Second-grader acting out in school, need help - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 25 Old 12-12-2011, 06:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Ugh, we're at a loss with my 7-year-old son and I don't know what to do.  He's "that" kid at school - the mouthy one, the mean one, you all know what I'm talking about.  He's a very smart kid, he was tested through the district last year and scored at the high end for all of the areas.  The counselor told me she'd consider him one of the brighter kids in his grade.  You wouldn't know it by his everyday work, though.  His teacher just told me he's on level for reading and below level for math (which is a huge surprise to me, he's always scored extremely high in math).  She said he's so concerned with being the first one done that he makes sloppy mistakes just so he can be first.  He's like that with everything - has to be first in line, has to be first one finished with his work, has to win every race, etc.  Along with that, he always has to be right.  She also told me that when she gives suggestions on how he can improve his work he completely shuts down and starts arguing, refusing to do any more work.  He argues with his teachers, he argues with his classmates, he calls other kids names, he's even pushed kids or hit them with his backpack so he could be first in line.  I'm at a loss.  So is his teacher, I think.  I have no idea where to go with this.  I've tried sitting down and having a calm conversation about his behaviors but he starts arguing and yelling, I've tried grounding him, I've tried ignoring the behavior, nothing works.  It seems like it's getting worse.  Does anyone have some wisdom for me?  I don't want my kid turning into a bully, I don't want him losing all of his friends, but it looks like that's the track he's going down.


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#2 of 25 Old 12-12-2011, 07:50 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CallMeMommy View Post

She said he's so concerned with being the first one done that he makes sloppy mistakes just so he can be first.  He's like that with everything - has to be first in line, has to be first one finished with his work, has to win every race, etc.  Along with that, he always has to be right.  She also told me that when she gives suggestions on how he can improve his work he completely shuts down and starts arguing, refusing to do any more work.


 

oh my -- that was me in 2nd grade. yikes2.gif

 

I have no advice, but I little reassurance. I didn't stay like that. I think 2nd grade is a tough year for bright kids because often, there's no new content. It's sorta of a repeat of first grade.

 

Even though he's current work does not reflect his abilities, I would advocate for him working ahead or going to 3rd grade for at least one subject. I was so bored, and my little game of always being first, regardless of quality, was far more entertaining to me than any of the school work I was given. And because I knew that I was the smartest kid in my class, I did NOT take correction well and would argue with the teacher.

 

(I'm not even that smart, just smarter than the other 19 kids who happened to be in my 2nd grade class).
 

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#3 of 25 Old 12-13-2011, 07:42 AM
 
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~~ I know I'm posting a lot of information, a lot of which may ultimately not be relevant to you, but I had to figure this out largely on my own and I hope to save you some head scratching innocent.gif. ~~

 

Ds was like this in K (doing sloppy work to be first, always having to be first, always having to be right, argueing with teachers/classmates, pushing to get somewhere/his place in line, shutting down and/or arguing when work is corrected and/or improvements suggested) and to a lesser extent in 1st grade; traces of that behavior remain today, though it's usually because something else is "off" (hungry, tired, mentally exhausted, etc.). Though part of the issue was boredom, in ds' case he was also dealing with ADHD and Asperger's--which we didn't know in K. By the start of 1st grade was seeing a behavior management therapist weekly (for 6 months, then every two weeks for another 4 months).

 

How is the school handling the discipline issues? My ds had a thick stack of discipline forms in his file in K by this point in the year, and about 1/3 that in first grade; in both years he was on the road to a disciplinary hearing, but this year he is part of the special education program and has procedural/legal protections he didn't have before--though his discipline issues this year are very minor compared to past years (usually involving a single daily instance of breaking a specific rule, though occasionally it's crawling under desks/acting "silly" if the teacher has to step out for a minute). His social skills are a lot better than last year, though still not typical for his age. If his discipline issues did escalate he would now be legally entitled to a manifestation hearing before a disciplinary hearing could take place.

 

If you decide to request the school do education/disability testing, you need to "start the clock" in your letter of request; the school has 60 days from the date they received parental consent for evaluation to do one; your written request should note that this letter is the consent for evaluation. (And, if you did not do it in writing, it never happened!); related links below....

 

It may seem like jumping the gun or otherwise a big deal to "go formal" with the school but it can be difficult to get schools to listen, particularly when there are behavioral problems, if you're not part of the formal process. An upside to the "formal process" can be getting all the "players" in one place at the same time, and having a written plan that everyone can reference.

 

[ We had an eval done in mid-first grade at a behavior clinic at a children's hospital; the eval team included a developmental-behavioral pediatrician, a speech-language pathologist, and psychologist. It was 9 months between the time I submitted the paperwork for the appointment and the actual appointment; if I had contacted the clinic when I first discovered it, our appointment would have been in September of 1st grade, not February. By the time of the clinic eval he already had an ADHD diagnosis from a psychiatrist, but a previous eval by an OT led her to suggest that he should be evaluated for Asperger's, and I wasn't convinced that the ADHD diagnosis told the whole story. The clinic eval carried a lot of weight with the school and caused them to suggest ds be evaluated by the school to see if he qualified for services; he is currently receiving speech therapy at school for social reciprocity and pragmatics, and for articulation issues with "s" and "z" ]

 

Behavior Management and Schools:

 

Behavior Management and School-Related Behavior ... - Wrightslaw

 

Behavior Management and Appropriate School Response: FBAs, BIPs, & IEEs

 

It Isn't OK Just to Teach the Easy Kids

 

Behavior and Discipline...Wrightslaw

 

Evaluations...Wrightslaw

 

Functional Behavior Assessments & Behavior Intervention Plans

"Behavior Management and Appropriate School Response:
FBAs, BIPs, & IEEs
- "Describes the purposes of Functional Behavioral Assessments (FBA) and explain what a Behavioral Intervention Plan (BIP) should look like."

 

An IEP Team's Introduction to Functional Behavioral Assessment and Behavior Intervention Plans - "Describes the IEP team's responsibility to do a functional behavioral assessment to identify the cause of the child's behavior and develop positive behavioral interventions and supports to address problem behavior."

Functional Behavioral Assessment & Positive Interventions: What Parents Need to Know by Dixie Jordan. "Article describes strategies parents and teachers can use to assess problem behavior and teach appropriate behavior skills to children."

 

Functional Behavioral Assessments: What? Why? When? Where? Who? Describes "problem behaviors, functional behavior assessments, environmental manipulation, and qualifications and training of evaluators."

 

Evaluations/Testing by the School:

Determining Eligibility: How Many Days is 60 Days? - Wrightslaw

The Art of Writing Letters by Pam and Pete Wright - Advocacy ...

 

504s / IEPs:

 

Eligibility under IDEA for Other Health Impaired Children

 

Key Differences Between Section 504, the ADA, and the IDEA.

 

 

Quote:

Under IDEA/IEP, if your child has a disability that adversely affects educational performance, your child is entitled to an education that is designed to meet the child's unique needs and from which your child receives educational benefit.

 

A 504 is helping your child get the same education that everyone else is getting--more for a student that needs accommodations to help them learn (like sitting next to the teacher) or for behavior, and that they are not punished for things that they cannot control due to the ADHD (like needing to work standing up or not sit inside a group).

 

[A IEP or 504 is not an escalation or punishment for the teacher/school. It's more about getting all appropriate parties involved and on the same page. The student, parent/legal guardian, teachers, principals, Pupil Services administrators, support staff (i.e. nurse, counselor, psychologist, language/speech pathologist) as well as the student's physician or therapist may be involved in the placement process including the 504 meeting.]

 


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#4 of 25 Old 12-13-2011, 11:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
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OMG Emmeline you are a font of knowledge, do you know that?  Yes, my DS has already been tested by the district and has a formal diagnosis of ADHD by his pediatrician but doesn't have an IEP or 504.  I'm going to pore over those links you posted.  You have no idea how much it means to me to know that my kid isn't the only one acting like this!

 

In the meantime, I was able to talk to DS last night about what's been going on, and he said the reason he's rushing through is work is because it's boring and too easy.  So again, it leads me to him not being challenged more than just misbehaving for the sake of it.  I'm going to call his teacher this afternoon and talk to her in person, too, hopefully I can get through some of those links beforehand and have some suggestions for her.


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#5 of 25 Old 12-13-2011, 02:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CallMeMommy View Post

OMG Emmeline you are a font of knowledge, do you know that?  Yes, my DS has already been tested by the district and has a formal diagnosis of ADHD by his pediatrician but doesn't have an IEP or 504.  I'm going to pore over those links you posted.  You have no idea how much it means to me to know that my kid isn't the only one acting like this!

 

In the meantime, I was able to talk to DS last night about what's been going on, and he said the reason he's rushing through is work is because it's boring and too easy.  So again, it leads me to him not being challenged more than just misbehaving for the sake of it.  I'm going to call his teacher this afternoon and talk to her in person, too, hopefully I can get through some of those links beforehand and have some suggestions for her.


I agree- Emmeline is GREAT!

 

 

First, see if they can make any school accommodations and see if it makes a difference in his behavior (differentiation so he is challenged, behavior plans, etc)

 

Then, I would look into a 504 if it persists. If you think ADHD may be contributing to his performance and ability to function in the classroom (vs his ability) then he could benefit from atypical accommodations that may help ( movement to keep the silliness undercontrol, seating so that he does not as aware of other kids finishing work faster, checklist of what to do when done, social skills class, etc). If he is bright and he is not AT LEAST at grade level, something needs to be done.

 

They may explore ODD as well-- without *knowing* him better it is hard to tell from a snippet of info online, but ODD and Aspergers both have some of the traits you describe.

 

A testing situation (which he did well in) and a classroom setting are very different--- somehow he is achieving in the testing situation and not the classroom. So work with the teacher : is it the one on one, is it the noise, it is the length of time, it is the work presented, is it his atttitude? Or a combo?

 

 

Hope you get some solutions soon!

 

 

 

 

 

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#6 of 25 Old 12-14-2011, 06:07 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I talked with his teacher.  I really like her, can I just say that?  She said for a teacher to take the reins and push for a formal intervention it takes forever.  She'd have to attempt 3 behavior interventions, have them all fail, then ask for testing, which could take upwards of 12 weeks, so it'd be beginning of 3rd grade before anything is in place.  And she's already on the 2nd behavior intervention (with my knowledge, of course, she hasn't done anything behind my back).  But she gave me the case facilitator's name and number and said if I wanted, I could call and ask to speed things up since requests from parents move faster.  His teacher said at this point she thinks we're heading towards an IEP and possibly some pull-out group activities for behavior modification, which I'm totally okay with.  So my next step is calling the case facilitator and asking to speed up the process.  I'd be happy with just the behavior modification groups, to be honest (I really hate the term "behavior modification", it makes it sound like something you do with a pet!).  I think once he can get that under control it'll pull everything else together.


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#7 of 25 Old 12-14-2011, 08:11 AM
 
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In addition to calling, I'd write a real letter (on paper with a date and signature) and mail it or drop it by the school. This is a legal document. The school has to function within certain time guidelines, and this letter starts the clock ticking.
 

It does take awhile to sort things out and get things in place. redface.gif


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#8 of 25 Old 12-14-2011, 12:21 PM
 
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Originally Posted by CallMeMommy View PostSo my next step is calling the case facilitator and asking to speed up the process.

 

You need to consent in writing; the school needs written permission to do evaluations so if the facilitator doesn't ask you to come in and sign paperwork today/tomorrow in that phone call, write the letter, drop it off, and note the day/time/person you gave it to. Follow-up with e-mails as well.

 

You need to "start the clock" in your letter of request; the school has 60 days from the date they received parental consent for evaluation to do one; your written request should note that this letter is the consent for evaluation. (And, if you did not do it in writing, it never happened!).

 

Remember, with the holidays coming up you probably have 1-2 weeks where no one will be doing anything at school.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by CallMeMommy: I'd be happy with just the behavior modification groups, to be honest (I really hate the term "behavior modification", it makes it sound like something you do with a pet!).  I think once he can get that under control it'll pull everything else together.

 

As it was put to me, once you buy a ticket (get the eval) you can ride any ride at the carnival (any service offered).

 

I recommend reading "From Emotions to Advocacy". If you can't get if from a library, the cheapest I've found it is the e-book from Amazon.


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#9 of 25 Old 12-14-2011, 12:22 PM
 
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#10 of 25 Old 01-08-2012, 07:24 AM
 
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I agree with the others. YOU need to be the one to initiate the process. The teacher's process is a completely separate thing. She asks for support through the Student Support Team (or whatever it's called where you are.) You are looking for a special education evaluation.

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#11 of 25 Old 01-08-2012, 03:50 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Yep, and that's what we're getting. We have a meeting with the special ed team on the 27th.  I'll update then.  I think it's just to decide which path we're going and what testing/evaluations he needs.  I've been scouring the wrightslaw website but if anyone has any BTDT insights for me I'd sure appreciate it!  So far the school has been very forthcoming, everything people have told me to ask for in this thread they brought up on their own, plus it's the school with the most special ed kids in the district, so I'm not anticipating having to fight for anything but obviously I won't be letting my guard down. 


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#12 of 25 Old 01-09-2012, 07:55 AM
 
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Yep, and that's what we're getting. We have a meeting with the special ed team on the 27th.  I'll update then.  I think it's just to decide which path we're going and what testing/evaluations he needs.  I've been scouring the wrightslaw website but if anyone has any BTDT insights for me I'd sure appreciate it!  So far the school has been very forthcoming, everything people have told me to ask for in this thread they brought up on their own, plus it's the school with the most special ed kids in the district, so I'm not anticipating having to fight for anything but obviously I won't be letting my guard down. 


Wrightslaw has a 1.5hr CD-ROM where Peter Wright breaks down evaluation tests--how they're scored, what the scores mean, and things that could interfere with getting an accurate assessment (such as a left-handed child's score being penalized for repeatedly lifting their hand on the coding subtest of the WISC-IV). This info is in Chapter 11 of 'Emotions to Advocacy' and some or all of it is on their website as well. Ds is going to do his big eval in two weeks (he had one for speech earlier in the year) so I'm doing a lot of reading now and organizing his paperwork.

 


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#13 of 25 Old 01-09-2012, 03:50 PM
 
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Just one more thought b/c you mention him being very bright.  One of my children is twice exceptional (highly gifted with ADD and possibly something else going on). 

 

Don't settle simply for addressing your ds' weaknesses.  He is still a very intelligent person even if he can't show the full extent of his ability b/c he has something standing in his way.  If they can find a way to support his challenges, he may better be able to work to his ability.  I'd try for appropriate educational placement based on ability with support for weaknesses.  For example, my other kiddo (who isn't totally twice exceptional, per se, but has significantly slower processing speed than ability) is accelerated with a 504 plan for extra time if needed so she can work at an appropriate level but not be overwhelmed by quantity.  For her, we've seen the accommodations become less and less needed over time, but, as I said, she has fewer challenges than my other dd.

 

I'd see if they can group him in a higher group for his strongest area or try limited pull outs (if they are offered) or subject acceleration and see if he focuses better with greater challenge.

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#14 of 25 Old 01-12-2012, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'll definitely be pushing for more acceleration in his better areas.  The gifted and talented program doesn't start until 3rd grade, but at the beginning of the year his teacher had said she was going to be in touch with the coordinator to see if there were activities for ds (and a couple other kids in her class) the coordinator would recommend.  So I'll definitely bring that up and push for it.


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#15 of 25 Old 01-24-2012, 07:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Little update, we had the meeting with the school yesterday (they had a conflict on Friday morning and asked if they could bump it up).  It was just a meeting with the special ed team to decide if his symptoms warranted further testing, which they agreed they did.  So now they'll do the full run of testing on him (last year they only did the WISC summary test, this year they'll do the entire test, plus a couple of other ones), have him observed in class, get some opinions, etc.  And then they'll decide on an IEP, but it sounds like he'd qualify just because of his ADD diagnosis.  The facilitator said she thought it'd be end of March/early April before that was all done and we'd meet again about the results and our options.

 

His teacher was there, so I was able to talk to her about a couple of things.  I brought up him flying through is work because it was too easy, and she said she didn't think that was it because there are always "stretching" activities aside from the assigned work that go along with what they're learning, and the kids know about them, but every time he finishes he says he's done, he's bored, what next, etc., and doesn't take the initiative to do any of the other activities.  Another thing she initiated on her own is having DS be a peer for a younger kid (a first-grader) that's struggling in class like he is, and I thought it was a really great idea.  I guess the idea is that in the morning DS will meet up with his "buddy" and together they'll read a story about whatever the other kid seems to be struggling with (as identified by his teacher) and DS talks with the kid about what to do and what not to do.  He seemed really excited about it, so I hope it goes well.

 

And one thing I forgot to mention earlier is that as far as pull-outs, they do have the grade split up for math and reading so there's a below-level group, an on-level group, and an above-level group, so he is getting more appropriate work in those areas at least.  And for his "specials" (art and music) the teachers are having him sit up with them and "assist" with some things, and it seems to be helping the meltdowns in those classes too.  Not completely, but there's some improvement.


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#16 of 25 Old 01-24-2012, 08:59 AM
 
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edited because i reread and missed the part that this wasn't an academic tutoring situation but a behavioral one. Sorry, my post isn't really relevant lol. I'm glad you feel some progress was made. I did want to comment on something just as a "what to watch for" sort of thing. As nice as it sounds that he'd be helping out another child, it's a tactic that does not often work with gifted kids (bright, studious high achievers sure, gifted kids, not so much.)  Gifted kids that age have little understanding as to how others learn and are often impatient with a child who perhaps needs a lot of repetition or has to take steps the gifted child never had to take. Tutoring other kids puts the tutor in the position of spending MORE time on remedial work than when they just did it themselves. It's a situation that usually ends with both parties frustrated. Now, there are some kids who are great at it and maybe your son is one of them but keep an eye on it and don't be too hard on him if he is unhappy with the situation. My eldest wasn't a good teacher until recently (she's 14) and she pretty much had to go through a year of training and experience as a classroom aide to get there (and this is in theatre arts, not academics.) My DS 11 has always been better largely because he is twice exceptional (both gifted and dyslexic/dysgraphic.) He has an understanding of how learning can be hard, how to break something apart and learn it, basically to overcome obsticals. However, he hates tutoring peers for social reasons... Loves tutoring little kids.


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#17 of 25 Old 01-24-2012, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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LOL, I was just about to post but saw your edit!  Yeah, I hated academic tutoring in school too.  Actually I even hated group work because the other kids would slow me down!  And surprise surprise, DS had problems in groups, but they've already limited the number of group activities he has to do.


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#18 of 25 Old 01-25-2012, 03:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, I got the permission slips for testing, here's all they're going to do:

WISC-IV

Woodcock-Johnson III

Psychological processing checklist

Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals 4

Behavior Assessment System for Children

and if the BASC shows concerns, they'll do a Functional  Behavioral Assessment

 

Plus the teacher will do a present level of educational performance, and the social worker will do parent interviews.  The school psychologist and 3 other team members will observe him in the classroom.


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#19 of 25 Old 01-26-2012, 12:13 PM
 
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You could search by using terms from "Wrightslaw: From Emotions to Advocacy"'s Table of Contents. An e-book version from Amazon is about $8.00 and the print version is about $13. The book/site details a long list of tests; you may find some or all of the proposed tests in there.

 

Tests and Measurements for the Parent

 

 

 


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#20 of 25 Old 02-17-2012, 09:58 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Little nothing-update, our next meeting to go over all the test results is March 9th.  He had conferences last week and his teacher said that she doesn't think he's going to qualify for an IEP diagnosis just by what she's been seeing, but she's already talking with the coordinator about implementing other strategies (like being able to leave the classroom when he has a meltdown, stuff like that).  But he has an ADD diagnosis already so I'm not sure why that wouldn't be sufficient, but she may be wrong.  She said they did two in-class observation sessions and at one of them there was another adult presenter in the class doing a game with the kids so he was pretty involved with that, so they didn't see the gamut of his behaviors.  I'll bring that up, and his ADD diagnosis, if they decide he doesn't qualify. 


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#21 of 25 Old 02-17-2012, 11:17 AM
 
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Originally Posted by CallMeMommy View Post

Little nothing-update, our next meeting to go over all the test results is March 9th.  He had conferences last week and his teacher said that she doesn't think he's going to qualify for an IEP diagnosis just by what she's been seeing, but she's already talking with the coordinator about implementing other strategies (like being able to leave the classroom when he has a meltdown, stuff like that).  But he has an ADD diagnosis already so I'm not sure why that wouldn't be sufficient, but she may be wrong.  She said they did two in-class observation sessions and at one of them there was another adult presenter in the class doing a game with the kids so he was pretty involved with that, so they didn't see the gamut of his behaviors.  I'll bring that up, and his ADD diagnosis, if they decide he doesn't qualify. 

 

 

What you're hoping for is a designation of OHI (other health impaired), under IDEA.

 

The disabling
condition must be chronic or acute and must result in
limited strength, vitality, or alertness to the educational
environment. Whether a particular student is classified as
OHI will depend on the way the condition affects his or her
alertness or responsiveness to the educational environment.
 

 

 

I would give the evaluation team a form from his Dr. with his medical diagnosis now; waiting for a denial will extend an already drawn-out process, and since you aren't trying to keep this information from the school I don't see an advantage in waiting. I would also ask for their evaluation report that is to be filled out by his diagnosing Dr; they may not have intended on giving you one but I'd ask in an "oh, by the way" manner as if they had already said that they would.

 

One of my ds' observations was on a "special" day as well; the evaluator went back on a "normal" day.

 

Minnesota Special Education Law - Know Your Rights

 

Minnesota Special Education Law: Background and Step-By-Ste



You'll need to start preparing for that meeting; I'd make sure you ask to have the evaluation results a week before the meeting so that you have time to review them and any test scores (I'd also ask that they include Standard Scores and Percentile Rank. Have you read "From Emotions to Advocacy" yet?


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
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#22 of 25 Old 03-14-2012, 07:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
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He did qualify for the IEP using OHI!  He almost qualified just on behavior alone but one of the teachers who filled out the evaluation had only had him in class for a couple of weeks and he hadn't been acting out for her like he does the rest of his teachers.  If he didn't qualify with OHI I would have pushed for another observation.  I'm still waiting for the written report that I have to sign, so he's not getting any services yet, but it hasn't even been a week yet and they have 2 to get it done.  He's going to start having social skills work with the social worker and a small group of kids (which I am thrilled about, I think that will help a lot) and they're going to make some classroom accommodations like not having to participate in group work.  They're also going to see if he can join the gifted and talented program this year instead of waiting until 3rd grade when it "officially" starts.  The social worker wasn't sure if they'd agree, but she figured since he has an IEP they might as well try to use it to his best advantage :) 

 

I'm also learning to go to the social worker for questions since it seems like his teacher isn't quite as knowledgeable as I thought she was (see, I'm learning!).  Like his teacher has said more than once that when he says "I'm bored" he's just being defiant and rude (not her words, but that's the implication I get) because there are at least 2 other gifted kids in her class and they don't act like that, they know they can go get an iPad and do activities on it and such, but the social worker points out that with his ADHD he might not have the focus to move on to the next activity by himself.  They were more generalized with his goals so they'd have the ability to get creative with his assistance.  The social worker was also able to give me a couple of suggestions on how to deal with his behavior at home. 

 

After reading some other threads in the SN forum I have to say I'm really glad we ended up at this school, completely by chance.  It's just the way the district was broken up that he was assigned here, and it ended up having the best special ed program out of all the elementary schools.  I'm obviously not going to let my guard down, but so far they've been extremely accommodating.


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#23 of 25 Old 03-14-2012, 08:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CallMeMommy View Post
  They were more generalized with his goals so they'd have the ability to get creative with his assistance. 


I think they're feeding you a load of hooey; annual IEP goals must be objective and measurable. "More generalized" goals reduces your ability to measure the results and hold them accountable. Objective and measurable goals do not prevent them from "getting creative" with the process.

 

Quote:

Annual IEP goals must be objective and measurable

Why? IEP goals and objectives must be measurable so you can tell if the child is making progress! Measurable goals and objectives provide a way for you to evaluate whether the special education services that being provided are working (accountability!). 

 

Wrightslaw has a free e-newsletter and the topic this week is "Stress Less this IEP Season: How To Get an Appropriate Program"; you can sign up on their website with the link in the upper left corner.

 

Your Child's IEP: Practical & Legal Guidance for Parents

 

IDEA 2004: What You Need to Know About IEPs for Children with Behavior Problems

 

IEP and inclusion TIPS for Parents and Teachers

 

google search:  https://www.google.com/search?q=annual+IEP+goals+must+be+objective+and+measurable&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&aq=t&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:official&client=firefox-a


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
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#24 of 25 Old 03-14-2012, 11:30 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Okay, maybe "generalized" was a bad term.  They're measureable, they mentioned that amongst themselves a couple of times during the meeting (.i.e., "How are we going to measure that?"), but broad enough that they have some leeway.  I don't have my notes with me but IIRC one of them is be able to work in a group, or something with group work.  It's not specifying classroom groups or large groups like lunchtime (apparently a problem area).  I'll go over them again when I get the written plan before I sign anything.


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#25 of 25 Old 03-15-2012, 06:41 AM
 
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Just throwing this out there -- have you considered supportive psychotherapy?  When my dd was having meltdowns and fighting a lot (at home, not at school), since it is covered under insurance, I brought her in for a couple of sessions where she could talk about what was bothering her. We found a child psychologist that was able to help her express her frustrations w/her little sister and at school.  The effect, even of just a couple of sessions, was immense.  And my daughter has a very good life w/o obvious stressors -- just normal "little sister annoying" and some interpersonal conflicts at school.  Like you would say, what could possibly be wrong in her life that would cause her to stress out?  Well -- this therapy did help her find and express what was bothering her...

 

Just a suggestion in case there are issues that it would be best to have a neutral, trained adult to speak with .... that are contributing to his behavior.


Kids. I got two of 'em.
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