and spending enough time with all their kids individually, don't have enough time/energy to do all the laundry/cook dinner/get to the gym/have date  nights with their husbands. None of that is unique to homeschoolers.  If as a PS parent you don't admit to any of that, then you are doing exactly what you and Linda are accusing homeschoolers of doing - not being honest.  These things aren't negatives, and they aren't about homeschooling. It's just the way parenting (not schooling) works.

 

 


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#84 of 221 Old 07-03-2011, 07:47 AM
 
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But, I also know that if I expressed any reservations about having ds1 in public school, people jumped all over me with all the reasons why it was best, even though there were clear problems with both the education he was receiving and the social environment. If I say one word to anyone about any issues I'm having with dd1 or ds2, I am immediately told that these problems would basically vanish if I put him in public school.

 Yes, I think this is an important point.  If  school isn't going well, it's not as though everyone starts suggesting that a child be homeschooled.   Everyone offers suggestions about working within the school system to better the experience.    Yet, when homeschooling isn't working, everyone seems to just immediately jump to the conclusion to put the child in school.   And, that may be the best option in some cases, just like it may be the best option for some schooled kids to be homeschooled.  But it isn't always, and oftentimes problems at home are still problems in school...the only difference is that now it is also the teacher's/school's problem. .

 

School is automatically seen as the "default" and homeschooling is only acceptable if it is going "well".  Which is why homeschoolers are hesitant to talk about the difficulties with non-homeschoolers.

 

Until homeschooling is seen on equal ground with non-homeschooling, homeschoolers with continue to only share their problems with people on the "inside"  because sometimes when things aren't going well, they want to solve the problem within the context of homeschooling and not be immediately told that they should put their kid in school.  For some homeschoolers that may not be an option, just like for many non-homeschoolers, homeschooling is not an option.  Each family makes their own choice based on many factors.

 

Quote:
Yes - homeschooling parents want to find a life/home balance, are tired, are careful about who they vent t o, sometimes worry about their kids' social interactions and academic progress - JUST LIKE PS parents do.   It's all a mixed bag. It's called parenting. The challenges aren't uniquely negative aspects of homeschooling. Take homeschooling out of the equation and the same amount of time, energy, money and concern will still be expended on the child. That is my point.

Yes, I definitely agree. Parenting is hard no matter how you do it.  Homeschooling and non-homeschooling both have issues and problems.  Which is why each family needs to examine their values and decide what is right for them.  FWIW...I was more tired and had less time to exercise, etc.  when my kids were younger (before homeschooling) than I am now (with older kids and homeschooling).


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#85 of 221 Old 07-03-2011, 08:02 AM
 
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Also, to the OP, I'm not sure what you wanted from this thread, but I wanted to say that I don't think you can't really decide to homeschool or not based on a list of pros and cons.  Homeschooling looks differently for each family, and each family does it a bit differently.  All you can do is examine your values and what is important to you and look for where your heart and gut is leading you.  If that is leading you to homeschool, then give it a try.  You can always change.  Just like if that is leading you to a B&M school, then give it a try and you can always try homeschooling later.   People always say "follow your gut" and I think in choosing an education choice, this is good advice.    Nothing is set in stone, and you can always change later.

 

 


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#86 of 221 Old 07-03-2011, 12:49 PM
 
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Stormbride,

 

I totally agree that people are quick to blame homeschooling for children's basic personalities. One of my kids is outgoing and bubbly, and when we were homeschooling, I was told repeatedly that the problem was that she wasn't around other kids enough, she wasn't getting enough socialization. My other child is extremely quiet, shy, and easily overwhelmed. I was repeatedly told that the problem was that she wasn't around other kids enough, she wasn't getting enough socialization. It drove me BATTY!

 

Kids are who they are. With my children having the same genes and being raised with the same basic parenting and yet being so opposite, I'm constantly amazed at people believing that our parenting choices determine what our kids are like. And homeschooling is just one of many choices that a parent makes.
 

 

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Maybe my friends are unique, but my girlfriends who PS their kids spend time finding library books, hauling their kids to programs, organize activities and go on field trips,  struggle over what's appropriate for their kids education and wonder if they are keeping up, worry about social stuff and spending enough time with all their kids individually, don't have enough time/energy to do all the laundry/cook dinner/get to the gym/have date  nights with their husbands. None of that is unique to homeschoolers.  If as a PS parent you don't admit to any of that, then you are doing exactly what you and Linda are accusing homeschoolers of doing - not being honest.  These things aren't negatives, and they aren't about homeschooling. It's just the way parenting (not schooling) works.

 

 


My kids spend 6.5 hours a day, 180 days of the year in a place where other highly qualified and caring adults do things like teach math lessons, led science experiments, facilitate discussions about literature, etc. Yes, I drive my kids to the library, but if you are not putting in more hours than I do on your kids education, then IMHO, your kids are getting short changed.  You really ought to be doing more than me to make up for what your kids aren't getting by going to a wonderful school like the one my kids go to. Why not own up to that?

 

Having done both, it's FAR easier to do all the other stuff (like shopping and taking care of myself) when I have regular breaks from my kids, other people teach them lots of stuff, and they have social options built right into their day. I have less total to do, and more time in which to do it.

 

Having kids in a school *that works for them* is easier and less time consuming that homeschooling.

 

The deal is that not every child has a school available that works for them, and some moms love homeschooling so much that they prefer it even if there is a wonderful school available for their child. That's all OK. I'm not saying school is the best option for every child or every mother. I'm saying that homeschooling takes time and effort to do it well.

 

As far as "struggling over my kids education,"  I have the privilege of having regular conferences with teachers who work my kids all the time and have worked with lots of other kids. I love parent teacher conferences so much. I love being part of a TEAM working on my kids education rather than going it alone.

 

 


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YES YES YES!!!!  I agree with all of this!  As a homeschooler AND as a parent who used to have a child in school.  Seriously, I really can't believe people think they can put very very little time and effort into homeschooling and think that's ok.  If you think that's all they're getting at public schools, you really have a warped view of what school is.  And at public school, that responsibility is split between various teachers.  With homeschooling, the primary burden of coordinating and providing academic and art instruction, socialization, and enrichment is up to the parent.  That is a huge job.  And part of the reason I have to deal with inlaws that think homeschooling is a joke and is going to ruin our son is because as public school teachers, they were faced with tons of children re-entering the school system after sub-par homeschooling where they were literally given an hour or two a day of instruction and then were left to their own devices (or video games.)  When in reality, we have a very wonderful homeschooling community in our area, and judging from talking to other parents, at least 5 hours a day of teaching is the norm, on top of the tremendous amount of effort it takes to make sure you provide opportunities for a well-rounded enriching stimulating development.
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

Stormbride,

 

I totally agree that people are quick to blame homeschooling for children's basic personalities. One of my kids is outgoing and bubbly, and when we were homeschooling, I was told repeatedly that the problem was that she wasn't around other kids enough, she wasn't getting enough socialization. My other child is extremely quiet, shy, and easily overwhelmed. I was repeatedly told that the problem was that she wasn't around other kids enough, she wasn't getting enough socialization. It drove me BATTY!

 

Kids are who they are. With my children having the same genes and being raised with the same basic parenting and yet being so opposite, I'm constantly amazed at people believing that our parenting choices determine what our kids are like. And homeschooling is just one of many choices that a parent makes.
 

 


My kids spend 6.5 hours a day, 180 days of the year in a place where other highly qualified and caring adults do things like teach math lessons, led science experiments, facilitate discussions about literature, etc. Yes, I drive my kids to the library, but if you are not putting in more hours than I do on your kids education, then IMHO, your kids are getting short changed.  You really ought to be doing more than me to make up for what your kids aren't getting by going to a wonderful school like the one my kids go to. Why not own up to that?

 

Having done both, it's FAR easier to do all the other stuff (like shopping and taking care of myself) when I have regular breaks from my kids, other people teach them lots of stuff, and they have social options built right into their day. I have less total to do, and more time in which to do it.

 

Having kids in a school *that works for them* is easier and less time consuming that homeschooling.

 

The deal is that not every child has a school available that works for them, and some moms love homeschooling so much that they prefer it even if there is a wonderful school available for their child. That's all OK. I'm not saying school is the best option for every child or every mother. I'm saying that homeschooling takes time and effort to do it well.

 

As far as "struggling over my kids education,"  I have the privilege of having regular conferences with teachers who work my kids all the time and have worked with lots of other kids. I love parent teacher conferences so much. I love being part of a TEAM working on my kids education rather than going it alone.

 

 



 


~Brandon Michael (11/23/03), Jocelyn Lily Nữ (2/4/07, adopted 5/28/07 from Vietnam), Amelia Rylie (1/14/09), & Ryland Josef William (9/7/05-9/7/05 @ 41 wks). 
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#88 of 221 Old 07-03-2011, 02:09 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

Stormbride,

 

I totally agree that people are quick to blame homeschooling for children's basic personalities. One of my kids is outgoing and bubbly, and when we were homeschooling, I was told repeatedly that the problem was that she wasn't around other kids enough, she wasn't getting enough socialization. My other child is extremely quiet, shy, and easily overwhelmed. I was repeatedly told that the problem was that she wasn't around other kids enough, she wasn't getting enough socialization. It drove me BATTY!

 

Kids are who they are. With my children having the same genes and being raised with the same basic parenting and yet being so opposite, I'm constantly amazed at people believing that our parenting choices determine what our kids are like. And homeschooling is just one of many choices that a parent makes.
 

 


My kids spend 6.5 hours a day, 180 days of the year in a place where other highly qualified and caring adults do things like teach math lessons, led science experiments, facilitate discussions about literature, etc. Yes, I drive my kids to the library, but if you are not putting in more hours than I do on your kids education, then IMHO, your kids are getting short changed.  You really ought to be doing more than me to make up for what your kids aren't getting by going to a wonderful school like the one my kids go to. Why not own up to that?

 

Having done both, it's FAR easier to do all the other stuff (like shopping and taking care of myself) when I have regular breaks from my kids, other people teach them lots of stuff, and they have social options built right into their day. I have less total to do, and more time in which to do it.

 

Having kids in a school *that works for them* is easier and less time consuming that homeschooling.

 

The deal is that not every child has a school available that works for them, and some moms love homeschooling so much that they prefer it even if there is a wonderful school available for their child. That's all OK. I'm not saying school is the best option for every child or every mother. I'm saying that homeschooling takes time and effort to do it well.

 

As far as "struggling over my kids education,"  I have the privilege of having regular conferences with teachers who work my kids all the time and have worked with lots of other kids. I love parent teacher conferences so much. I love being part of a TEAM working on my kids education rather than going it alone.

 

 


Thanks for the thinly veiled insults and snark Linda.  Nice. We're talking past each other.  No one, including me, ever said homeschooling doesn't take time and energy and your comment that my kids, whom you know nothing about, are lacking is uncalled for. But rather typical.

 

I've started and erased a few responses to you about this. It's just not worth it. Every opportunity you can you rail against homeschooling and those who find it to be positve for their kids and personally enjoyable and fulfilling.  You seem unwilling or unable to accept that many of us don't experience the litany of negatives you did and that we all must be hiding something or lying. We're not. Our struggles are no different than those of all parents. That was my point which you seem determined to ignore.  I'm sorry homeschooling was such a bad experience for you and your kids. I'm glad your kids are now in a good place with people who care deeply about their education and who are willing and able to support them so that you don't have to struggle any longer.

 

 


Blessed partner to a great guy, and mama to 4 amazing kids. Unfortunate target of an irrationally angry IRL stalker.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. ~ Buddha

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#89 of 221 Old 07-03-2011, 06:01 PM
 
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Quote:

Having done both, it's FAR easier to do all the other stuff (like shopping and taking care of myself) when I have regular breaks from my kids, other people teach them lots of stuff, and they have social options built right into their day. I have less total to do, and more time in which to do it.

 

As far as "struggling over my kids education,"  I have the privilege of having regular conferences with teachers who work my kids all the time and have worked with lots of other kids. I love parent teacher conferences so much. I love being part of a TEAM working on my kids education rather than going it alone.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quote:

Stating that one of the kids really does best with experienced teachers and the other really works harder when she sees what her peers are up to in core subjects doesn't have squat to do with me and whether or not I'm cut out for homeschooling. 

 

Not a darn thing.

 

It's not about me.

 

 

From your own words it really does come across that it is about you.

 

It seems that you are better able to parent when you are not faced with the tasks of HSing----it does not seem that HS in it self (as I read what the OP wanted) was the issue, more so you had an issue with different aspects and seem not to equate your inability as not the cause here. I'm really baffled by your lack of owing up when you are requesting it from others.

 

I certainly understand how some years things do work and other times they don't. One post you state how great it was yet your children are now better off---comes across as quite a contradiction. 

 

 

It seems unfortunate to lay so much blame on HS the way you are and the push you are asserting that school is far better, when the reality appears that you had trouble (not HS for what it is) and you are the one that is better off. Less to do, more free time, etc.

 

 You keep railing and railing against those that do have a positive experience. I understand it didn't keep working out for you but why keep bashing the way you are?

 

The use of certain words (highly qualified, real teachers, experienced teachers, etc.) that you use come across as extremely demeaning to those who HS.   

 

 

 

I find "spit" offensive & immature--           that's just me------anti-SPIT!


 

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#90 of 221 Old 07-03-2011, 06:48 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AllyRae View Post

YES YES YES!!!!  I agree with all of this!  As a homeschooler AND as a parent who used to have a child in school.  Seriously, I really can't believe people think they can put very very little time and effort into homeschooling and think that's ok.  If you think that's all they're getting at public schools, you really have a warped view of what school is.  And at public school, that responsibility is split between various teachers.  

 

How so? Maybe your system is different, but ds1 had one teacher per year, until 8th grade. That teacher handled all subjects.

 

In any case, I went through the public school system myself, and have had a son in the public school system for the past 13 years. I don't have a warped idea of what that system is. Obviously, it varies from school to school, but I've been profoundly unimpressed. I'm not the best homeschooling parent, but dd1 is getting every bit as good an education as ds1 did, and spending a fraction of the time that he spent on formal studies.

 

With homeschooling, the primary burden of coordinating and providing academic and art instruction, socialization, and enrichment is up to the parent.  That is a huge job.  And part of the reason I have to deal with inlaws that think homeschooling is a joke and is going to ruin our son is because as public school teachers, they were faced with tons of children re-entering the school system after sub-par homeschooling where they were literally given an hour or two a day of instruction and then were left to their own devices (or video games.)  

 

I know homeschooling parents who were public school teachers themselves, and still only spend an hour or so a day on actual instruction. Mind you, most of the homeschooling parents that I've met IRL are very unlikely to leave their kids to video games when they're not being instructed. After being through school myself, and knowing how much of my time was wasted while I was supposedly receiving instruction, I can't even fathom how five hours a day of one-on-one would be close to necessary. (I'm not criticizing. It just boggles my mind. If I could keep my kids focused that long, they'd learn a minimum of twice what I did in any given school day.)

 

When in reality, we have a very wonderful homeschooling community in our area, and judging from talking to other parents, at least 5 hours a day of teaching is the norm, on top of the tremendous amount of effort it takes to make sure you provide opportunities for a well-rounded enriching stimulating development.
 

I think I'll talk about this with some of my local homeschooling friends. We've never discussed actual time spent on instruction, but I don't think any of them come close to five hours a day.

 



 


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