Is is appropriate to write a letter to the school regarding their discipline policy? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 04:05 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My daughter is a 1st grader at a local public school. I hate it there, we are going on day 4. So far, it has been ALL rules and regulations, and they are very punitive. They give detention to 1st graders for being late and for behaivor. They take away recess for daily classroom 'misbehavior'. They will not allow you to bring anything your child might have forgotten because they want your child to learn from their mistakes.

I feel like everything in this school is punishment and behavior based. I have yet to read how they will foster a love of learning or really anything about education or learning itself. My husband and I are both in agreement that this is not what we want for our daughter, this is so the opposite of our life and parenting philosophy.

 

The school wanted us to sign something basically saying we received the rules and agree to them, but I won't sign it, no way am I saying its ok to give my 6 year old detention for being late, something she has absolutely no control over. We want to send a letter to the teacher and/or principal discussing how the entire philosophy feels to us, how we dislike the major focus on punishment and how we think it is harmful to children (ours in particular).


I am not sure what will change if anything, but I almost feel like remaining silent is consenting. has anyone experienced this before? How do you handle it? How would you word a letter, and what would you expect as an outcome?
Thank you!


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#2 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 04:33 PM
 
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Before you start writing letters have you gone in to talk to the teacher?     How much misbehaviour is needed before they take recess away.  

 

The first bit of school does have quite a bit of rules & regulations because they need to set their boundries for what is & isn't acceptable at the beginning of the year.  I hardly doubt all they have done in 4 days is go over rules, pretty sure they've done other things too.

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#3 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 07:07 PM
 
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I'm not sure what I would do if I HAD to send my child to a school like that. We have a magnet school in our district that sounds very similar (except there is also the brick of shame, so everyone knows you were late or forgot something). So I don't send my kids there. I send my you best to the complete opposite - I actually forgot to send him the first day since his brother and sister started different days ;-).
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#4 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 07:41 PM
 
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I urge you to talk to the teacher before you decide the school is your enemy.  They can't function without rules and discipline and those rules need to be the same for everyone.  They can't possibly discipline every single child in the method each parent would prefer, it would be chaos.
 

See how it plays out before you decide to ask them to change the whole disciplinary system.  You haven't seen it in action yet. 

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#5 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 08:27 PM
 
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I think a letter is appropriate. My daughter went to 4th and 5th grades in a school I really did not like - very rules based, rigid, and punitive. Sounds a lot like the one you're describing. We've had experiences with several public schools, and while they do all require kids to conform to their structure, the are definitely not all so harsh about it. A letter would be a great way to give them feedback on how heavy handed their approach appears to some new parents. You have other choices, after all, and they would be wise to try not to alienate their students' families.

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#6 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 08:27 PM
 
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My kids go to an uber mellow school with no detention, and I really wish kids did get detention for being late. The amount of interruption caused by families who continually arrive at school up to 30 minutes is ridiculous.

 

I totally understand why schools have strict rules about this. You waste all the other children's time and cause the class to loose focus when you are late. In a culture where being punctual isn't a priority, the way some families behave is pretty unbelievable.

 

As far a parent bringing in forgotten items, it, too, is a major interruption that causes the class to loose focus. (or causes extra work while the office admin delivers the needed items).

 

What we do is have a "launch pad" where we put everything needed for the next day. When my kids go to bed at night, all books, homework, permission slips, etc are together and then they just pick them up as they walk out the door.

 

At the beginning of the years, the rules are laid down so that every one is clear. I agree with meeting with the teacher before writing letters. 

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#7 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 09:12 PM
 
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In elementary school, its often the parents' fault a child is late. I don't think a 6 year old is responsible for getting to their destination on time. It would be cruel to punish a 6 year old because their parent over slept the alarm clock. 


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#8 of 48 Old 08-25-2012, 09:54 PM
 
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I think you should schedule a meeting to ask questions about the policies and voice your concern first. It sounds like a thorough discipline plan that includes possible consequencrs for ongoing behavior problems and it is typical to get a letter addressing the full plan from day one. That doesn't mean they start at that from day one and they probably allow excused lateness when a parent walks in and gives the reason for being late.

If it turns out that your interpretation is accurate I would write a letter and CC a copy to the principals supervisor stating your concerns about the focus on harsh punishments for little things rather than a problem solving approach with a continuum of consequences that fit with the behavior as well. I am betting that it will not need to get to that level though.
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#9 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 05:29 AM
 
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While it is often the parents' fault when a child is late, it is also often the child's dawdling that results in tardiness. Holding the child responsible cuts down on the latter, and may result in the child bugging the parent enough to make the effort to be on time. OP - has your child been late this first week of school? If so - why? If not - do you see it being an issue?

 

I agree that you need to find out just what/how much misbehavior results in losing recess. Fact is, 20 kids running amuck in class isn't reasonable, so they do need to restrict that kind of behavior.

 

As for not being allowed to bring things teh child forgot? I can tell you that both of mine knew from the first day - if they forgot it? They had to live without it. Didn't matter if they forgot something at home they needed at school, or something at school they needed at home. They would have to deal with it as I was not going to go back for it or deliver it to them. I don't think they forgot something more than once.

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#10 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 06:56 AM - Thread Starter
 
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wow... lots of mixed feelings on this one.

 

My daughter has not been late this first week, but I myself am not a terribly punctual person so I can see it being a potential issue in the future. I have two other children, one a high needs toddler and the other an older child with special needs that gets on the school bus 10 minutes before we need to leave to get middle daughter to school on time. If her bus is late, middle dd will be late. It is absolutely not her fault, and I would not consent to her being punished for it. I also believe it is too much responsibility for a 6 or 7 year old to have to manage getting to school on time. The policy is after 5 times being late the result would be detention.

 

Recess is taken away after a verbal warning about behavior if the behavior continues. I do not agree with taking away recess for any reason, I feel that a child needs a physical outlet for their energy, even a child who misbehaves. My daughter is very sweet and well intentioned, but also a bit forgetful. If she leaves her lunch on the table or her glasses in her room, yes, I am going to bring them to her. I am not going to expect her to go without or go hungry for the day because of an honest mistake. If I forget something essential to my day I go back for it or go buy a replacement. Why shouldn't my child have the same opportunity?


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#11 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 07:27 AM
 
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For some reason, it didn't take my first edit and instead wrote a separate post. Response below.


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#12 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 07:57 AM
 
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Oh gosh, just saw your update so changing response. FIVE tardies before getting detention is more than reasonable! Even then, I suspect if you lay out the issues with a special needs child, they will be understanding. Being late is disruptive to the class and mortifying for the child. I understand you have a lot on your plate but as a kid who was habitually late because of my parents I plead with you to get her there on time as much as possible.

 

How do you expect your child to learn to remember her things if you aren't going to let her deal with the natural consequences of her actions? She's 6 and the stakes are still very low. I tell you, the parents I knew running home to get forgotten items in elementary are STILL doing it in high school. Their kids didn't learn their lesson and now the stakes are high and it's easy to rationalize running home to avoid dropped grades and exclusion from college. THIS is when they learn these things... right now when all it means is they had to wait in line for plain peanut butter and crackers with white milk from the lunch room (what our school gave kids who forgot their lunch,) or they have to miss a little game day one Friday because they forgot their work. These little lessons help.

 

Getting a warning for misbehavior before missing recess is adequate. I don't personally agree with the missing recess part but I've also been shocked by how unruly and disrespectful some kids can be even in 1st grade! Teachers need some discipline options and you know, missing recess is a powerful deterrent for some of your tougher cases. Personally, my kids LOVED the strict teachers because they fostered a safe and positive learning environment unlike some of the "nice" teachers for whom there were more bully issues, more disruption, slower academic pace, ect. 

 

You are 4 days into the school year. Have you actually seen the teacher in action? Do you have an idea of how she/he, in particular, handles these situations or are you just going strictly off the contract? I haven't known any teacher which took these contracts so black and white. They are usually rational people who know what they are ALLOWED to do but will play it all by ear. It's unlikely they will actually take recess away after 1 warning in the beginning. However, if they have a child who is especially unruly and disrespectful, they CAN give a penalty after 1 warning and that may be needed in that case. 

 

Give it more time, find out how the rules are actually handled by the individual teacher, talk to the teacher if there is an issue for your child, if you still have a problem, talk to the principal in person.


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#13 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 09:53 AM
 
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I am sure if you explain the situation with your older dd's bus time to your dd's teacher and principal they will be understanding even if their policy is typically as strict as you believe it to be. Tardiness at my dd's school is excused if a parent gives a reason for it. Excessive tardiness is tracked though and can be used to bring parents into court but that is rare. As for the not bringing forgotten things in, that seems reasonable to me. There is no way I am going to take of from work to drop a forgotten item off at school, it wouldn't be feasible and it would be reflected in my performance review.

Instead I make sure my dd has her things in her backpack the night before and has her backpack with her before we leave the house. When I packed her lunches they went on top of my purse or in her backpack so they were never forgotten. I see it as my job to help her remember things she would otherwise forget. She has never attended a school where children would go hungry if they didn't bring lunch, public school extends a ten dollar credit and her charter school and summer daycare had some extra food available.

The recess situation is frustrating but I have found that it tends to never ne the whole recess unless the child is very disruptive and teachers tend to try new strategies if it isn't effective. It is typically a last resort even if teachers ate allowed to make it a first resort.
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#14 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 06:32 PM
 
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Originally Posted by whatsnextmom View Post

 

You are 4 days into the school year. Have you actually seen the teacher in action? Do you have an idea of how she/he, in particular, handles these situations or are you just going strictly off the contract? I haven't known any teacher which took these contracts so black and white. They are usually rational people who know what they are ALLOWED to do but will play it all by ear. It's unlikely they will actually take recess away after 1 warning in the beginning. However, if they have a child who is especially unruly and disrespectful, they CAN give a penalty after 1 warning and that may be needed in that case. 

 

Give it more time, find out how the rules are actually handled by the individual teacher, talk to the teacher if there is an issue for your child, if you still have a problem, talk to the principal in person.

 

This! Different teachers handle classroom behavior very differently even at the same school and operating under the same overall policy. Just wait and see how it goes for your child. If you're not in agreement with the policy you might want to just sign that you read it and cross out the "agree" part. Also, you might try to establish a rapport with the teacher first and see what her personal philosophy is. If you have some resources you can offer her that might work, but it's best to approach it from a "working with" perspective rather than an antagonistic, adversarial standpoint. 


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#15 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 08:14 PM
 
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I had a post here but I've deleted it because it wasn't supportive, and this is support board. This is obviously a very big and stressful change for Sesa70.

 

It's been a long time since I had a 6 year old, and my kids have learned to take their things to school and get their on time. At one time, that did seem really overwhelming to me. I was also nervous the first time I turned my kids over to school for the day, and concerned about how they would be treated.

 

I didn't use to be that organized. bag.gif

 

But now we are on the other side. The kids rise to the expectations and grow in ways we think they aren't ready for. We've had FABULOUS teachers who cared about the kids and were fair and reasonable. I've figured out to organize things to make it all flow semi-smoothly.

 

Sesa70, I hope your DD (and your whole family) have a better second week of school than the first week, and that you all are able to move through this transitional period easily. I hope as you get to know the teacher, and not just the official school policies, that you feel great about your DD's experiences.

 

Peace


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#16 of 48 Old 08-26-2012, 09:22 PM
 
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wow... lots of mixed feelings on this one.

My daughter has not been late this first week, but I myself am not a terribly punctual person so I can see it being a potential issue in the future. I have two other children, one a high needs toddler and the other an older child with special needs that gets on the school bus 10 minutes before we need to leave to get middle daughter to school on time. If her bus is late, middle dd will be late. It is absolutely not her fault, and I would not consent to her being punished for it. I also believe it is too much responsibility for a 6 or 7 year old to have to manage getting to school on time. The policy is after 5 times being late the result would be detention.

Recess is taken away after a verbal warning about behavior if the behavior continues. I do not agree with taking away recess for any reason, I feel that a child needs a physical outlet for their energy, even a child who misbehaves. My daughter is very sweet and well intentioned, but also a bit forgetful. If she leaves her lunch on the table or her glasses in her room, yes, I am going to bring them to her. I am not going to expect her to go without or go hungry for the day because of an honest mistake. If I forget something essential to my day I go back for it or go buy a replacement. Why shouldn't my child have the same opportunity?

I agree- the rules are, IMO, unreasonably strict and militant for elementary school. I have occasionally brought forgotten items to my daughter's middle school... unless it happens frequently, it just isn't that disruptive. Why couldn't you leave the item in the front office to be retrieved or delivered during a transition? That plus the tardy policy- sounds like they're trying to train parents as much as children, and it's the child who pays the price for lapses. Detention in elementary school? Really?? Come on. I wouldn't be comfortable with my kids in such a rigid environment, either.

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#17 of 48 Old 08-27-2012, 07:32 AM
 
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I would definitely discuss the morning schedule issue with the principal and the teacher. Also, consider talking with your transportation department about the bus schedule for your SN child - they can sometimes tweak the p/u time, which would give you soe extra wiggle room.

 

As for delivering forgotten items... OP would need to pack up a high needs toddler - which is not always an easy thing. I know, in my case, I worked over an hour away from home. So... what was left at home? Stayed at home. Backpacks were packed and left by the front door the night before. I asked them if they had x, y, z... The first few weeks, I checked their bags. And then I left it at asking them if they had the needed items.

 

Forgotten lunches? I don't know of a school who would allow a child to go hungry. Many will credit the child's account up to a certain amount so they can get whatever the hot lunch is. Others will provide a cold sandwich and milk.

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#18 of 48 Old 08-27-2012, 09:32 AM
 
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It sounds like a thorough discipline plan that includes possible consequencrs for ongoing behavior problems and it is typical to get a letter addressing the full plan from day one. That doesn't mean they start at that from day one and they probably allow excused lateness when a parent walks in and gives the reason for being late.
 

 

 

Agree. The rules do seem strict but I agree with others that you should speak to the teacher and find out how s/he implements them. Sometimes schools have fairly rigid written policies to fall back on when they are dealing with unrepentant repeat offenders who break those rules without good reason. They set out those rules at the start of the school year to avoid later arguments that students/parents didn't know about potential consequences and so they shouldn't be held to them. 

 

Late arriving students are disruptive to the teacher, who has just managed to get 2 dozen classmates settled down to work for the day, and a distraction to those 2 dozen. It also isn't fair for your DD to have to walk into class late. I understand the stress of dealing with other children in the morning and being at the mercy of a bus schedule. Is it possible for another parent to take your middle daughter to school, or perhaps an older student can walk her to school? 

 

Aside from speaking to the teacher (and possibly the principal) and possibly writing a letter, consider attending the school's parent council/association meetings. If you find that the rules are rigid and the school is overly punitive, then get the discipline policy on the agenda and voice your concerns to a group who may be able to help you change things. But don't be surprised if the other parents approve of the discipline policy and support the school. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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#19 of 48 Old 08-28-2012, 04:43 PM
 
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Most schools don't receive any state funding at all if I child misses the attendance period. Tardies are a significant revenue drain. Schools cannot punish the parents so they have to address it with students.

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#20 of 48 Old 08-28-2012, 06:37 PM
 
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I do think detention in elementary school is extra harsh. I haven't heard of that before. We do have the 3 unexcused tardies = 1 absence rule. I think the missing recess, etc, is pretty typical. Our school also has no issue with parents bringing forgotten items to the front office. I did that a few times last year with forgotten water bottles (mainly because the kids were upset), but they don't always get picked up/taken to the class.

 

The main thing, though, is how the teacher enforces all of this. Some teachers can have very punitive classroom behavior management strategies and some can operate more from a standpoint of reinforcing positive behavior. Check with the teacher first and see how she/he handles things. Then you'll probably get farther if you get involved in the PTA or the SIT (School Improvement Team, or equivalent).


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#21 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 09:35 AM
 
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I do think detention in elementary school is extra harsh. I haven't heard of that before.

 

I think I'd want to know what they qualify as "detention" as I've yet to see it used in the way it was used when I was growing up. Growing up, if you got a detention, a note went home to your parents to sign and you stayed after school. None of that in the schools we've been involved with. Elementary school would retain kids during recess for 5 minutes and call it "detention." Middle school held their detentions at lunch. The kids would just eat in a teacher's room with supervision. The high school had Saturday school and excessive tardies would go there (and the school could use it as an attendance recovery day to make up the lost revenue of absent/tardy kids.) I believe this is largely due to the high quantity of working families, aftercare consideration and bussing issues. I'd actually be surprised if this school used a traditional detention format. Worth asking about before getting too upset about it.


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#22 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 09:39 AM
 
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My daughter is a 1st grader at a local public school. I hate it there, we are going on day 4. So far, it has been ALL rules and regulations, and they are very punitive. 

So, how's it going now, sensa70? Are things getting better?  I have a lot of thoughts on what you posted.

 

One, I do tend to agree with you about children being punished (or rewarded) for things that their parents do or don't do. It really doesn't seem appropriate to me. That said, I really do agree with a PP on you making a huge effort on getting your DC on time to school. It's not good for the school or for you DC to be late. Nevertheless, the school should address parents in regards to lateness. DC went to a school once where the teacher publicly rewarded students if their parent paid PTO dues. My child did not get a reward (candy) even thought I had paid my dues. I went to speak to her about it and she apologized and gave my kid a lolly pop. OMG -- that was SO, so not why I had bothered to speak with her. So much wrong with all of that. I ended up pulling DC out of that school because week after week was stuff like this and I could tell it was DEEPLY ingrained in the school culture.  

 

Recess/detention and punitive discipline -- urgh! I agree with you. It's such a sad state that our schools do this still. Not only for the kids being punished, it isn't a good message for the kids behaving  either. And the worst thing is that it highlights the "trouble makers", making a change in behavior even harder to accomplish for those kids who struggle. And...show me a school where this type of discipline is frequent in K and then gradually declines in necessity by the later years and I'll give some credit to this actually working - but I have yet to see one!  

 

Ok, all of that said -- I also totally agree with the PPs that recommend talking to your teacher and administration. Go into it with an attitude of "Tell me more about this". You never know -- you may get a very acceptable explanation. Good luck and let us know how it goes...


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#23 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 09:46 AM
 
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The school wanted us to sign something basically saying we received the rules and agree to them, but I won't sign it, no way am I saying its ok to give my 6 year old detention for being late, something she has absolutely no control over.

You have control over whether your daughter gets to school on time. It is your fault if she is tardy, and your fault if she is punished for it.

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#24 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 10:25 AM
 
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You have control over whether your daughter gets to school on time. It is your fault if she is tardy, and your fault if she is punished for it.

Unless her other child's bus is late, as she stated above in the thread there's only a 10-minute window between that bus and drop-off. 


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#25 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 10:47 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AmandaT View Post

Unless her other child's bus is late, as she stated above in the thread there's only a 10-minute window between that bus and drop-off. 

If the bus is late then all the kids on the bus will also be late, so the teacher will be aware of the issue and no doubt will excuse the tardiness. I doubt very much that this is about the teacher trying to "catch out" children being tardy when the bus is late.

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#26 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 11:08 AM
 
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I read it as a 10 minute window between the middle child's bus and when they have to LEAVE to drop off the younger child.

 

Which really should be no problem - a bus may be a few minutes late sometimes but if it's regularly more than 10 minutes late, that is a serious issue that needs to be taken up separately with the school/bus charter.

 

I really don't see why a 10 minute window wouldn't be more than enough - unless the OP is not planning the morning so everything is ready by the time the middle child's bus comes. If she is planning it so the bus comes and then they rush back and finish getting ready for the youngest child, that could be a problem - but it's a problem of her making and in her control, not something that she needs to involve the elementary school in.

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#27 of 48 Old 08-29-2012, 11:12 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by choli View Post

If the bus is late then all the kids on the bus will also be late, so the teacher will be aware of the issue and no doubt will excuse the tardiness. I doubt very much that this is about the teacher trying to "catch out" children being tardy when the bus is late.

 

 

I think there are 2 different schools involved and the bus isn't going to the kindergarten, so that teacher would have no idea that there was a problem. Maybe I misunderstood, but I think the OP's schedule is as follows: 
 
1. Put her special needs DD on a school bus (which likely goes to a different school - otherwise the OP would take her with the middle DD)
2. 10 minute window to get her middle DD to the local kindergarten (where the DD will be punished for being tardy) 
3. While the OP also deals with a high needs toddler. 
 
That's a stressful morning for any mom.  I don't think the OP can be faulted for not being able to be in 2 places almost simultaneously - getting one DD on a school bus at her home and dropping the other DD at the local kindergarten. That's why I wondered if a neighbouring parent or older student couldn't take the middle daughter to kindergarten for her. 
 
I've had kids who have to ride the bus and their schedules are notoriously unreliable.  If a child at a previous stop is late or they have delays (and depending on what kind of special needs, there could be all sorts of reasons for delay), if the traffic is bad, if the weather slows things down.....it's fairly routine for a 5 or 10 minute delay to occur. I get the stress of trying to organize different pick up/drop offs for 2 kids at the same time. There have been some other helpful suggestions in the thread eg. explain to the school with the tardy policy, ask the bus company for a different pick up time. 
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#28 of 48 Old 08-30-2012, 06:37 AM
 
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I wouldn't write a letter of protest. I would sign the consent letter and return it to the school.

 

As a former teacher I understand the other side of the issue. The school needs to establish order and discipline so things can run smoothly. They need to make sure everyone understands and plays by the rules, and the rules need to be the same for everyone.

That being said, I agree with you. I'm opposed to punishment-and-reward based education. I want ds to learn and behave because he wants to and enjoys it, not out of fear, or to get something in return. But the advantages of public education by far outweigh this disadvantage (at least in my ds's case), so I don't worry too much about it.

 

Also, I find that ds's school and teachers (and most teachers I know) are extremely flexible. We were able to pull him out of school for a month for a trip to Europe (and plan to do it again next year). I didn't agree with the amount of homework ds got, so I approached ds's teacher and let her know he might not finish his homework every week. She was very understanding about it and at one point she even stopped correcting his homework shrug.gif.

 

If your dd likes school, I would be supportive about it. Most teachers are amazing, selfless and giving individuals (that's why I wasn't able to stay in the field; you give so much and get so little in return lol), and IF your dd has problems down the road, being late etc., you can always approach the school and find a solution. It doesn't have to be a harsh punishment like detention.

 

PS: I just read your second post. There is no doubt in my mind that a school would accommodate a family with a SN child, if you discuss with them.
 


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#29 of 48 Old 08-30-2012, 08:22 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Ollyoxenfree got it right... I have three daughters. Oldest dd is 13, special needs, rides the school bus. Bus comes to the house. Middle dd is in 1st grade at the school down the street, we walk, it takes about 7 minutes.

 

Older dd is in a wheelchair, as are all the other children who ride her bus. She rides with a nurse who drives to my house and parks her car to get on the bus with older dd. All of these factors take longer than your average bus ride. The nurse could be late. The lift could be broken. The child before us could have been running late. There could have been traffic or an accident. All of these things have happened in the past. Any one of those delays would cause middle dd to be late to school through no fault of her own, or my own in all fairness. I don't like it, and its not fair to dd but it is the way it is.

 

Things are not really better. I ended up speaking to the principal. I sent an email to the teacher letting her know I had concers about the discipline policy, specifically relating to detention and she forwarded my info to the principal and said that she does not give detention but knows it is a school wide policy. The principal said there have been very few cases where a 1st grader has gotten detention, but of course my 1st grader will be a 2nd 3rd and so on grader and I still won't like the policy. In other words, she was very nice and basically sugar coated everything but under all the sugar coating the punitive punishment was still there.

 

Today I found out from my daughter that they are not really allowed to talk during their lunch break because the lunch lady wants them to eat quietly. When I asked her what happens if she isn't quiet she said the lunch lady blows her whistle and it hurts her ears. To me this is going too far. They fill a childs day with nothing but following directions and rules, no free choices and then take away the few minutes they have unstructured and insist they be quiet? When do they get to be children? The day is dominated by school rules and they send homework home as well. The school of thought seems to be all rules no fun, and no time to be a kid.


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#30 of 48 Old 08-31-2012, 05:01 AM
 
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Does your DC want to go to school? 

 

ETA: 

 

It has been brought to my attention that this comment seemed like I was questioning whether Sensa70 should send her middle child to school at all. This could not be further from the reason I asked this question. I asked because I wanted to know how Sensa70's child was feeling about the school and I guess that most the 1st graders I know tend to express problems with the school setting by saying, "I don't want to go." Perhaps I've been around too many children lately and am starting to think and talk like them. twins.gif  Anyway, sorry to offend.  Carry on...


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