DVDs in the classroom? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-04-2013, 02:28 PM - Thread Starter
 
hparsh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

My son just started Kindergarten yesterday in a public school. He told me his teacher had them watch LeapFrog's "Letter Factory" and today they watched another DVD on words that rhyme. I am super annoyed that the teacher is having them watch TV. Am I overreacting?

hparsh is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-04-2013, 02:46 PM
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 4,031
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)

Yes

Imakcerka is offline  
Old 09-04-2013, 04:25 PM
 
zebra15's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: State of Confusion
Posts: 4,746
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)

Media is a tool for learning in classrooms.  Dvd's smartboards, computers, etc all play a part in the classroom.  The teacher may have only shown a small portion of the video to reinforce what was being taught that day or she may have shown the entire 30 minute movie to teach a lesson.  Administration is encouraging teachers to use media and technology as much as possible in our district.  

 

Not all kids learn from direct teaching, some learn from videos, some learn from hands on, some learn from worksheets,  The school will have various methods of teaching so all kids have a chance to learn as best as possible.


Mom to J and never-ending , 0/2014 items decluttered, 0/52 crafts crafts completed  crochetsmilie.gif homeschool.gif  reading.gif  modifiedartist.gif

Seeking zen in 2014.  Working on journaling and finding peace this year.  Spending my free time taking J to swimteam

zebra15 is online now  
Old 09-04-2013, 04:56 PM
 
blessedwithboys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 3,561
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 19 Post(s)

I don't think it's an overreaction if it was a full length video.  If it was just a few minutes, that would irk me but not cause me great rage.  Not like last year when ds's teacher told the kids to use Wikipedia to do a history worksheet, or this year when his "exploratory wheel" elective turned out to be online chess for the first grading period.  (FTR, I handled that one!)


Bring back the old MDC
blessedwithboys is online now  
Old 09-04-2013, 05:25 PM
 
NiteNicole's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 4,580
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 8 Post(s)

I can think of a few reasons this might happen.

 

Was this during rest time?  In my state, there's a certain amount of nap time/rest time built into full-day kindergarten.  I have heard that sometimes a class won't have many nappers, so they will get out their mats, lie down, and watch a video.

 

Also, a lot of assessment goes on in the first few days and weeks.  Most classes don't have aids anymore so I can see how a teacher might spend one on one time or small-group time with one or more kids and keep the rest occupied with a video.

 

If it worries you, send a note in and ask.  I would say something like, we limit screen time at home so we'd like to factor in any DVDs or videos he may be watching in class...and see if an explanation is forthcoming.

NiteNicole is online now  
Old 09-04-2013, 11:35 PM
 
grumpybear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 898
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I'd sit on it for a bit and observe. If this is a regular thing, then I might say something. FWIW, leapfrog letter factory is what taught my kids how to read.
grumpybear is offline  
Old 09-04-2013, 11:47 PM
 
Oread's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 171
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

Also, keep in mind its only the first week of school. Even in college the first week of classes just seemed like getting into a rythym - there isn't a lot of work to be done, its mostly review and getting used to being back in class. Particularly in Kindergarten I bet lots of the kids will take some time to adjust, and using videos is probably sort of fun for the kids and an easy way to ease into the school year - besides, Kindergarten isn't exactly academically rigorous... is the DVD going to take away from precious coloring time? ;)

Oread is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 06:33 AM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,623
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)

look at it this way. they are not really watching a movie. the DVD is a tool for them to remember. it does not have commercials or characters. its not spiderman teaching them letters. i think the video is great for auditory learners. so i personally think its great the teacher is showing the video. 

 

so yes you are overreacting. its the first day. see what happens. 

 

in our school at K while the kids were on the carpet, the teacher played a video sorta like leapfrog for the alphabets. it wasnt passive watching either. the kids watched and recited along with the DVD. then the dvd would quiz them. they would have to reply and the teacher watched this and saw how the whole class was learning. 

 

once in a great while they watched part of a movie from grade 1. the kids loved it. it was a treat. 


 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:11 AM - Thread Starter
 
hparsh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by zebra15 View Post
 

Media is a tool for learning in classrooms.  Dvd's smartboards, computers, etc all play a part in the classroom.  The teacher may have only shown a small portion of the video to reinforce what was being taught that day or she may have shown the entire 30 minute movie to teach a lesson.  Administration is encouraging teachers to use media and technology as much as possible in our district.

 

Not all kids learn from direct teaching, some learn from videos, some learn from hands on, some learn from worksheets,  The school will have various methods of teaching so all kids have a chance to learn as best as possible.

I guess I can understand that, but it bothered me that it was done on the first day.

 

I found out she showed another video again yesterday (the second day).

hparsh is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:13 AM - Thread Starter
 
hparsh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by blessedwithboys View Post

 

I don't think it's an overreaction if it was a full length video.  If it was just a few minutes, that would irk me but not cause me great rage.  Not like last year when ds's teacher told the kids to use Wikipedia to do a history worksheet, or this year when his "exploratory wheel" elective turned out to be online chess for the first grading period.  (FTR, I handled that one!)





I know "Letter Factory" is more than a few minutes, since I have that DVD at home. It goes through each letter in the alphabet and what sound it makes. It is actually a very effective video, but I didn't expect a teacher to be using it in a classroom.



 



I asked my son how long they watched videos the first and second day, and he told me a half hour, but he's 5, so I don't know how accurate his perception of time is.

hparsh is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:17 AM - Thread Starter
 
hparsh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by NiteNicole View Post

 

I can think of a few reasons this might happen.



 



Was this during rest time?  In my state, there's a certain amount of nap time/rest time built into full-day kindergarten.  I have heard that sometimes a class won't have many nappers, so they will get out their mats, lie down, and watch a video.



 



Also, a lot of assessment goes on in the first few days and weeks.  Most classes don't have aids anymore so I can see how a teacher might spend one on one time or small-group time with one or more kids and keep the rest occupied with a video.



 



If it worries you, send a note in and ask.  I would say something like, we limit screen time at home so we'd like to factor in any DVDs or videos he may be watching in class...and see if an explanation is forthcoming.





I don't think it was during rest time, and the entire class watched it together.



 



Your idea about the note is a good one. I don't want to be one of "those moms" complaining after only a few days, but I do want to know if this will be a regular occurrence. I think my biggest fear is that the teacher will pop in a video every day instead of having them do something hands-on.

hparsh is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:19 AM - Thread Starter
 
hparsh's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 392
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by Oread View Post

 

Also, keep in mind its only the first week of school. Even in college the first week of classes just seemed like getting into a rythym - there isn't a lot of work to be done, its mostly review and getting used to being back in class. Particularly in Kindergarten I bet lots of the kids will take some time to adjust, and using videos is probably sort of fun for the kids and an easy way to ease into the school year - besides, Kindergarten isn't exactly academically rigorous... is the DVD going to take away from precious coloring time? wink1.gif





I don't expect it to be academically rigorous, but I would rather they do just about anything other than watch TV.

hparsh is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:48 AM
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 4,031
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 10 Post(s)

The videos are a good way of engaging littles.  Kinder is hard for them with all the changes going on and showing a video about the alphabet in a way that engages them or gets their attention is no different than when I had to listen to my kinder teacher sing the alphabet badly.  Screech really.  It wasn't engaging... but watching the spit on her stache was interesting.  I was always boggled by that spit laddened mustache.

Imakcerka is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 09:51 AM
 
MamadeRumi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)

Well, as a university professor I use the occasional DVD in the classroom.  I don't use them daily, and I don't show the whole film, but I show occasional clips to give one director's interpretation of a piece of literature, and then to ask them to come up with their own interpretation.  So I understand the value of DVDs in the classroom.  But, that said, I totally get your concerns about this in a kindergarten class, especially in the first week of class.  It is one thing to just be getting back into the swing of things and transitioning back from summer when you are talking about older children or adults, but kindergartners?  This is their first time in a classroom.  I'd want their early classroom experiences to not be filled with watching a screen.

 

After the first few weeks my feeling about it would depend on how often it was used, how much was shown, and what the purpose and context was.  If you show a class a short film and ask them to talk about it or do some activity responding to it, that seems better to me than asking them to just sit and watch passively.  Still, a PP comments about how their K uses dvds when the children are on the carpet really disturbed me.  Children of that age respond really well to a teacher reading them a story, or to circle time, in which they can sing and dance and interact with the teacher and the other kids.  I don't think a DVD substitutes for that, and the teacher watching to see that everyone is learning is not the same as the teacher interacting with the students and establishing a relationship that can help them learn. And at that age I really believe that too much screen time cheats kids of their own imaginative abilities.  They stop being able to listen to a story and picture it in their head if they are always seeing somebody do that for them.

 

As for kindergarten not being academically rigorous, maybe not, but I learned to read in kindergarten, and my 3 year old DS is already reading and will start kindergarten with the skill, so it doesn't have to be just coloring and videos. I actually remember getting in trouble with a substitute sunday school teacher when she had us coloring.  She noticed that I had gone outside the line (never liked staying in them -- didn't see the point), and she said, "you are going outside the lines.  My kindergartners can color inside the lines. I teach my students to color inside the lines in kindergarten."  I responded, "really, my teacher teaches us how to read."  I wasn't trying to be a smart ass -- just telling the truth, but she didn't like it. 

 

If it were my son, I would contact the teacher.  I would be polite and not accusing, but I would say, as a PP suggested, that I limit my son's screen time at home, and that I want to know how much he is watching in school.  Then I'd ask about the purpose of the DVDs, how much is being shown, etc.  Start a conversation, a pleasant one, and see where that leads. 

MamadeRumi is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 11:55 AM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,623
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamadeRumi View Post
 

Still, a PP comments about how their K uses dvds when the children are on the carpet really disturbed me.  Children of that age respond really well to a teacher reading them a story, or to circle time, in which they can sing and dance and interact with the teacher and the other kids.  I don't think a DVD substitutes for that, and the teacher watching to see that everyone is learning is not the same as the teacher interacting with the students and establishing a relationship that can help them learn. And at that age I really believe that too much screen time cheats kids of their own imaginative abilities.  They stop being able to listen to a story and picture it in their head if they are always seeing somebody do that for them.

i think you are jumping to conclusions out here. you are making quite an assumption. most of the K schools use some form of media in their classrooms and i am very happy about that because children respond SO well to that. 

 

the video is maybe 5 minutes. while teh kids on the carpet are reciting the alphabets and saying aloud the reading words along with the video the teacher is not just sitting around doing nothing. she is taking attendance and keeping an eye on the children - watching which child is going to have a hard day that day (she had quite a few challenging children that year) which one cant sit still, which one is still struggling with the words. 

 

teachers are human beings too as you well know and its nice for them to have downtime to observe teh kids. esp. in K. all of us parents pooled in our time to be able to volunteer in teh classroom. 

 

the first week of K is the hardest. and for the letter factory video it would give the teacher enough time to see who could sit still and who was responding to the video and who knew their alphabets. 

 

i have volunteered in dd's class and i esp. worked with those kids who struggled to learn. the reason why they even knew had a lot with those DVDs. they associated sounds and funny pictures as clues and i'd actually see their mind work as they made the connections and came up with the answer. 


 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:29 PM
 
MamadeRumi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
 

i think you are jumping to conclusions out here. you are making quite an assumption. most of the K schools use some form of media in their classrooms and i am very happy about that because children respond SO well to that. 

 

the video is maybe 5 minutes. while teh kids on the carpet are reciting the alphabets and saying aloud the reading words along with the video the teacher is not just sitting around doing nothing. she is taking attendance and keeping an eye on the children - watching which child is going to have a hard day that day (she had quite a few challenging children that year) which one cant sit still, which one is still struggling with the words. 

 

teachers are human beings too as you well know and its nice for them to have downtime to observe teh kids. esp. in K. all of us parents pooled in our time to be able to volunteer in teh classroom. 

Well, five minutes I would feel a bit differently about, as I think I said.  But you didn't specify that it was for five minutes, and the OP was talking about a 35 minute video.  Regardless, my personal opinion is that I'd rather not see it in the first week of kindergarten, when the stage for their whole educational career is being set.  And yes, I do know very well that teachers are human beings, since I am one and have several others in my family, not to mention the teachers I teach and mentor.  And I didn't say that the teacher was doing nothing, I said that her watching how everyone is learning is not as helpful, in my opinion and experience, as reading to them or leading them in an alphabet song, or playing an educational game with them, etc.  If it were later in the semester and a 5 minute video was occasionally being shown and that was in addition to the teacher reading to them and getting them actively involved in learning, I would be fine with that.  But as a teacher and a parent, I personally wouldn't want to see my son's teacher showing a 30 minute video every day for the first week of kindergarten. 

 

The OP asked if she was overreacting.  You said she was.  I feel she wasn't.  We have different opinions.  That's O.K.

MamadeRumi is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:37 PM
 
meemee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Norther California
Posts: 12,623
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by MamadeRumi View Post
 

The OP asked if she was overreacting.  You said she was.  I feel she wasn't.  We have different opinions.  That's O.K.

The OP also said she has no clue how long the video was shown for. she said her son said something but she is not sure how accurate he was. 

 

under those circumstances i still think she was over reacting without having all the pieces. plus it was just the first day. a video shown for a certain length of time on day one. reason to get mad - no.

 

but wait and watch and see what's happening the whole week. THEN you have reason for reaction. until then. no. 

 

but yeah difference of opinion is always ok. 


 treehugger.gif Co-parent, joy.gifcold.gifbrand new homeschooling middle schoolerjoy.gif, and an attackcat.gif 
meemee is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:54 PM
 
MamadeRumi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 5 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by meemee View Post
 

The OP also said she has no clue how long the video was shown for. she said her son said something but she is not sure how accurate he was. 

 

under those circumstances i still think she was over reacting without having all the pieces. plus it was just the first day. a video shown for a certain length of time on day one. reason to get mad - no.

 

but wait and watch and see what's happening the whole week. THEN you have reason for reaction. until then. no. 

 

but yeah difference of opinion is always ok. 

But it IS a 35 minute video. And she was talking about the first two days, not just one.  In my original post I said I wouldn't have a problem with a short clip being shown, but I'd be upset about an entire video being shown, especially during the first week.  Personally, I wouldn't wait until the end of the week.  I would politely, graciously talk to the teacher now.  I would want my students to come and talk to me (yes, after the first day), if they were concerned about something.  The elementary school teachers in my family are always happy to hear from parents, as long as they aren't hearing complaints and accusations without being given a chance to explain their reasoning.  I don't think a polite conversation with the teacher is something she has to wait on.  She may find out that her son is exaggerating and that they in fact only watched five minutes.  Now my personal opinion, based on my experience as a teacher and a student and a mother and an aunt, is that a video is still not ideal during the first week of kindergarten, but I understand and respect the fact that other people have different opinions.

MamadeRumi is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 12:54 PM
 
mar123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Has that school implemented Common Core? I teach 10th grade English and have been for 18 years. This is the first year we are using the full Common Core Curriculum, and I am AMAZED at the number of videos I am "required" to show. I show a clip or full length movie at least every other day. Later in the quarter, I have to show Bend It Like Beckham- the whole movie. I have only every shown two entire movies- Julius Caesar (read an act, watch an act) and To Kill a Mockingbird. Media is a HUGE part of CCSS. Just a though.

mar123 is offline  
Old 09-05-2013, 04:57 PM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,637
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by NiteNicole View Post

 

Also, a lot of assessment goes on in the first few days and weeks.  Most classes don't have aids anymore so I can see how a teacher might spend one on one time or small-group time with one or more kids and keep the rest occupied with a video.

 

yep. Kinders can't do anything on their own, so for the teacher to do the required assessments with each child, she has to keep the whole rest of the room occupied. It really is better for her to find out NOW who knows the alphabet, who can count, etc. etc. etc. She is most likely taking this time so that the year can be more productive. Later in the year, the kids will be able to do centers while she rechecks kids, but they can't do that.

 

Also, the first couple of days can be bedlam in K if you live in an area where lots of parents feel that Kindergarten Roundup is beneath them -- kids just show up, some with special needs. The amount of paper work and shuffling is pretty incredible. 

 

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post
 

Has that school implemented Common Core? I teach 10th grade English and have been for 18 years. This is the first year we are using the full Common Core Curriculum, and I am AMAZED at the number of videos I am "required" to show. I show a clip or full length movie at least every other day. Later in the quarter, I have to show Bend It Like Beckham- the whole movie. I have only every shown two entire movies- Julius Caesar (read an act, watch an act) and To Kill a Mockingbird. Media is a HUGE part of CCSS. Just a though.

 

offtopic.gif  I'm starting to hate common core for highschool.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
Old 09-06-2013, 05:58 AM
 
mar123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

Linda- I have been teaching long enough to know how to get rid of the fluff in CCSS and add in what is missing-because a lot is missing, IMO. I am worried that there are many teachers who don't know how to do it or are too lazy to do it. I'm glad my kids are in private school and almost done. I know educational fads come and go, but this one has the potential to really screw up generations of kids.

mar123 is offline  
Old 09-06-2013, 10:55 AM
 
Polliwog's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 3,999
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 22 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post

Has that school implemented Common Core? I teach 10th grade English and have been for 18 years. This is the first year we are using the full Common Core Curriculum, and I am AMAZED at the number of videos I am "required" to show. I show a clip or full length movie at least every other day. Later in the quarter, I have to show Bend It Like Beckham- the whole movie. I have only every shown two entire movies- Julius Caesar (read an act, watch an act) and To Kill a Mockingbird. Media is a HUGE part of CCSS. Just a though.

I'm confused. I am very familiar with the K-5 standards and only slightly familiar with the HS CC standards. So, I'm going to assume that the standards are either very different for the older grades or you are talking about the curriculum your district/state is using to help implement the standards. There is no required texts for elementary grades. There are types of books that have to be read and lists of exemplars, but those are just that...examples. I've never heard that there are CC requirements for watching videos. My DD's new charter school may not even have the equipment to show videos. My state adopted the CC standards last year and neither my kindergartner nor my second grader were required to watch videos as part of their curriculum.

I've taught kindergarten and have been a kindergarten mom/regular volunteer for three years. The beginning of kindergarten is very busy and there's a lot of data that needs to be collected about each child. I probably wouldn't stress about a daily video in the first few days. At least it has educational content. I'd rather the kids spend that time in centers, but Leapfrog isn't the end of the world.
Polliwog is offline  
Old 09-06-2013, 11:19 AM
 
mar123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I am talking about the curriculum that my district adopted to be compliant with CCSS- it is called Springboard. We were up for textbook adoption, but the textbooks were not yet aligned with CCSS, so we using Springboard. We are "required" to do 95% of the units we choose, and it is within those units where the videos lurk. The PARCC assessments, which go along with CCSS, all have video formats- in other words, the students will be required to watch a video and read a passage, and answer questions synthesizing information from both. Within the ELA Common Core standards for 9th and 10th grade, there are multiple standards with references to "multiple forms of media"- both in presentation from the student or with regard to the teaching the teacher does. The "media" is primarily videos- not all movies, but video nonetheless. (we use NBC learn in my district for many video sources; it was a gift from Shell)

mar123 is offline  
Old 09-06-2013, 07:13 PM
 
Linda on the move's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: basking in the sunshine
Posts: 10,637
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 85 Post(s)

offtopic.gif  my entire post is completely off topic. bag.gif

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by Polliwog View Post


 There is no required texts for elementary grades.

 

Although the national standards say that no texts are required, the stakes are so high for end of year test and states and districts are under so much financial pressure to do well on the test, decisions about curriculum are very much driven by the test and very much driven from the top down. Also, the standards for high school math say that they don't dictate how to get to end result of the body of knowledge to be learned, but they also dictate that kids should learn in a discovery style, work in groups to try to figure out how to get an answer, study problems that have been worked incorrectly, etc. They are really quite hideous. They are also completely experimental. Overnight, we changed all the highschool math text to new, untested math books.

 

The "no required texts" thing is really a big joke.

 

The way this plays out at my DD's highschool:

DD's school has a solid track record both on how *most* students do on the state standardized test and a high rate of students taking AP calc (and passing the end exam). None the less, the teachers (through Algebra II, which is where common core standards end) were handed new text books -- which they hate and feel are watered down crap that will make it harder for the students to learn math.  Most are refusing to use the text books and are just photocopying like mad to give their students actual, instructional math.  I think there could be a coop by the end of the year.

 

The new textbooks were a district decision, but the district is under tremendous pressure from the state. Due to the way English Language Learners were accounted for under NCLB, some of the schools in our district were D or F schools.  (My DD's school, which has almost no ELLs, is an A school, but the district is taking over more decisions out of fear of losing control of some schools to the state.)

 

The whole situation is nuts.


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

Linda on the move is online now  
Old 09-11-2013, 03:14 AM
 
heket's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: Ruling my own Library
Posts: 2,698
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mar123 View Post

Has that school implemented Common Core? I teach 10th grade English and have been for 18 years. This is the first year we are using the full Common Core Curriculum, and I am AMAZED at the number of videos I am "required" to show. I show a clip or full length movie at least every other day. Later in the quarter, I have to show Bend It Like Beckham- the whole movie. I have only every shown two entire movies- Julius Caesar (read an act, watch an act) and To Kill a Mockingbird. Media is a HUGE part of CCSS. Just a though.

Do you have any documentation demonstrating this that you can share? Does the mandate come from your district?
heket is offline  
Old 09-11-2013, 08:16 AM
 
mar123's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 572
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

The "book" we are using is called "Springboard"; is it put out by the AP people- it is considered Pre-AP. My boss tells me I have to use 95% of the three units we chose. Is that documented anywhere? Probably not, but I know what I have been told. You can maybe find some examples of Springboard lessons and materials online; it's been around for a few years.

 

Tomorrow I am to show 15 minute clips from 3 videos- then the students are to look at the theatrical techniques used and compare and contrast them. Friday starts 4 days of showing Bend it like Beckham so they can analyze cultural differences.

mar123 is offline  
 

Tags
School
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off