"Specials" (ie. P.E., music, art, library, etc.) - Page 3 - Mothering Forums
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#61 of 90 Old 12-21-2011, 04:50 PM
 
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PE: 4 days per week with specialist PE teacher, 1 day per week with their teacher,  and outdoor recess 3 x 15 min per day

 

Music: 2 per week with specialist music teacher

 

Library: 1 per week with librarian, and a separate library visit with their teacher to borrow books.

 

Art: 1 per week with specialist art teacher, and lots with their classroom teacher 

 

Computers are part of the classroom.

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#62 of 90 Old 12-21-2011, 06:58 PM - Thread Starter
 
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PE: 4 days per week with specialist PE teacher, 1 day per week with their teacher,  and outdoor recess 3 x 15 min per day

 

Music: 2 per week with specialist music teacher

 

Library: 1 per week with librarian, and a separate library visit with their teacher to borrow books.

 

Art: 1 per week with specialist art teacher, and lots with their classroom teacher 

 

Computers are part of the classroom.



This sounds perfect!  Do your children go to a public school? Are you in the US?  Can I move there lol.gif?

 


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#63 of 90 Old 12-21-2011, 10:39 PM
 
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PE: 4 days per week with specialist PE teacher, 1 day per week with their teacher,  and outdoor recess 3 x 15 min per day

lol.gif dd would want to be out of that school sooo fast. she hates even her one day of PE. in first grade her favourite teacher was the PE coach. by second she did not like him anymore coz he makes them do laps. 2 years later he still makes them run laps and dd still hates it. she would prefer anything but running laps. PE for her is torture. 
 

 


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#64 of 90 Old 12-22-2011, 07:18 AM
 
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When we lived in a district with daily PE, the teacher did a good job of mixing up the activities. The goal was to get the kids moving in fun ways. When they had to cancels PE for voting days, they did stuff on nutrition. The whole program was well done.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#65 of 90 Old 12-23-2011, 09:01 AM
 
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I hated PE when I was a kid, too.  It was clear the coaches always thought their real job was football or basketball or whatever, and having to deal with non-athletic students was some sort of punishment.  We did generic exercises while they worked on sports stuff, then we ran laps while they worked on sports stuff.

 

My daughter has PE twice a week and she'd love to have it every day.  She's not an athlete, she uses a walker, and she still loves it.  They have been amazing at integrating her into all activities.  I really wish they could have PE every day.

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#66 of 90 Old 12-28-2011, 03:19 PM
 
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Our small school has 1 FT and another almost FT, plus 3 reading specialists. Since I run the bookfair, I spend some time with them. Its fun because they love reading and I am a bookworm so we (before kindles) exchange books ourselves, they read the NYtimes like I do, and again we both love books so I love working with them on the scholastic book fair. But they have a huge huge library (our previous and present principals were huge reading advocates so even the teachers have several hundred books in their rooms as well. They do the ARs, help with that, run the media lab (PCs etc) keep the library under control, inventory etc. At the end of the book fair, using their scholastic dollars is a blast with them. They also help me choose what is featured at the two fairs we run for a successful sale. I would not want their job, its hectic.
 

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this is from near me - http://schools.nyc.gov/NR/rdonlyres/44A85DA6-DA50-4EB0-9B41-EE981B43F149/15482/LibrarianResponsibilities.pdf

 

 

and no one would even look at you unless you held a masters 

 

all our school have librarians on staff, usually several

 

 



 


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#67 of 90 Old 12-29-2011, 06:47 AM
 
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Wow what a timely thread for me.  We have 2 kids in a very very small private school (not quite 50 kids from Kindergarten up to 4th grade, though there will be a 5th grade next year since we seem to have enough 4th graders planning to stay).  The breakdown for specials is:

PE 30 min 1x week (but we have 3 recesses per day; 2 are 10 min long, one is 30 min long).

Music 30 min 2x week

Art 30 min 1x week

Spanish 20 min 2x week

Computer 30 min 1x week but not for kindergarteners.

 

...and then there is library.  Eek we of course have no librarian and the library is waaay tiny (though our community libraries are large, easily accessible, and well they just plain rock).  I have been asked to volunteer as the librarian for my son's 2nd grade and K classes.  When I first went for the K class, I was given a box with individual activities (and book included).  The breakdown for what the lesson would be and tips for teaching it, etc were all included.  I was a little surprised I didn't know what to expect--I just thought I'd read them a book and let them pick one out their own!  But after reading this thread, hearing what all the other librarians are doing in other schools, etc, I'm really glad our school at least has the box of pre-written activities for the volunteers.  I read through the one posters email with the attachment on librarian responsibilities too; and yes, I have been doing exactly what is written on it (collaborating with the teacher on what she's interested in having the kids learn, whether it correlates with the class activity, helping the kids pick out age-appropriate books, teaching them about the spine and how the filing system works, refiling books, etc)--but no, I actually don't have any training whatsoever in library science, however I do have a masters in public health and work in research for a living, so I'm no stranger to using literature for more than just enjoying a story.  I guess what I'm saying is I'm a little intimidated but also equally surprised at the strong emails indicating that an educated and dedicated parent volunteer can't do what is required.  Mooinmama, I like one of your posts for that reason.  Though isn't that sort of thinking exactly why people end up homeschooling?  We also almost homeschooled, and my husband and myself, though again a little intimidated at the prospect of teaching every subject ourselves, nonetheless didn't want to limit ourselves into believing that only experts qualify to teach. 

 

 

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#68 of 90 Old 12-29-2011, 08:14 AM
 
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We also almost homeschooled, and my husband and myself, though again a little intimidated at the prospect of teaching every subject ourselves, nonetheless didn't want to limit ourselves into believing that only experts qualify to teach.

things have a lot to do with location!

 

not only for a school librarians this goes for fire depts (as an example) some demand only paid departments and other can be volunteers - in my state we have both BUT tons of regulations have resulted as of this that requires volunteers to have undergone certified training 

 

some states super lazy homeschool regulations or none at all and others are massively regulated 

some private schools get away with things others are unable to do


 

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#69 of 90 Old 12-29-2011, 09:55 AM
 
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some states super lazy homeschool regulations or none at all and others are massively regulated 

some private schools get away with things others are unable to do


But do the outcomes vary? I've never seen any evidence to suggest that they do. I live in a jurisdiction with "super lazy homeschool regulations" and yet standardized testing results of the students enrolled in the most laid-back unschooling umbrella program are still at least on par with those in traditional schools. I think that the mentality that experts need to teach every little skill is increasingly pervasive throughout our society, regardless of local or state regulations. Renegade DIY'ers may have more opportunity in low-regulation areas, but they're still swimming against the tide of a Culture of Specialists.

 

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#70 of 90 Old 12-30-2011, 07:31 AM
 
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My kids elementary specials Gr 1-5 are:

 

Spanish 1x/week

Art 1x/week

PE 3x/week

Library 1x/week

Music 2x/week

Computer 1x/week

Also have 1 day/week GATE type classes all day grades 4 and 5.

 

We are in a school district that spends a lot of money.  Student to teacher ratio is <24 avg (which means you can have all 5th grade classes have 29 students when the school is full).

 

Middle school starts in 6th grade.

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#71 of 90 Old 12-30-2011, 10:32 AM
 
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But do the outcomes vary? I've never seen any evidence to suggest that they do

In my state HS are thrown in with PS for testing results and you have no way of knowing.

 

What has been released in my state is the performance of charter schools and that has been dismal! My states is now talking about legislation to limit charter funding based on poor performance and several schools have been closed. Regionally (here) the charter schools have acted much as private with heavy parent input as described here.

Private in my state seem to make their own rules and everyone will tell you that are just great, so you have no real guide because they pick and choose what they want to show and how the performance is presented- at least with the charters they were held to the state standard and that is showing they are failing.


 

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#72 of 90 Old 12-30-2011, 10:52 AM
 
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My kids dislike running laps.  They are active kids and the one kid who was a sitter learned that martial arts count as a "sport" and changed her identity as a non-active kid.  They all learned to ride bikes that year too.

 

My kids in general have disliked the PE teachers in elementary and have both widely acclaimed the PE teachers in the middle school because they do ALL KINDS of things to show the kids that being active is fun, like obstacle course, etc.  They even learn to like running b/c they learn base heart rate and the teachers are encouraging rather than pushy/competitive, which just makes my kids balk.  So I've told my younger kids to just "hang in there" for MS; hasn't been a real problem.  I really appreciate teachers that try to make it very fun.  Makes a huge difference for the kids.

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#73 of 90 Old 01-01-2012, 10:17 AM
 
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We have a pretty good public system and I always feel lucky when I read these threads.  DD is in 2nd grade.  

 

Recess 3X per Day

PE 2X per week with specialist

Library 1X per week with MS trained librarian and 2 parents

Music 1X per week with trained teacher

Art 1X per week (but they draw every day in class) with MS trained teacher

Computers - used to be once a week but I think the teacher decided it was kind of a waste of time for their age and I agree

 

I'm fine with this level because I feel they get plenty of time outside to play and burn off energy, and I would prefer them in the classroom.  She used to go to a private school with gym and art almost every day, and I felt they were moving around too much and actually didn't get enough classroom time.  The Montessori model is 3 hours of uninterrupted classroom time, and I can completely see the benefit of that, rather than jumping from special to special, especially if they are of questionable value or quality.  

 

Our art teacher is 100% paid by fund-raising from the PTO which I think is the case for every school in our district.  

 

These threads also depress me because I am always surprised the number of people who don't think we need trained art teachers or librarians.  :(  I  also have to laugh at the idea of getting rid of duplication of the elementary school library!  Spending school time to bus over to our public library.  Seriously?  I would find that a huge waste of my kid's time. Our school library is open at lunch and DD goes there at least once a week during recess.  She brings two books home every week.  We live in a fairly well-off district, but there are still kids who don't have books at home, and their parents don't take them to the library.  I remember my school library being a haven for me as an advanced reader, and it is the same for DD.  Please don't touch the elementary school library!  

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I  also have to laugh at the idea of getting rid of duplication of the elementary school library!  Spending school time to bus over to our public library.  Seriously?  I would find that a huge waste of my kid's time. Our school library is open at lunch and DD goes there at least once a week during recess.  She brings two books home every week.  We live in a fairly well-off district, but there are still kids who don't have books at home, and their parents don't take them to the library.  I remember my school library being a haven for me as an advanced reader, and it is the same for DD.  Please don't touch the elementary school library!  


Look, it may not be practical in your town, but I think your mocking response was a little rude. My suggestion was specifically for places like my town where the school and the library are both central and accessible (they're *one block* apart -- it takes less time to get to the community library than to the lower school soccer field) and where numbers and funds are too small to justify sufficient resources in either location. 

 

Yes, I'm serious. 

 

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#75 of 90 Old 01-02-2012, 08:12 AM
 
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I  also have to laugh at the idea of getting rid of duplication of the elementary school library!  Spending school time to bus over to our public library.  Seriously?  I would find that a huge waste of my kid's time. Our school library is open at lunch and DD goes there at least once a week during recess.  She brings two books home every week.  We live in a fairly well-off district, but there are still kids who don't have books at home, and their parents don't take them to the library.  I remember my school library being a haven for me as an advanced reader, and it is the same for DD.  Please don't touch the elementary school library!  


Look, it may not be practical in your town, but I think your mocking response was a little rude. My suggestion was specifically for places like my town where the school and the library are both central and accessible (they're *one block* apart -- it takes less time to get to the community library than to the lower school soccer field) and where numbers and funds are too small to justify sufficient resources in either location. 

 

Yes, I'm serious. 

 

Miranda

I totally agree with Miranda!

 

some people simply do not get that not all states have mandates and or the resources to have it ALL!

 

There clearly is a need to rid schools of duplicate programs when more funding is available in the private sector that would benefit the masses.

 

must be nice to pay the high taxes to live in a well off district and dictate to others when they don't live in that standard


 

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#76 of 90 Old 01-02-2012, 09:24 AM
 
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must be nice to pay the high taxes to live in a well off district and dictate to others when they don't live in that standard

 

 

I never mentioned where I live.  Sounds like you're mocking me!  Actually our district has a wide span of income base, so that's not really the explanation. The community really values education though.  

 

In any case, exactly none of our 8 elementary schools are within walking distance of our community library.  So are you arguing that we spend valuable class time to bus kids over, which also costs money?  Once a week for all 12 classes in our school?  I think it's a faulty perspective that parents will take their kids to the library and they don't need school libraries.  I would argue actually that lower income areas need the school libraries even more because kids have fewer books at home.  I know some kids in our what you refer to as our "well-off district" only have 1-2 books to their name and the school library is their only opportunity to bring books home.  It is hard for me to understand how we don't need libraries.  And what private sector options are you referring to?  I'm sorry I don't have a lot of faith in the private sector.    

 

Just being honest.  I'm just sad that people would offer up their school libraries.  So I disagree with your proposal.  

 

 

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#77 of 90 Old 01-02-2012, 09:48 AM
 
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 We live in a fairly well-off district,

 

 

where can you live that "fairly well-off" and have that mean low taxes?

 

that's not realistic in my state - each district (county) pays their own-what tiny bit the state and feds give each school district is not near enough to educate the students or even keep schools open- 2/3 comes from taxes (in my state that is property taxes)


 

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#78 of 90 Old 01-02-2012, 09:51 AM
 
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And what private sector options are you referring to?

my post #45

 

my local libraries not the school district offer FAR more


 

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#79 of 90 Old 01-02-2012, 10:27 AM
 
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In any case, exactly none of our 8 elementary schools are within walking distance of our community library.  So are you arguing that we spend valuable class time to bus kids over, which also costs money?  Once a week for all 12 classes in our school?  ...

 

Just being honest.  I'm just sad that people would offer up their school libraries.  So I disagree with your proposal.  


If you have 12 classes in your school and your district is fairly well-off, it no doubt makes fiscal sense to pay for a school library and librarian. Guess how many classes our primary school has? Three ... and they're all under 20 students. It makes no sense to pay for a school library and librarian if the community library is simultaneously trying to provide the library services to the exact same 49 kids. 

 

You seem to have missed this part of my suggestion both times, so this time I'll put it in italics:

 

There is no point in duplicating services "where numbers and funds are too small to justify sufficient resources in either location."

 

If the italics don't apply to your situation, that's great. Keep your school library. 

 

As I said upthread, our high school and community resources have been very successfully merged in the case of fitness equipment / weight room. There is now considerably more access amongst schoolchildren and community members than there would have been if these functions had been duplicated. In the case of the library issue we're actually trying to move things the other way .... to merge the community library into the school. The main issue is of course weekend and summer access. 

 

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#80 of 90 Old 01-02-2012, 01:37 PM
 
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Ya know, not every community needs to find the same solutions to problems.  What works for some don't work for all.  Right?

 

I see advantages and disadvantages to what folks are suggesting here.  Nope, what's suggested here wouldn't even work as a stop-gap in my community considering geography and other needs.  Who's to say that won't work elsewhere?

 

I always find this aspect of MDC puzzling.  Folks seem to forget that just because some solutions won't work some places doesn't mean that it shouldn't be implemented anywhere.

 

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#81 of 90 Old 01-05-2012, 03:47 PM
 
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This sounds perfect!  Do your children go to a public school? Are you in the US?  Can I move there lol.gif?

 


Canada. But yes, public school.

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#82 of 90 Old 01-05-2012, 09:36 PM
 
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my post #45

 

my local libraries not the school district offer FAR more


 

Post #45 talks about private donations to "community libraries".  Which in my area would be publicly funded. Do you have privately funded free libraries?  I have never heard of that, but it sounds like a wonderful thing.  In my area, public funding goes to support both schools and libraries, so they all sort of suffer along in parallel.  Ours just closed on Sundays which is tough for many parents.  

 

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#83 of 90 Old 01-06-2012, 06:51 AM - Thread Starter
 
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The community library idea would work well in some places, but in our town, the community library stinks and is totally inaccessible other than by car.  They don't have a fully funded children's librarian there either.  Honestly, if my schools stink, and my public library stinks, I'm starting to wonder where my +$9,000/year in property taxes are actually going???


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#84 of 90 Old 01-06-2012, 05:23 PM
 
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Post #45 talks about private donations to "community libraries".  Which in my area would be publicly funded. Do you have privately funded free libraries?

 

post # 45 - http://www.accesspa.state.pa.us/

 if you look under the "Information for the public" section you will see "borrow a book" --- that means the regular citizen (homeschooled child, private school child, public, etc) has FAR MORE access to get books vs the public school systems- in my state you can not get a book (if you are in the public schools) from other districts-only within your own (that means- small district small number of books)----that means you have far less access to materials-but if you are in Philly and want a book that is in Pittsburgh you can get via the public accesspa system - if you have a tiny library and you want lots of books- they can get them for you

 

this is a few year's old but it explains about funding and it's a very common thing in my area for the mill tax moines as well as private donations (giving death bequests is a very big deal as well as tons of sales yearly) - http://library.utah.gov/programs/development/statistics/documents/PaLA_report_interior.pdf

some are private - http://www.grundylibrary.org/general.html

some are both - http://articles.mcall.com/2011-05-26/news/mc-pa-library-tax-dollars-20110526_1_library-subsidy-pennsylvania-libraries-system-of-higher-education

some are strictly public in PA

 

privately funded and YES FREE!

 

 

 

 

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I'm starting to wonder where my +$9,000/year in property taxes are actually going???

not like you want to hear it- but that is cheap! I know people 20 minutes away from me in NJ paying even more!

 

 

my state also allows residents to borrow from "state" funded universities (with the exception of one university-unless that has changed??) - ex. Penn State  (and PS satellite schools are in almost every county-not just main) -http://www.libraries.psu.edu/psul/lending/borrowingprivileges.html#residents

 

 

 

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Pennsylvania residents are eligible to register for a Resident Borrowers Card at Penn State library locations throughout the state and may borrow up to 100 circulating items. 

 

 

most private colleges/univ will allow you to do research and vary on their borrowing

 

perhaps some can see why funding the public school libraries (at least in most of my state) is redundant 

 


 

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#85 of 90 Old 01-07-2012, 04:08 PM
 
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My kids go to a different school in the same district.

 

DS is in 1st grade and has the following specials (all taught by teachers certified in their fields.

 

  • Music- 1x per week
  • P.E.- 2x per week
  • Art- 1x per week
  • Spanish- 3x per week
  • Library- 1x per week in kindergarten. On demand and for project work in grades 1-5.

 

Computer work is done in the classroom. Each classroom has multiple computers and a SMART board. There are also computers in the library for student use.

 

The school library is staffed by a librarian and assistant librarian. The librarian also oversees the school's Book Room which is the respository for all the books used in the school's Guided Reading Program.

 

 

I can't imagine if our schools didn't have libraries in them. For the next year, our public library will be located in a small mall (with pretty limited space.) They are doing a huge renovation and addition to our public library. I can't wait for it to be done. And the temporary space is smallllllll.

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Originally Posted by beanma View Post

I think this is getting into a parents vs specialized teachers thing which is a false dichotomy. Many teachers are parents, y'all. Many parents are teachers. In my state, at least, there is a lateral entry program so folks who don't have an education degree, but have an interest in teaching can become qualified to teach in our public schools. I think it's great! Some of the best teachers my kids have had have not had graduate degrees in education and some haven't even finished college. We had a the privilege of having an awesome artist/performer/musician/homeschooling dad for several years in the private school we were at before public school and I couldn't have asked for a better teacher for my kids, but he didn't have a degree. He was awesome with kids, though, and gifted in both arts and gifted in teaching (loved math). I think it's way more about the person than the piece of paper. 

 

We don't have dedicated "library" specials in our school although we do have a full time awesome librarian with oodles of experience and an assistant librarian, too, and a very nice sized media center and book collection, too (probably about 4000-5000 sq feet). They don't teach library, though. That sounds kinda weird to me, too. I loooooooove me some library, though, and librarians, and am friends with many traditional librarians and folks with MLS degrees both (there's a highly regarded MLS program in our area). In our school, though, research skills are taught in the classroom. I'm sure the librarians must help with it when the kids come to the library, but I haven't heard about it. We have a separate tech lab for typing skills and computer instruction that is not in the library or associated with it. They use computers in the classroom to do research and learn about writing and reading in the classroom. 

 

So, in our current public school, we have tons of resources, and specialized teachers for all the specials (though library is not a special) and it's great. However, I don't think the instruction is better in many ways than the small private school where they had the awesome non-degreed assistant teacher I described above and other parent volunteers. We did have great teachers at the private school with degrees, too, but not all of them had completed their education or intended to go on to get a degree (asst teacher above). We had an awesome art teacher, Sarah, there who was finishing up her masters, but hadn't completed it yet. She rocked and truthfully, while I like the art teacher at the public school and the kids do, too, she can't compare to Sarah who had a complete curriculum of her own devising and used lots of different media, etc. 

 

 



 

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#86 of 90 Old 01-07-2012, 09:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by serenbat View Post

 

 

 

 

post # 45 - http://www.accesspa.state.pa.us/

 if you look under the "Information for the public" section you will see "borrow a book" --- that means the regular citizen (homeschooled child, private school child, public, etc) has FAR MORE access to get books vs the public school systems- in my state you can not get a book (if you are in the public schools) from other districts-only within your own (that means- small district small number of books)----that means you have far less access to materials-but if you are in Philly and want a book that is in Pittsburgh you can get via the public accesspa system - if you have a tiny library and you want lots of books- they can get them for you

 

this is a few year's old but it explains about funding and it's a very common thing in my area for the mill tax moines as well as private donations (giving death bequests is a very big deal as well as tons of sales yearly) - http://library.utah.gov/programs/development/statistics/documents/PaLA_report_interior.pdf

some are private - http://www.grundylibrary.org/general.html

some are both - http://articles.mcall.com/2011-05-26/news/mc-pa-library-tax-dollars-20110526_1_library-subsidy-pennsylvania-libraries-system-of-higher-education

some are strictly public in PA

 

privately funded and YES FREE!

 

I am curious, can public schools in your area use Interlibrary Loan? I have my college students use it.  I have never asked if my kids' school can use it, but I do not think it is likely going to be an issue at the elementary level.  I do not see libraries in schools as duplication.  They are a resource that is easy to access.  In our case, easier than the local library, which does not always have enough of the in demand books and often has waiting lists even longer than the schools.   Like some of the other posters,  I live in a community that would require bussing to get kids to the public library from all of the schools.  The district is already spread thin with the cost of bussing, and parents have to drive for field trips.  I can not see it as a viable option here, but I can only speak for my area.  Plus I would rather invest in books that benefit many instead of bussing.

 

Also, I do know that my local public library does receive donations.  They take donations from families, business, and organizations to include programming and increase their collection.  There is also a foundation that does fundraisers and donates specifically to the library.  

 

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#87 of 90 Old 01-08-2012, 09:13 AM
 
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Quote:
I am curious, can public schools in your area use Interlibrary Loan?

some can -if they meet the requirements for the program

 

some simply don't (ALSO I don't know of any private schools in the area that do and most are very small and have tiny or zero libraries)

 

if you searched by the area you would see that some participate and others do not even within the same district (it is not mandated- as with several things about education in PA!) most teachers I know only use inner-district book loans


 

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Private Montessori and the kids get 1 day each week for gym,art,music,and language(this year french last year spanish).Gym is sometimes longer than an hour if they go to the the Y to swim or skating.Other classes are an hour or less.

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#89 of 90 Old 01-21-2012, 04:09 PM
 
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My children are in 2nd grade at a private Montessori school.

 

music - 1x/week (in 3rd year they start having 1x/week music and 1x/week recorder lessons)

art - 1x/week

yoga - 1x/week

keyboarding - 1x/week

structured/creative writing - 1 or 2x's/week

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#90 of 90 Old 01-30-2012, 07:16 AM
 
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I teach in the public K-8 school that my daughter is in for K this year. The length of specials varies slightly by grade (they get longer as kids get into middle school grades), but they are 30-50 minutes long. We have:

 

Art 2 times a week (3 when the 4/5 class is doing pottery)

Music 2 times a week (3 for middle school)

PE 2 times a week

French 3 times a week

Guidance 1 time a week (they call it "Drama" in K/1 since it's all about role-play)

Library 1 time a week

Last year middle school also did yoga 1 time a week, but for some reason we aren't doing it this year, which I'm bummed about.

 

Computers is not a separate class. K/1 has computers in the room for specials, 2-5 use the lab for keyboarding once a week and for other projects and also use a travelling basket of netbooks for math practice in the classroom. 6-8 kids all have their own MacBook, which are seamlessly integrated into their core classes.

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