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Old 12-30-2013, 07:35 PM
 
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I'm in Maryland. 


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Old 12-30-2013, 07:37 PM
 
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They have only prepared high school common core up to Algebra II and only the richer schools will go further with math. The cc is basically set to get a kid into community college which is not a bad thing per se but I am not sure how the cc will relate to the college level anyway!? Does this mean that colleges have to change too? I mean the SAT's are changing. I am very curious to know!

I think it is pointless to meet with the principal he is pro-common core to the point that it has obviously not been implemented correctly. I'd be curious to know where you guys live that have schools implementing it correctly. I talked to my sister about it in Pennsylvania and she claims her kids are doing well in school also. I don't know if it is just NY.

Your first paragraph doesn't make any sense. Schools aren't going to stop teaching higher level math. They will likely use the curricula they used in the past. The CC isn't designed to prepare kids for community college, at all.
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Old 12-30-2013, 08:31 PM
 
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I'm in North Carolina. Kids in my school district definitely have the opportunity to take higher level math classes. From our district website:

Quote:
In the standard pathway, middle school students progress through Common Core Math 6, 7, & 8, then on to Common Core Math I in 9th grade.  At this juncture, students may continue on their current math trajectory to Common Core Math II and III, at which point they may choose from a variety of 4th year math courses which are in line with their college or career goals.  These courses include Honors Precalculus, AP Statistics, Advanced Functions and Modeling, or Discrete Math.  Alternatively, after completing Common Core Math I, there are some students’ whose performance data satisfies criteria for acceleration*, thus indicating they may be ready to move through the content more quickly.  These qualifying students may choose to move to the accelerated pathway of Honors Common Core Math II and III with precalculus embedded.  This alternate pathway essentially compacts 3 years of high school mathematics into two years so that students are then prepared to take AP Calculus in their senior year. 

For rising 6th graders whose previous performance data satisfies criteria for acceleration*, the accelerated middle school pathway, Compacted Common Core Math 6, 7, & Math I  compacts four years of math into three years by moving some 7th grade standards to 6th grade and some 8th grade standards to 7th grade.  Following this middle school pathway, students are on a trajectory to Honors Common Core Math II and III with precalculus embedded in 9th and 10th grade.  As described earlier, this pathway essentially compacts 3 years of high school mathematics into two years so that students on this trajectory are prepared to take AP Calculus in their junior year.  

 

I agree that your principal should have emailed you back and your child's teacher should be talking to you about the grading scale, but my 4th grader is getting 4s with the Common Core standards being implemented at our school, so I really come back to it being your child's teacher this year or the administration at your child's school. Do other parents of kids in your school report the same thing? Do you have any options to change schools (magnet programs, school choice, etc)?

 

I think you have some bad info on Common Core math. Check out what the Common Core standards say about high school math here: http://www.corestandards.org/Math/Content/note-on-courses-transitions/courses-transitions .

Quote:
 

The high school portion of the Standards for Mathematical Content specifies the mathematics all students should study for college and career readiness. These standards do not mandate the sequence of high school courses. However, the organization of high school courses is a critical component to implementation of the standards. To that end, sample high school pathways for mathematics – in both a traditional course sequence (Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II) as well as an integrated course sequence (Mathematics 1, Mathematics 2, Mathematics 3) – will be made available shortly after the release of the final Common Core State Standards. It is expected that additional model pathways based on these standards will become available as well.

The standards themselves do not dictate curriculum, pedagogy, or delivery of content. In particular, states may handle the transition to high school in different ways. For example, many students in the U.S. today take Algebra I in the 8th grade, and in some states this is a requirement. The K-7 standards contain the prerequisites to prepare students for Algebra I by 8th grade, and the standards are designed to permit states to continue existing policies concerning Algebra I in 8th grade.

 

I know parents of gifted kids in our district (there are a lot) were very concerned with making sure their kids got to take advanced math classes beyond in high school, but as you can see from what I quoted from our district website the administration worked it out so that the super gifted kids can go on AP Calc (A/B) and AP Calc (B/C) and Honors Math Topics or Discrete Mathematics after that. Those courses certainly aren't required for college admission, though. Pre-Calc satisfies the requirements for most well-regarded state colleges. When I was in high school Trig was adequate.


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Old 12-31-2013, 04:38 AM
 
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I don't have bad information. I have a headache and I think I am done with this topic. To pull up ALL the information about the common core math would cause me an even bigger headache. If you are really curious I can do it after work today.
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Old 12-31-2013, 05:24 AM
 
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I've looked at the HS math standards. I am curious about what you're seeing that you dislike so much.
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Old 12-31-2013, 10:38 AM
 
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I think it is really up to your school district how to implement Common Core math. Maybe my quote from the Common Core site was too long:

 

Quote:
 The K-7 standards contain the prerequisites to prepare students for Algebra I by 8th grade, and the standards are designed to permit states to continue existing policies concerning Algebra I in 8th grade.

 

If your school district previously offered Alg I in 8th grade they can continue to do so, as my district does for advanced students. My district does a regular course of Math I, II, III in high school with Algebra and Geometry spiraled in, instead of Algebra I, Geometry, Algebra II, but the discrete named courses area an option in Common Core also.  Some kids don't need to take AP Calc by senior year, but for those who do, or those who want to take it in their junior year that can be an option. From the way I'm reading it, Common Core is designed to offer 3 stepped courses (either Alg I, Geom, Alg II, or Common Core Math I, II, III) through a student's junior year and then the high school would offer continuing math classes (advanced math, etc) in the student's senior year as their district recommends.

 

In my district if a student is on a regular math track, not an advanced math track, their senior math class could be Honors Precalculus, AP Statistics, Advanced Functions and Modeling, or Discrete Math. If they are on an advanced track they could take AP calc in either their senior or junior years. I think they'd be well-prepared for college either way.  Our state university system lists which high school math courses they accept for college admission. They are: 

• Advanced Functions and Modeling

• Discrete Mathematics

• Pre-Calculus

• AP Statistics

• AP Calculus (AB)

• AP Calculus (BC)

A student following the basic common core path could take Pre-Calc, Advanced Functions, or Discrete Math in their senior year and still be ready for college. A student who was aiming for MIT or a STEM career could take the accelerated path ending with AP Calc in their junior year and a further advanced math in their senior year or AP Calc in their senior year. 

 

This article, while not touching on Common Core at all, might shed some light on what colleges are looking for as far as high school math classes for admission to college:  http://www.education.com/magazine/article/math-classes-college/

 

I think Common Core is a pretty hot button issue lately and has become pretty politicized, so it's hard to find resources that aren't either pro- or anti- Common Core, but I thought the above article was pretty straightforward and did not get sucked into the fray. I don't see my dd1 taking Calc, but she might do all right with AP Stats.


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Old 12-31-2013, 03:41 PM
 
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This is a letter I sent to our legislature here in NY. I also could provide notes from a talk that James Milgrim provided over the phone a few months back if you want it.

Good Evening,

I am writing to you tonight to ask you to use your position as a legislator to vote to stop Common Core immediately. The Common Core standards are of insufficient quality. They should not be o...ur state’s standards. Our students deserve more than subpar. The CC math standards fail to meet the targets recommended by the National Mathematics Advisory Panel (the standards of leading states and our international competitors). The Common Core math standards also require that geometry be taught by an experimental method that had never been used successfully anywhere in the world (this method of geometry was abandoned by a school for the gifted in Russia in the 1950s as their students failed to understand it and it led to a decline in the ability to do geometry). The Common Core math standards do not teach least common denominators; delay until sixth grade fluency in division; eliminate conversions between fractions, decimals and percents; adopt a new definition of algebra as “functional algebra” that de-emphasizes algebraic manipulation (http://www.washingtonpolicy.org/publications/notes/why-common-core-bad-america). In addition, Algebra 1 is moved to 9th grade, from 8th grade and the standards end at Algebra 2. Dr. James Milgram of Stanford University, the only mathematician on the Validation Committee, refused to sign off stating, “It’s almost a joke to think students in Common Core will be ready for math at any University.”

The CC Math Standards are NOT “rigorous” and will NOT prepare our children for a 4 year university and/or a STEM career or any career requiring an advanced degree. Jason Zimba, the writer of the Common Core math standards, stated that the “math standards will not prepare students for careers in STEM, for selective colleges. Please, listen to the following video of Jason Zimba in his own words, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eJZY4mh2rt8. Yet, even though the lead writer on the CC math standards says the standards are NOT enough, our children are being subjected to them. Their chances of getting into prestigious universities, Gone. Their chances of getting into 4 year universities, Gone. This is not the price our children should have to pay. They deserve a challenging and enriching education. And an education with options. Our schools should contain multiple models for our children to succeed, not just one.

Please vote to end Common Core.
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Old 12-31-2013, 03:52 PM
 
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Here is a better article that just came out last week.

http://www.educationviews.org/engineer-common-core-mathematics-standards/

That sad, I am not looking to get into a political argument or debate. You said you were curious and I provided.

Thanks.
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Old 12-31-2013, 04:47 PM
 
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even though the lead writer on the CC math standards says the standards are NOT enough, our children are being subjected to them. 

 

Forgive me, perhaps I'm misunderstanding, but aren't the CC standards just a set of core expectations? No one is telling teachers and students to avoid doing any teaching or learning outside or beyond the CC standards, they're just wanting to ensure that all students share this core learning. I don't think an education is ever complete when limited to what's contained within a curriculum or scope-and-sequence. Of course those math standards aren't sufficient preparation for competitive STEM fields. Why would it make sense to subject every child in America to standards designed to prepare them for competitive STEM careers? 

 

 

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Old 12-31-2013, 04:51 PM
 
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I highly doubt that kids aren't going to be taught to convert decimals, fractions, and percents. I'm not in the classroom anymore, but I just sent an email to one of my education specialist friends.
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Old 12-31-2013, 06:19 PM
 
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Don't we want what is best for our children? I am finding that common core is not and my daughter is crying in class over timed tests. My 8 year old. I am just trying to inform you of the other side of common core; the side that we don't know about. If you read Kris Neilsen's book Children of the Core it will give you a head start in that direction. I'm just trying to inform nothing more. I am done with this topic and just wanted to inform and thought this might be a good way to start that because I am one of the new members of the grassroots against this thing for my and all children.
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Old 12-31-2013, 07:07 PM
 
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Our state just adopted CC standards and they are much more rigorous than the standards we has before. A strong understanding of fractions, decimals, conversions, etc... is required and they go beyond learning by rote. I have not noticed an problems and this is the first year dd hasn't been subjected to timed tests so I am happy with it so far.
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Old 12-31-2013, 09:29 PM
 
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Don't we want what is best for our children? I am finding that common core is not and my daughter is crying in class over timed tests. My 8 year old. 

 

In our state there are standardized tests. Have been since I was a kid. For my DC (who is 12) the testing changed in 3rd grade - before CC. In our district students in 1-2  took the Stanford 10 and then in 3rd grade they took a more expansive timed test starting in 3rd grade called the Maryland State Assessments. In my state if you attributed an increase in testing stress and timed testing to CC, you would be wrong.

 

NO ONE here is going to tell you that crying over standardized testing is OK. It's not. But your are the mother and focusing on grassroots movement against CC is not what is going to have the most immediate effects on your child's well-being.  You need to speak with your children's teachers and principal. 

 
I am worried that a lot of what you're observing in your DC's school have little do with CC and your focus on that is preventing you from the type of activism that will effectively advocate for your children. 

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Old 12-31-2013, 09:53 PM
 
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Also, Slbrooks, there is the option to pull your child from testing. I have friends who do this. My bias is that it probably requires good communication with the school and real, honest intentions in terms of child well-being and ethical concerns over testing (over political ideology) but this is an option for you. 


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Old 01-01-2014, 01:14 AM
 
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Originally Posted by moominmamma View Post
 

 

Forgive me, perhaps I'm misunderstanding, but aren't the CC standards just a set of core expectations?

 

No, although they are billed as that, they are really a lot more than that. Common core dictates *how* students are to be taught and are backed up by highstakes testing (which is linked to funding) with higher cut scores that have been used in the past. In some content areas/grades, no one has seen the tests or knows what the cut scores will be. Plus, many people's jobs and salaries depend on the students doing well on the test, so there are lots of fear based decisions being made. Basically, this is a massive education experiment that the US is conducting this year. No one really knows how it will all play out.

 

Regarding highschool math....up til now, Algebra II has had a fairly set clear set of understood expectations, although it has never been qualified on a national level. Common Core Algebra II is different, and many high school teachers feel, dumbed down. Common core math emphasizes group learning, chatting about math, and a discovery approach. Districts are extremely pressured to use "common core" aligned text in hopes of doing well on the standardized test, but many math teachers are finding that common core aligned text do not teach to the level of understanding of traditional text. (some things, students just need to be taught and then practice.) There is a massive conflict between those whose jobs is it is ensure that students score well on the test, and those whose profession it is to teach highschool math. At this time, their primary goal simply is not the same. 

 

My DD is in honors Algebra II at a school that always tests very well. Her teacher, as well as most of the math teachers at the school, are refusing to follow the new standards because if they do, their students will not be ready for the math they have always taken the next year. It is massive situation, with the highest ranking school in our district in a war with the district officials, who are being leaned on by the state officials. The only reason that things have gotten to the point that they have is BECAUSE the school has such a solid academic reputation. But following common core would mean that the best and brightest math students won't be able to go forward in math in ways they have in the past, regardless of what you call the class. Because common core doesn't mean just covering things on a list, it means having the students sit around chatting and see if they can discover math on their own. So our school, with a very solid math program, the teacher are refusing to use common core aligned texts. I suspect that a lot of this will shake out in a couple of years, but for those students caught in the middle of it, it's a mess.

 

I work at an elementary school in the city which has many challenges and low test scores to go along with it. There, no teacher EVER says anything negative about common core because doing doing so is taken to mean that you don't believe that poor minority children can achieve as much as suburban white kids.  One thing that is missing from this thread is how common core is affecting students from low socio-economic groups and english language learners. From what I see, I am quite certain the common core will cause the highschool drop out rate to increase over the next few years.

 

One size fits all education doesn't work, and the while I am a little concerned over highschool math (I have a math bright highschooler preparing for a stem field, so this isn't a great time for her to get caught in an educational experiment) I'm far more concerned for kids at the school where I work. They get enough messages that they they won't amount to anything, and we try to counteract that every day. Common Core isn't helping. The district required texts* require TONS of homework, which many of our kiddos don't get help and support with, so we have them do it in what should be their recess. It sucks. Our state mandates how many hours a day a student who isn't proficient in English must study English each day, and it doesn't leave time for much else, but those kids get tested on common core too. The kids I feel the worse for are the one's with IQ's in the 70s. Under 70 gets opted out, but IQs of 70 and up are required to take the test and the assumption is that they can meet the standard. Have you ever done math with a child with an IQ of 72? I'm quite sure that who ever came up with all this BS never has. So, sometime next summer, most of these students: kids with no support at home, kids who barely speak english, and kids will low but normal IQs will get an official document from the State showing the myriad of ways they aren't college or career ready. Yee Haw. Won't that get them all excited about learning? 

 

 

(Those test scores and how they compare to monied suburban schools, where all the kids speak english and most have college grads for parents, are thought to reflect how well I and my co-workers do our jobs shake.gif).

 

 

* districts are making fear based decisions, and things are so top down that parents, teachers, and even principals have no input.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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Old 01-01-2014, 06:03 AM
 
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Thank you linda you explained it well. I didn't want to explain this but I will I am a noncustodial mom and have to have physical custody of my daughter to opt her out of her 3rd grade test. Believe me I would if I had physical custody of her. Like I said my friend who has kids going to the same school as my kids is homeschooling her 2nd grader. That is how bad that school is taking the common core. My next step actually is to email the 3rd grade teacher.

Oh what's funny is we didn't even discuss the ELA standards and how they have a recommended book list of pornography and how an Arizona school actually read from the book and it was outright porn. There are other problems with the ELA standards like teaching an UN document for 5 days.
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:49 AM
 
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Thank you linda you explained it well. I didn't want to explain this but I will I am a noncustodial mom and have to have physical custody of my daughter to opt her out of her 3rd grade test. Believe me I would if I had physical custody of her. Like I said my friend who has kids going to the same school as my kids is homeschooling her 2nd grader. That is how bad that school is taking the common core. My next step actually is to email the 3rd grade teacher.

Oh what's funny is we didn't even discuss the ELA standards and how they have a recommended book list of pornography and how an Arizona school actually read from the book and it was outright porn. There are other problems with the ELA standards like teaching an UN document for 5 days.

Please post a link to this list of pornography.
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Old 01-01-2014, 06:51 AM
 
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Oh what's funny is we didn't even discuss the ELA standards and how they have a recommended book list of pornography and how an Arizona school actually read from the book and it was outright porn. 

A brief search only brought me to sites that seemed to have a pretty heavy handed agenda for anything related to this story but I did find this: http://seventhtype.wordpress.com/2013/02/04/fact-vs-fiction-on-common-core-literature-requirements/

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post

 

One size fits all education doesn't work, and the while I am a little concerned over highschool math (I have a math bright highschooler preparing for a stem field, so this isn't a great time for her to get caught in an educational experiment) I'm far more concerned for kids at the school where I work. They get enough messages that they they won't amount to anything, and we try to counteract that every day. Common Core isn't helping. 

 

 

 I read several of the articles posted here and a few on my own from people/organizations opposed to CC and one of the things that stood out for me is that a lot of the criticism of CC were criticisms things that are already going on in my district. For us, there are already standards and testing and letters home to families with test scores (in our case it's pretty bleak because we live in a city with high poverty in a state that apparently ranks really high for overall performance so the results for city kids look bad in those little bar graphs).  

 

For me, I'm reading along about CC and it just seems like another big bureaucratic effort that probably won't amount to much because we have standards already and schools just do the best the can with them. I do love the idea of fewer themes with deeper chance for learning (especially for kids who may have less access to help at home and etc.).  

 

I don't know... reading your post makes me want to have a good discussion with some of the admins in my city to see what they *really* think. :D  If I ever get around to it I'll post here for sure! 


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Old 01-01-2014, 07:06 AM
 
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Thank you linda you explained it well. I didn't want to explain this but I will I am a noncustodial mom and have to have physical custody of my daughter to opt her out of her 3rd grade test. Believe me I would if I had physical custody of her. Like I said my friend who has kids going to the same school as my kids is homeschooling her 2nd grader. That is how bad that school is taking the common core. My next step actually is to email the 3rd grade teacher.
 

Yes, email your child's teacher. And take some time to suss out the core details of what you want to discuss. Remember that even if your DC's teacher likes CC that teachers is intimately aware of the challenges to education on a level that you can never begin to understand. Treat this teacher like professional she/he is and ask for help with your valid concerns for your child. 

 

There is no excuse for your DC's principal not writing you back but there are ways that you can communicate with teachers and admins that can go a long way towards facilitating healthy communication. 

 

I have seen threads here on Mothering where a parent has asked for help/feedback with drafting a letter to a teacher/admin/district. 


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Old 01-01-2014, 07:52 AM
 
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One thing that is missing from this thread is how common core is affecting students from low socio-economic groups and english language learners.

 

With a country with an all too high percentage of children living in low-income families I was wondering to what extent CC was developed with those children in mind. Being about half of our nation's children...how could it not?  But even if one believes that CC seriously considered those children, we can all acknowledge that this type of policy is not really the answer. 

 

This looks like a good, basic article on that issue. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/finding_common_ground/2013/08/can_the_common_core_fix_poverty.html 

 

Here is the final sentence from that article:

Quote:
"We should always have high expectations for our students, even those living in poverty, but schools can't do it alone and the Common Core is not the silver bullet solution." 

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Old 01-01-2014, 08:45 AM
 
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Okay I will look for where it lists the books they want 10th graders to read. I know the Bluest Eye was one of them and that does get pornographic a little. I read it when I was 37 years old.
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Old 01-01-2014, 08:48 AM
 
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This talks about the Bluest Eye in particular and I was wrong it was for 11th graders to read. I'm still googling.

http://whatiscommoncore.wordpress.com/2013/08/26/a-sickening-turn-of-events-common-core-approved-pornography-may-or-may-not-be-on-this-years-standardized-test/
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:01 AM
 
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:08 AM
 
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I don't really need help emailing the teacher. Thanks though!
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Old 01-01-2014, 09:47 AM
 
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I don't really need help emailing the teacher. Thanks though!

Good luck!  I have found that communication with my DC's school can sometimes be a difficult dance but ALWAYS worth it. :)


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Old 01-01-2014, 12:09 PM
 
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Old 01-01-2014, 12:41 PM
 
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I'm far more concerned for kids at the school where I work. They get enough messages that they they won't amount to anything, and we try to counteract that every day. Common Core isn't helping. 

 

Thanks for the explanation. I'm certainly no fan of standardized testing or of one-size-fits-all education. And as a Canadian looking in from the outside the problems in the US education system seem so tragic because the solution looks patently obvious to me: abolish the local funding system which penalizes kids born into municipalities of low SE status by giving them under-funded, under-resourced schools and then beats them down further for under-performing. It's the exact opposite of what kids living in poverty should be getting. There should be little to no disparity between rich and poor school districts, and where a disparity exists the advantage should run the other way: with disadvantaged kids given more. Sorry ... talk about getting political!

 

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Old 01-01-2014, 02:41 PM
 
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CC math isn't all about talking about mah and discovering on your own. There are discussion elements as kids are tasked with explaining how they solved problems but these aren't diarrhea mouth discussions, teachers choose children which used effective methods or who made a common mistake can clear up misconceptions. There is also a traditional aspect and on occasionally tackling a difficult problem through discovery after completing a unit in more traditional ways. It is modeled off the approach they take in countries that excel in math.
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Old 01-01-2014, 04:07 PM
 
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the US education system seem so tragic because the solution looks patently obvious to me: abolish the local funding system which penalizes kids born into municipalities of low SE status by giving them under-funded, under-resourced schools and then beats them down further for under-performing. It's the exact opposite of what kids living in poverty should be getting.

 

That's now how it works. Schools are primarily funded at the state level, and the state provides a set amount per student. Additional money comes from the federal government for "title 1" schools. These are low income schools, determined by having a certain percentage of students living below the poverty line. (I think it's 80% to qualify for funding, the school I work is 95% below the poverty line). Title 1 money exist because every one knows that it cost MORE money to educate children living in poverty. Schools have some discretion about how to spend that money, but lots of it goes to math and reading special instruction for kids in the bottom quartile. (There are also additional federal monies for special needs students).

 

Schools do have the option of raising additional money, and that goes better for monied schools than none monied schools.

 

It really isn't the school that beats kids down -- not around here anyone. But there are lots of society messages that some kids, such black or Latino young men, aren't going to amount to much.

 

Another crappy thing about common core and money is that districts replaced math and reading curriculum with common core aligned texts, which costs fortune. Usually, only one subject is replaced a year and it rotates from subject to subject. So, what ever subject was up for replacement this year didn't get replaced, and schools spent twice as much money on new books (which has to come out of the budget some where.) There's no way this isn't impacting untested subjects, such as science and social studies.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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Old 01-01-2014, 04:31 PM
 
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CC math isn't all about talking about mah and discovering on your own. There are discussion elements as kids are tasked with explaining how they solved problems but these aren't diarrhea mouth discussions, teachers choose children which used effective methods or who made a common mistake can clear up misconceptions. There is also a traditional aspect and on occasionally tackling a difficult problem through discovery after completing a unit in more traditional ways. It is modeled off the approach they take in countries that excel in math.

 

Common core is a bit of an octopus -- are you talking about ALL math from k-algebra II, and have you reviewed the text books and testing methodologies for all those levels? I haven't, but I did review the Algebra II book and I agree with the teacher -- it's crap.

 

Our best and brightest kids attending our best schools already do very well in math. Common core was theoretically designed to decrease the performance gap between our high achieving schools and our low achieving schools. There really wasn't a need to jerk around schools like the one where my DD attends.

 

Remember than nothing about common core has been tested -- the texts haven't been tested, the tests haven't been tested. Its all a big experiment.

 

and another thing -- common core requires all students complete Algebra II to graduate from highschool. So either Algebra II isn't going to be what it used to be, or lots of kids will not graduate highschool because ---  not everyone's brain works in the ways required to do Algebra II.

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 I read several of the articles posted here and a few on my own from people/organizations opposed to CC and one of the things that stood out for me is that a lot of the criticism of CC were criticisms things that are already going on in my district. For us, there are already standards and testing and letters home to families with test scores

...

 

I don't know... reading your post makes me want to have a good discussion with some of the admins in my city to see what they *really* think. :D  If I ever get around to it I'll post here for sure! 

 

In many states, common core is taking what was already nutty and making it far, far worse. More testing for more grades, longer tests, formative standardized tests to make sure they will do well on the end of year test, testing for Kindergarteners, and even..... weekly standardized tests to make sure kids are learning what they are supposed to.

 

And the cut scores!!!! These are completely arbitrary with common core but higher than expected in the past. Tests scores are expected to drop by about 30%. Lots more kids will be deemed to be not where they should be. I honestly would be surprised if you got a straight answer out of an administrator. This is very top down, and not being gun hoe about it could reflect very poorly on an administrator. If you try to find out what they think, ask sideways questions such as how much additional time is needed for formative assessments, or how are the addresses english language learners. I wouldn't bother asking "what do you think of common core?"


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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