Colleges and Universities--where are the real good ones?! - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 56 Old 05-02-2012, 03:55 PM - Thread Starter
 
Bekka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I realize that many of year aren't possibly thinking along these lines, but I am looking to create a list of universities and colleges that create a learning environment that places "learning" and "expanding horizons".  My husband and I went to University of Southern California, and we really enjoyed our years there.  Really, really a lot.

 

It is a large university, with the feel of a small liberal arts college, at least for the undergrads in the College of LAS.  If anyone had a wonderful, enriching and mentoring environment at their college or university, please let us know.  We would love if our kids went there, but it's expensive.

 

Large, small, liberal arts, science-directed, anything.  If you had a great college time, put your school on the list.

Bekka is offline  
#2 of 56 Old 05-02-2012, 06:51 PM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Well... A lot is going to depend on the child. I can tell you that *neither* of mine have ended up where I may have expected or chosen (were it my choice). Nor were either too interested in the schools their Dad or I suggested they look at.

 

Not saying that you shouldn't give it thought, but be aware that it may not go the way you expect it to.

 

In any event. my son has been thrilled with the two years he has spent so far at Temple's Boyer School of Music & Dance, and I think my daughter made the right choice for her with Wells College. Two completely different environments,

mtiger is offline  
#3 of 56 Old 05-02-2012, 09:27 PM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,607
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 52 Post(s)

I found this book very interesting:

 

http://www.amazon.com/Colleges-That-Change-Lives-Schools/dp/0143037366/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336019183&sr=8-1
 


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
#4 of 56 Old 05-03-2012, 07:20 AM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

A good online resource is College Confidential.

mtiger is offline  
#5 of 56 Old 05-03-2012, 11:03 AM - Thread Starter
 
Bekka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I realize it is not my choice.  :)  I totally rocked my parents' world with where I went.  But I am living in the East now and I grew up ish and went to school in the West, so I am really needing some help to think about the "whole picture" of colleges/universities across the spectrum.  Will continue to look at College Confidential.
 

Bekka is offline  
#6 of 56 Old 05-03-2012, 11:57 AM
 
philomom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Location: Pacific Northwest
Posts: 9,429
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 3 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

I found this book very interesting:

http://www.amazon.com/Colleges-That-Change-Lives-Schools/dp/0143037366/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1336019183&sr=8-1


 

I recommend that book ,too. Except for Reed. Do not send your kid to Reed unless you want them to fully indoctrinated into the drug culture. Trust me.
philomom is offline  
#7 of 56 Old 05-03-2012, 02:24 PM
 
MidnightCommando's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Esto Perpetua
Posts: 1,713
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I went to SUNY Plattsburgh and I thought it was great. Small school, great engaging professors and a very liberal and diverse student body.  This college and visits to Vermont will bring out your inner hippy :)


\m/

MidnightCommando is offline  
#8 of 56 Old 05-04-2012, 03:10 PM
 
beanma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: with the dustbunnies & sugar beans
Posts: 8,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

Bekka, I see you're in Virginia. My niece is at UVA and reportedly loving it and it is much cheaper in-state. I have a good friend who went to Radford and I think she liked it, too. I also know many folks who had good experiences at Va Tech. 

 

I think a lot depends on your finances as well as the school culture. We paid for private school early on for our kids (now in public school) and they'll be going to a state school or earning a scholarship for college. We're tapped out. I want them to have a good experience, but no way will we do fat student loans for private schools. The debt is too burdensome and not worth it IMO. I know plenty of people who have great degrees from state schools and had wonderful experiences. If they can earn a scholarship to a private university I'm all for it, but some of them are so #$%&^ expensive now! $40,000 for 8 yrs (2 kids) is pretty steep for us. State tuition and expenses ($20,000) are bad enough.


Mamatreehugger.gif to two girl beans, Feb 2001hearts.gif and Nov 2003coolshine.gif . DH geek.gif, and two crazydog2.gifdog2.gif . Running on biodiesel since 2004!
 
"All you fascists are bound to lose" — Woody Guthrie
beanma is online now  
#9 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 03:29 AM
 
mariamadly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,492
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by philomom View Post


I recommend that book ,too. Except for Reed. Do not send your kid to Reed unless you want them to fully indoctrinated into the drug culture. Trust me.

 

Mother of a non-sub-using junior Reedie here.  He has experienced no "indoctrination" in anything but intellectual rigor and genuine concern for his overall well-being from members throughout the community.

 

That's what I hear from him, anyway.  I'm inclined to believe him due to a combination of medical issues and his history of being honest and precise regarding very difficult and unpleasant things about himself, us, and the world and people around him.  Ironically, he talked about feeling isolated due to not using drugs (alcohol) at another campus he visited -- more socially conventional with a more mainstream attitude about AOD (alcohol and other drugs) and many other things.  The only climate aspect he raised about making friends at Reed is one he says he shares with fellow students:  their work is so absorbing that it can be hard getting time to meet new people.

 

Reed is only right for your child if it's right for your child.  Visit first, decide with your eyes open.  And examine any school beyond judgmental, sweeping, and facile overviews.

 

Trust your child.


Empty-nesting SAHM to DS1 (1989), DS2 (1992), an underachieving Bernese Mountain Dog (2006-2014), and an overachieving mother (1930).  Married to DH since 1986.
mariamadly is online now  
#10 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 07:28 AM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have to say that the comment about Reed earlier in the thread didn't sit right with me. Realistically speaking? Regardless of WHAT college/university someone attends, there is going to be some level of drug use. And ezch student is responsible for their choice in that regard. Sure, some schools are bigger party schools than others, but ALL of them have students who choose not to partake.

 

As PP stated - if a school is right for your kid? It's right for your kid.

 

Also... with regard to state schools. My son attends a state school. Just not in our state. He was accepted to our state school, full ride, but it would not have been the right place for him. Not in any way, shape or form. It would have been the wrong place for my youngest, as well.

 

Funnily enough, I had people warn me that our state school is a HUGE party school, with a HUGE drug culture. That had nothing to do with the choices my kids made. It was still the wrong school, regardless.

mtiger is offline  
#11 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 07:43 AM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I have to say that the comment about Reed earlier in the thread didn't sit right with me. Realistically speaking? Regardless of WHAT college/university someone attends, there is going to be some level of drug use. And ezch student is responsible for their choice in that regard. Sure, some schools are bigger party schools than others, but ALL of them have students who choose not to partake.

 

As PP stated - if a school is right for your kid? It's right for your kid.

 

Also... with regard to state schools. My son attends a state school. Just not in our state. He was accepted to our state school, full ride, but it would not have been the right place for him. Not in any way, shape or form. It would have been the wrong place for my youngest, as well.

 

Funnily enough, I had people warn me that our state school is a HUGE party school, with a HUGE drug culture. That had nothing to do with the choices my kids made. It was still the wrong school, regardless.

mtiger is offline  
#12 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 08:11 AM
 
beanma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: with the dustbunnies & sugar beans
Posts: 8,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

Regarding state schools, we have 16 state universities. I think our kids can find a decent fit at one of them or earn a scholarship elsewhere. I'm not willing to burden them or us with debt for the "perfect fit" if it's $160,000 for 4 years vs finding a "good fit" for $22,000. I'd rather help them buy a $160,000 house when they get out. I don't think the particular college is _that_ important. I mean, it does have to have the area of study they're interested in, but I know plenty of folks who have excelled in their careers and had a great college experience and didn't go to Harvard. 


Mamatreehugger.gif to two girl beans, Feb 2001hearts.gif and Nov 2003coolshine.gif . DH geek.gif, and two crazydog2.gifdog2.gif . Running on biodiesel since 2004!
 
"All you fascists are bound to lose" — Woody Guthrie
beanma is online now  
#13 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 08:32 AM
 
Radicalmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: Portland, Maine
Posts: 6
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I went to Unversity of Southern Maine and was VERY happy with it. :)

 

Some of my friends who wenty from out of state said it offered the best financial aid package of their choices, also.

 

I liked the Portland campus better then the Gorham campus. Also, at the time the dorms were downtown on Congress st and really economical. Now they have some called Bayside village in Portland that are a lot more expensive. Gorham has some more housing out there, though. It may actually be cheaper & more convienient to find an apartment w/roommates in Portland.

 

Anyway, it's a fairly small campus, great little city, public transportation, a shuttle between the 2 campus', etc.

Radicalmom is offline  
#14 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 03:08 PM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by beanma View Post

Regarding state schools, we have 16 state universities. I think our kids can find a decent fit at one of them or earn a scholarship elsewhere. I'm not willing to burden them or us with debt for the "perfect fit" if it's $160,000 for 4 years vs finding a "good fit" for $22,000. I'd rather help them buy a $160,000 house when they get out. I don't think the particular college is _that_ important. I mean, it does have to have the area of study they're interested in, but I know plenty of folks who have excelled in their careers and had a great college experience and didn't go to Harvard. 

 

Well... while we have numerous state colleges, we only have the one state university. Which was also the only one offering the area of study #1 was looking at. And it still would have been a terrible fit for him. However, NOT going there does NOT mean a tuition bill of $40k/year. Heck it doesn't mean a bill of $22k, either, necessarily. There is needs- and academic-based aid. Like I said, my oldest is going to a state school in a different state, and I don't pay anywhere near $22k. My youngest will be going to a private school, and I'm not paying anywhere near $22k there, either. It's one reason why I continually reminded them that their achievements in HS were going to make a difference. And it has.

 

I will disagree that the particular school makes no difference. I think it can make a world of difference.

lp

mtiger is offline  
#15 of 56 Old 05-06-2012, 06:53 PM
 
beanma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: with the dustbunnies & sugar beans
Posts: 8,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

Well, you will note that I did say "earn a scholarship elsewhere". I'm all for them going someplace great that they can help pay for by having good grades, but we're unlikely to qualify for much financial aid, yet aren't rich enough to shell out for Duke or Stanford or Reed which is $55,920 per year according to their website. We do have 16 universities (not colleges, and all but 3 with graduate programs, some with medical schools, law schools, etc) in our state, North Carolina. I don't think a degree from UNC-Chapel Hill (my alma mater) is going to be a big disadvantage in any field. It may not hold quite the cachet that a degree from Harvard or MIT does, but there are plenty of professionals at the top of their field with a degree from UNC. If UNC-CH isn't a good fit there are 15 other universities in the state system and most of them have fine degree programs, too, in different areas. Some of them are big like UNC-CH and NC State and some are small like UNC-Asheville and Western Carolina. I am all for our girls doing well and earning a scholarship to the school of their choice, but we just can't shell out $56 thou a year ($224,000 for 4 yrs) for Reed. I want them to go to a school where they're happy, and I am all about a good fit, but it doesn't have to be the absolute perfect fit any more than I have to be the absolute perfect mom. It's just got to be good enough for them to be happy and study what interests them.


Mamatreehugger.gif to two girl beans, Feb 2001hearts.gif and Nov 2003coolshine.gif . DH geek.gif, and two crazydog2.gifdog2.gif . Running on biodiesel since 2004!
 
"All you fascists are bound to lose" — Woody Guthrie
beanma is online now  
#16 of 56 Old 05-07-2012, 03:15 PM - Thread Starter
 
Bekka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Good discussion.  In the circles I move in, many of my friends either attended one of a couple church-sponsored schools or have been homeschooled/have homeschooled and they or their children have followed alternative paths to education (College Plus).  I am very interested in many paths to education, but my oldest daughter is a knowledge and information sponge, and she is really the type to benefit from a liberal arts AND sciences-type education that delves into why and how people are the way they are, etc. and would like a broader picture than these few schools.

Bekka is offline  
#17 of 56 Old 05-07-2012, 05:13 PM
 
mariamadly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,492
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)

This book http://www.amazon.com/Cool-Colleges-Hyper-Intelligent-Self-Directed-Different/dp/1580088392 also has some ideas.  Related site http://www.donaldasher.com/ccl.php


Empty-nesting SAHM to DS1 (1989), DS2 (1992), an underachieving Bernese Mountain Dog (2006-2014), and an overachieving mother (1930).  Married to DH since 1986.
mariamadly is online now  
#18 of 56 Old 05-07-2012, 05:25 PM
 
mariamadly's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 1,492
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 60 Post(s)

One thing you'll find is the information overload is mind-numbing.  Especially by the time DS2 applied last year, there was almost too large a field to choose from.  So, while the decision about where to apply was completely his, he gave me some show-stopper guidelines with which I narrowed down a list of schools for him to use as a starting point.  His parameters were size, geography, majors offered, academic reputation, religious affiliation, probably a couple of others.  He had a much easier time weeding through two single-spaced sheets than the entire Fiske Guide.

 

So I guess I wanted to chime in with how we balanced administrative support and still had our son lead the process.


Empty-nesting SAHM to DS1 (1989), DS2 (1992), an underachieving Bernese Mountain Dog (2006-2014), and an overachieving mother (1930).  Married to DH since 1986.
mariamadly is online now  
#19 of 56 Old 05-07-2012, 06:59 PM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MariaMadly View Post

One thing you'll find is the information overload is mind-numbing.  Especially by the time DS2 applied last year, there was almost too large a field to choose from.  So, while the decision about where to apply was completely his, he gave me some show-stopper guidelines with which I narrowed down a list of schools for him to use as a starting point.  His parameters were size, geography, majors offered, academic reputation, religious affiliation, probably a couple of others.  He had a much easier time weeding through two single-spaced sheets than the entire Fiske Guide.

 

So I guess I wanted to chime in with how we balanced administrative support and still had our son lead the process.

 

That's very useful help, IMO.

mtiger is offline  
#20 of 56 Old 05-09-2012, 09:47 AM
 
Emmeline II's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 8,817
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MidnightCommando View Post

I went to SUNY Plattsburgh and I thought it was great. Small school, great engaging professors and a very liberal and diverse student body.  This college and visits to Vermont will bring out your inner hippy :)

 

wave.gif I graduated from SUNY Binghamton; I really enjoyed my time there.

 

Quote:

Binghamton University offers the attention of a small college with the choices and opportunities of a research university.

http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/suny-binghamton-2836

 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binghamton_University


"It should be a rule in all prophylactic work that no harm should ever be unnecessarily inflicted on a healthy person (Sir Graham Wilson, The Hazards of Immunization, 1967)."
Emmeline II is offline  
#21 of 56 Old 05-09-2012, 11:06 AM
 
JudiAU's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Where creepy facebook-featured threads can't find me
Posts: 3,610
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)

Ha. I went to USC undergrad and hated it. I refuse to receive any communciation from the school. Big school. Not personalized. Way too much emphasis on "professional" programs rather than liberal arts education. Strong focus on anything but learning.

 

I did enjoy my graduate experience at the University of Ilinois, U-C. It has a great campus and I think it would be a great place to be an undergraduate.

 

Most of our friends went to Harvard or other Ivy League schools. And everything single one of them raves about the education they received, the attention, the academics, and the friends they made. (eyeroll) As if they didn't already have that reputation...

JudiAU is offline  
#22 of 56 Old 05-09-2012, 02:39 PM - Thread Starter
 
Bekka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I know that some of my friends did NOT love 'SC.  Your experience is not the same as either mine or my husband's.  It could have something to do with the programs we were in, etc.  I know that some of my siblings would NOT have benefited from USC as well.  I'm sorry that you felt your experience was impersonal and you choose not to have contact with USC.

 

I think it goes to show that not all unis/colleges are right for everyone.  Hence my choice to start researching when my oldest is in 8th grade.  :)

Bekka is offline  
#23 of 56 Old 05-09-2012, 03:14 PM
 
beanma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: with the dustbunnies & sugar beans
Posts: 8,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

Bekka, what are your child's interests? That might help us make some good recommendations.


Mamatreehugger.gif to two girl beans, Feb 2001hearts.gif and Nov 2003coolshine.gif . DH geek.gif, and two crazydog2.gifdog2.gif . Running on biodiesel since 2004!
 
"All you fascists are bound to lose" — Woody Guthrie
beanma is online now  
#24 of 56 Old 05-10-2012, 07:00 AM
 
mtiger's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 2,377
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I did some graduate work at SC, and hated it, to be honest. I did my undergrad at Columbia Engineering. Yes, it is a good school. I value the education I got there, because it was a very well-rounded education, with it's core curriculum. Even as an Engineer, I had to take a hefty course-load of humanities/liberal arts courses. And I think that's important in terms of becoming educated.

 

As for what kind of school it was? Eh. I have little to no contact with anyone from there. My oldest applied, for spits and giggles. I'll admit to being shocked that he wasn't admitted as he was a much stronger candidate than I was. But he wouldn't have gone there anyway, so it was a moot point.

 

I do think it's good that you're starting to explore possible options. Also, remember... his interests in 8th grade may chage dramatically over the next few years. In 8th grade, my son was going to be a chef. By 9th, he was going to be an engineer. In 10th, he started giving serious thought to music. And in 11thm he made the decision to focus on music composition and hasn't looked back since.

 

Or they may not. My daughter has known she wanted to be  involved in the life sciences since she was a tyke. And that hasn't changed a bit.

mtiger is offline  
#25 of 56 Old 05-10-2012, 07:22 AM
Dar
 
Dar's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2002
Location: St. Louis, MO
Posts: 11,438
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I agree with people who are saying that the important thing is to find the school that fits the person. We started out with a list of things Rain really wanted in a college (in an urban setting, near a coast, strong Russian program, strong study abroad program, maybe others) and narrowed down the list from there, and then just kept sorting through information. She got tons of college mail for years. She wound up at a school that fits her needs and has lots of opportunities for her.

I'm in grad school at a highly selective university (that has none of the things Rain wanted, unfortunately, except the urban location) and as an adjunct faculty member and teaching assistant I've spent a lot of time talking with undergrads. I love my school, and it's been a great fit for me, and it's a great fit for a lot of the students - but not all of them. It's a high-pressure environment - I just got an email last night from a student who would up with an A- in my class last semester and is distraught - and our med school is one of the top 3 in the country so a lot of undergrads are pre-med and there's a heavy focus on the hard sciences. My department is very together and friendly and nurturing, but not all departments are.It just really, really depends...

 
fambedsingle1.gifSingle mom to Rain (1/93) , grad student, and world traveler earth.gif


  

Dar is offline  
#26 of 56 Old 05-10-2012, 05:17 PM - Thread Starter
 
Bekka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

She is interested in physical sciences, probably major in physics, although she's saying chemistry is really interesting too.

She's a serious violinist, but probably doesn't want to pursue it as a career--instead she'd like to minor or major as a liberal arts music major/minor.

She LOVES Latin and Classics studies, and I could see her with a triple major, or 2 majors/1 minor, or 1 major/2 minors.  We'll see what bubbles up as her biggest love, or maybe something else entirely.

 

I asked if there were a school with a physics major, and violin performance minor, and Latin/Classics minor, how would that sound; she thought it sounded GREAT.  She also has diverse interests in and around social studies/anthropology, Scottish fiddling, and music composition.  This is why I'm exploring the strong liberal arts component--she has so many diverse interests that she will probably need/want an honors program of some kind with emphasis on academic exploration and discussion--deep and wide over diverse topics around the world.

Bekka is offline  
#27 of 56 Old 05-10-2012, 06:51 PM
 
beanma's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: with the dustbunnies & sugar beans
Posts: 8,159
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)

That sounds like Virginia Tech could be a good fit to me. 

 

http://www.music.vt.edu/

 

http://www.phys.vt.edu/

 

http://www.fll.vt.edu/Classics/classicalstudiesmajor.html

 

Beautiful campus and you have the whole bluegrass thing going on too so plenty of fiddling around, if not necessarily Scottish (but I bet there's some of that, too). http://www.vt.edu/about/snapshots.html

 

But I think you could find many schools, especially larger schools, with all her interests covered. I would think USC would probably have those majors/minors, too. At UNC (my alma mater) you can have an "interdisciplinary studies" major which basically allows you to build your own major if there's not a degree program you're interested in. That's not a new idea — been around a long, long time, so I would imagine it's available (maybe not under that exact phrase) at many other unis, too. 


Mamatreehugger.gif to two girl beans, Feb 2001hearts.gif and Nov 2003coolshine.gif . DH geek.gif, and two crazydog2.gifdog2.gif . Running on biodiesel since 2004!
 
"All you fascists are bound to lose" — Woody Guthrie
beanma is online now  
#28 of 56 Old 05-11-2012, 11:12 AM
 
flightgoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 345
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Lawrence University, Appleton, WI. Small, liberal arts. Very student aid friendly. Many cross-or multi-diciplinary options/opportunities, double-degree opportunities, many independant study/research opportunities. Great study abroad options. Best 4 yrs ever.

flightgoddess is offline  
#29 of 56 Old 05-11-2012, 12:40 PM - Thread Starter
 
Bekka's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: Virginia
Posts: 2,233
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Thanks!  Lawrence University has come up on my radar a couple of rounds but I had no opinions of it b/c I knew no one who went there.  It sounds great, including a music program.

Bekka is offline  
#30 of 56 Old 05-11-2012, 05:24 PM
 
zinemama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2002
Location: from the fire roads to the interstate
Posts: 6,568
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Earlham College. A small, liberal arts, Quaker school in Indiana. I got a stellar education there, from teachers who put teaching first.
zinemama is offline  
Reply

Tags
School

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off