Should peanut butter be banned in schools? - Mothering Forums
Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 87 Old 11-10-2013, 04:01 AM - Thread Starter
 
mamazee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: US midwest
Posts: 7,500
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
My younger daughter's preschool has totally banned all nuts, peanuts, nut butters, and anything containing them from the schools. They don't do lunch checks but trust parents to just not send anything having any degree of nuts.

My older daughter is in middle school now and I don't know what rules they have because very few people there bring lunch - most including my daughter get hot lunch, but the elementary school she was going to had a lot of nut and peanut allergies but didn't ban anything. According to a newsletter, they said they felt that it might make kids with allergies relax thinking that nuts were banned so everything was safe, but because there were too many kids to really trust that everyone was going to be conscious and careful and not bring anything with nuts, it was better to allow them and make sure kids with allergies remained on alert as far as snacks, birthday treats, etc. go. They have nut free tables at the cafeteria and those they do monitor very very carefully. They said they'd rather have only areas actually within their control be called "nut free." They can't control the whole school so they don't claim it is nut free or attempt to make it be nut free.

I don't know what the best method is. I have gone back and forth on this. I'm fine with not bringing anything related to nuts, though my younger one is picky and one of the few healthy/proteiny things I can pack that won't go bad and she'll eat is nuts. But I am managing to not send anything with nuts so it's working OK, and I'd rather have the inconvenience then risk anyone having an allergic reaction due to her lunch.

I don't know if the school that allows nuts is just claiming it's safer to allow them and remain on alert and control those areas they can, or if that was just an excuse to allow nuts. I can see both potentials there.

What do your kids' schools do? What do you think is the best way to handle nuts and peanuts when it's such a common and dangerous allergy?
HappyHappyMommy likes this.
mamazee is offline  
#2 of 87 Old 11-10-2013, 04:32 AM
 
100%mom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,121
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My oldest went to a nut free kindergarten. Now my kids are in a school that allows nuts. Personally, I think the nut free table is better then the nut free school. My 2nd child won't eat a meat and cheese sandwich if that's all I have to send. He takes peanut butter every day. Anything else just comes home uneaten.
lrj85 likes this.

SAHM  to 6run.gif

100%mom is offline  
#3 of 87 Old 11-10-2013, 08:46 AM
 
whatsnextmom's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Posts: 1,928
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 12 Post(s)

My son went to a school with a nut-free class and lunch table. The girl that needed it wasn't in his grade and so it didn't effect him but we would not have complained (sunflower butter isn't so bad an alternative.)

 

At my kids youth theatre, there are a couple severe cases. When they are in a show, no peanut butter is allowed. Other things can have nuts as long as they are labeled (and the kids really know what to look for) but the peanut butter has a tendency to just spread onto everything. It's not been difficult even on days when meals are provided. 


Married mom of two, DD 17 and DS 13.
whatsnextmom is online now  
#4 of 87 Old 11-11-2013, 10:38 PM
 
grumpybear's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 918
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My son's classroom is nut free owing to the fact that he has a classmate or two with nut allergies. The lunch room isn't nut free but there is a nut free table.
Maybe they banned it in preschool because preschoolers aren't that mindful yet when they eat and poses a higher risk of contaminating each other's lunch?
grumpybear is offline  
#5 of 87 Old 11-12-2013, 01:06 AM
 
katelove's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 3,780
Mentioned: 1 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 14 Post(s)
My LOs kindy (she starts next Jan) is peanut free. The children all eat together so it would be very difficult and exclusionary to have a nut-free table. There are only 22 kids in the class so the poor little nut-free soul would probably be sitting alone. And them there would be the issue of kid having peanut butter on their hands or clothes and it getting onto play equipment etc.

I don't know how it is enforced but the teachers eat with the kids so I guess they keep an eye on what is in the lunch boxes and mention it to the parents if any peanuts creep in. I imagine that there is not an allergic child in every intake so a learning curve for new parents is acceptable.

Mother of two spectacular girls, born mid-2010 and late 2012  mdcblog5.gif

katelove is online now  
#6 of 87 Old 11-13-2013, 12:12 PM
 
KSLaura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado
Posts: 485
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Older DD brings a peanut butter sandwich to school several times a week. Kids eat in their classrooms, and are welcome to bring in whatever they want to eat for lunch.

Younger DD is allergic to peanuts. Her pre-school frequently serves peanut butter, giving her a nut-free alternative.


" rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/familybed2.gif">familybed2.gif  DD1 12/05, DD2 12/08


Computer Engineer- I write better in 1's and 0's. ;-)
KSLaura is offline  
#7 of 87 Old 11-13-2013, 01:53 PM
 
Backroads's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Washington Terrace, Utah
Posts: 234
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)

This is a tough one for me, but after some thought I have no problem with elementary schools banning nuts on account of the youth and lack of experience of the kids.  Jr. high and up, though, I would assume those kids with allergies should know how to take precautions for themselves


--Breastfeeding----2nd grade Teaching----Cosleeping----Cloth Diapering -- --Bookworm Mom
Backroads is offline  
#8 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 03:29 AM
 
alaskanmomma's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Anchorage, AK
Posts: 947
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I don't mind schools being nut free establishments if there's a child with a known life threatening allergy to them in the school. However, I'd wonder how the parents plan on protecting their child outside of the home and a nut free school. Not every place is going to be nut free in their lives
:/
Monica S, Backroads and MeggyFinn like this.

Wife to DH dh_malesling.GIF(12.10.2009), Anchorage based doula joy.gif, Proud mama to Autumnblahblah.gif (09.03.2008), Sylas bouncy.gif(04.25.2010), angel1.gif(06.11.2012), Callioperainbow1284.gif(04.23.2013)

alaskanmomma is offline  
#9 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 01:17 PM
 
heathernj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think nut free tables are a MUCH better solution. It's not right to ban something for all kids, just because some are allergic.
snguyen and Monica S like this.
heathernj is offline  
#10 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 02:19 PM
 
mmjones's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 9
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

They should be be completely banned when there is a known case of severe allergy. Residues on hands and toys could be deadly to some kids. My daughter reacts to walnut oil on things. I am so scared of the possibility that a child will eat nuts and then touch her or that someone (at school or in a home) will treat their furniture with walnut oil; that would be a nightmare because it would linger a long time and be difficult to find the source. My daughter isn't in school yet, but I know she will go to the school her sister is at currently and they eat a ton of walnuts there. I have hinted that that will need to change when younger sister comes there, but I wonder if I should get more serious about it now even though it is 2 years away. Older daughter is instructed to avoid walnuts so she doesn't bring the residues home. Staff within the school has told me that our state doesn't allow epipens to be held in teachers care, this is crazy to me.

mmjones is offline  
#11 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 03:55 PM
 
heathernj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
NO offense intended, but you CANNOT reasonably expect hundreds of people to change what they do for your kid. If teachers really can't have custody of an epi pen in your state, you probably need to consider homeschooling or getting that regulation changed. You can't cushion your child from the world, and it is unfair of you to expect everyone to change what they do to accomodate her. Now, flame away!
heathernj is offline  
#12 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 04:23 PM
 
mamabear0314's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by heathernj View Post

NO offense intended, but you CANNOT reasonably expect hundreds of people to change what they do for your kid. If teachers really can't have custody of an epi pen in your state, you probably need to consider homeschooling or getting that regulation changed. You can't cushion your child from the world, and it is unfair of you to expect everyone to change what they do to accomodate her. Now, flame away!

Agree.

MoiraMay likes this.

Single, student mama slingboy.gif to 3 boys jumpers.gif 

 

homeschool.gif saynovax.gif signcirc1.gif bfinfant.gif femalesling.GIF familybed2.gif h20homebirth.gif 

mamabear0314 is offline  
#13 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 05:08 PM
 
mcoreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My 4 yr old is allergic to peanuts. So far all of his preschools/daycares have been nut free. It is nice with preschoolers, they are messy eaters after all. The teachers carry his epi-pen. When he starts school next year, nuts are still banned I think but he will need to carry his own epi-pen. His picture will be displayed along with allergen & instruction. I would be nervous about kids younger than 8 in a school where nuts are allowed. Young kids will believe other kids who tell them that this snack is ok even though it isn't.

But I don't necessarily agree with the no nuts policy. Sabrina's Law was passed in Ontario, Canada after a dairy allergic teen died after eating fries at the school cafeteria. She did her homework & was given the ok to eat there. However, she did not tell the server of her allergy & her fries were served with the same utensil as the poutine. Her epi-pen was in her locker.

Now in Ontario all children that have an epi-pen must have it on their person at all times. All staff know who has allergies & how to use an epi-pen & when to use it. Extra epi-pens are available in the school. I know of one child that was saved by this law & she didn't know she was allergic to anything. Luckily her teacher recognized an anaphylactic reaction & acted quickly.

I haven't heard of any schools banning milk.

Living with a nut allergy means learning to deal with disappointment & calculated risks.
lrj85 likes this.
mcoreen is offline  
#14 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 05:17 PM
 
lauren's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2001
Location: In a state of grace
Posts: 6,784
Mentioned: 2 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcoreen 




Now in Ontario all children that have an epi-pen must have it on their person at all times. All staff know who has allergies & how to use an epi-pen & when to use it. Extra epi-pens are available in the school. I know of one child that was saved by this law & she didn't know she was allergic to anything. Luckily her teacher recognized an anaphylactic reaction & acted quickly.

Is it realistic to expect the child to be responsible to have the pen on their person at all times? Wouldn't it be easier to equip the teachers? Seems crazy to leave it up to kids. "Oops well you left your epi pen back in the classroom, guess you are out of luck honey?"


 
lauren is offline  
#15 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 08:13 PM
 
jmarroq's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 303
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 6 Post(s)

Peanut butter is one of those things that can get messy and get smeared easily, so I can understand it being banned (or at the very least, a peanut free table designated) if there is an allergy. I also agree that once a child is old enough to understand their condition and carry an epipen responsibly, the schools should allow peanut butter and other allergens (there are so many!). Middle school would be the youngest...high school would be better. All schools should have back up epipens in the office, and every staff member should be aware of the situation. Hopefully the child will wear a bracelet or something. People don't realize how severe some cases are...just the peanut dust alone can cause someone to react.

 

Sadly, I read of a case of a girl who had a peanut cracker crumbled on her on a school bus and she had to be hospitalized. The kids who did it knew she had an allergy.

Backroads likes this.
jmarroq is offline  
#16 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 08:50 PM
 
rgill0522's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have a 22 year old daughter & I recall the PB allergic kids eating by themselves in a peanut-free room in elementary school. I also recall sending peanut-free treats for her birthday to share. It didn't bother me to do this - and I didn't think much of it.

Last month our 18 month old was diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy. After reading the literature from the doctor about this allergy, I understand the need for peanut-free environments for elementary/preschool children. A peanut allergy is NOT like a seasonal allergy - take some benadryl & get relief. A child without an epinephrine (adrenaline) shot can DIE within minutes after peanut butter exposure - even a minute amount. The parent of a peanut allergic child isn't some hyper, over-reactive spaz who wants special treatment for their little brat...it is ignorant of parents of a non-allergic small child be permitted to eat PB when it could KILL another child. It's PB, not oxygen.

I had to reiterate to our DD grandparents a PB allergy isn't merely a seasonal allergy. The reaction is deadly with PB. I wasn't being over-reactive. It is scary. Our DD could die from PB/PB exposure/PB cross-contamination.

I am sure other parents with PB-allergic children don't look forward to the eye-rolling & negative reactions from parents of classmates. I would suggest parents of non-allergic children get educated before judging. I do know children like to feel helpful & do the right thing. If a parent of a picky eater explained why Susie-Q, or Davey-J, cannot eat/be around PB, maybe they would try another food if it meant keeping their PB-allergic friend safe. Unlike some callous adults, children normally care about each other.

Our DD, my husband nor I did anything, or wanted, this type of life-threatening reaction/allergy to such a simple thing as peanut butter. But we do want our child to feel safe in school, just like every parent.

So to the person who suggested a PB-allergic parent homeschool/get the law changed...use your brain & try to have compassion for a child other than yours. Not eating peanut butter to protect someone's life is reasonable. Your suggestion is not.
rgill0522 is offline  
#17 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 09:28 PM
 
mamabear0314's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgill0522 View Post

I have a 22 year old daughter & I recall the PB allergic kids eating by themselves in a peanut-free room in elementary school. I also recall sending peanut-free treats for her birthday to share. It didn't bother me to do this - and I didn't think much of it.

Last month our 18 month old was diagnosed with a severe peanut allergy. After reading the literature from the doctor about this allergy, I understand the need for peanut-free environments for elementary/preschool children. A peanut allergy is NOT like a seasonal allergy - take some benadryl & get relief. A child without an epinephrine (adrenaline) shot can DIE within minutes after peanut butter exposure - even a minute amount. The parent of a peanut allergic child isn't some hyper, over-reactive spaz who wants special treatment for their little brat...it is ignorant of parents of a non-allergic small child be permitted to eat PB when it could KILL another child. It's PB, not oxygen.

I had to reiterate to our DD grandparents a PB allergy isn't merely a seasonal allergy. The reaction is deadly with PB. I wasn't being over-reactive. It is scary. Our DD could die from PB/PB exposure/PB cross-contamination.

I am sure other parents with PB-allergic children don't look forward to the eye-rolling & negative reactions from parents of classmates. I would suggest parents of non-allergic children get educated before judging. I do know children like to feel helpful & do the right thing. If a parent of a picky eater explained why Susie-Q, or Davey-J, cannot eat/be around PB, maybe they would try another food if it meant keeping their PB-allergic friend safe. Unlike some callous adults, children normally care about each other.

Our DD, my husband nor I did anything, or wanted, this type of life-threatening reaction/allergy to such a simple thing as peanut butter. But we do want our child to feel safe in school, just like every parent.

So to the person who suggested a PB-allergic parent homeschool/get the law changed...use your brain & try to have compassion for a child other than yours. Not eating peanut butter to protect someone's life is reasonable. Your suggestion is not. Grow up!

The same issues can come up at the park. At the store. With any random kid you might encounter. If my kid had an allergy that severe I would definitely homeschool. Can't make the whole world ban nuts.


Single, student mama slingboy.gif to 3 boys jumpers.gif 

 

homeschool.gif saynovax.gif signcirc1.gif bfinfant.gif femalesling.GIF familybed2.gif h20homebirth.gif 

mamabear0314 is offline  
#18 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 09:39 PM
 
rgill0522's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2012
Posts: 3
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am glad my post helped you understand the serious nature of a food allergy, micah_mae_.
rgill0522 is offline  
#19 of 87 Old 11-19-2013, 10:22 PM
 
Backroads's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Location: Washington Terrace, Utah
Posts: 234
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by rgill0522 View Post

I am glad my post helped you understand the serious nature of a food allergy, micah_mae_.


I don't doubt she understands it.  But if I interpreted her point correctly, she simply meant that more often than not the individual and the family must take steps to proactive.

 

According to your post, peanut butter ought to be full-out made extinct. 

 

I found micah's post realistic.  I fully support peanut-free elementary schools, but if it's not available, you must do what you must.  If you worry about your child interacting with an allergen, you need to do what you must to protect your child--keep them at home, for example.


--Breastfeeding----2nd grade Teaching----Cosleeping----Cloth Diapering -- --Bookworm Mom
Backroads is offline  
#20 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 02:38 AM
 
heathernj's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Posts: 17
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
already understood how severe these allergies can be. It is STILL not reasonable for a parent to expect 400 other people to modify their behavior for one kid. What I said is essentially the same thing Micah said. Your kid could run into a peanut ANYWHERE--INCLUDING at a peanut-banned school. What if the kid whose coat hangs next to your daughter's had a handful of peanuts at some outdoor event over the weekend and accidentally left some in his coat pocket, or something similar? It's just not that unlikely. Until a child so severely allergic is old enough to be custodian of her own epi pen, she is much safer at home!
pamelaRRRR and lrj85 like this.
heathernj is offline  
#21 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 07:38 AM
 
Ragana's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Chicago area
Posts: 1,850
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 2 Post(s)

This is an honest question and not meant to be provocative. What do the schools do when there is a severe case of another allergy? - the above-mentioned dairy allergy, shellfish, beestings. I have only heard of schools banning nuts, but not these other things. Maybe those allergies aren't as common as the ones to nuts?


Mom "D" to DD1 "Z" (14) and DD2 "I" (11) DH "M"

Ragana is offline  
#22 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 07:43 AM
 
KSLaura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado
Posts: 485
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Not everyone has the option to homeschool. Some people have to work in order to pay bills or provide health insurance for a child who definately needs it. The public school system is required to provide an education to ALL children, regardless of disabilities/medical problems. There is a program for severly disabled children, where one parent can apply to be a CNA for their own child and collect a paycheck. Most school systems also have a 'homebound' program where teachers will come out a couple of times a week to provide instruction to children who are not able to be in school. I've never heard of these programs being used for allergic children. It would be extremly expensive and a huge financial burden on the school system, and ultimately tax payers.

That being said, I think schools need to provide rules based on the children in attendance at the school. If the child is not 'touch allergic', than peanut butter may be ok as long as it is controlled. If there is a child with a life threatening nut allergy, than perhaps it should be banned either in the classroom or in the entire school.

I don't buy into the whole, 'you could touch peanuts at the playground, store, etc...). When I take my child to the park or store, I am very alert and aware of my environment in a way that a 4 year old could never be. When I drop her off at school, I don't have that kind of control. I have to trust that her teachers and school will keep her safe.

So far, my DD is not 'touch allergic' (luckily!). All of her schools have been very supportive. Her preschool does feed other kids peanut butter, but only after asking me first. DD always gets a peanut free snack. If her allergies were more severe (or progress) they were prepared to provide a 'peanut free' classroom.

So, do I expect 400 kids to 'modify their behavior' for the good of one? If medically necessary to protect someone's life, than yes, I do. Eat peanut butter at home. Bring hummus or something to school.


" rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/familybed2.gif">familybed2.gif  DD1 12/05, DD2 12/08


Computer Engineer- I write better in 1's and 0's. ;-)
KSLaura is offline  
#23 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 08:04 AM
 
lrj85's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I agree with PP who have pointed out the world is not going to care or insulate your child. It just plain won't. My child has a limited amount of food she will eat she is picky I have tried really hard but most days it just isnt a hill I want to die on. She should get to eat peanut butter. If your childs allergy to anything is soooo severe that TRACE amounts will cause them close to immediate death I would suggest homeschooling or another alternative you may have to get creative about finances and sacrifice. Hey no one said everything was fair in parenting either. Before you flame me for not "understanding" I have a severe LATEX allergy. I could stop breathing when a small child runs in to me at the mall with that nifty balloon animal you just got him but werent supervising him with. Do I blame the kid, the clown that made it, the world for having so much damn stuff made out of latex??? NO its my allergy and I do what I need to do to protect myself. My daughter even plays with balloons at her fathers house (just washes her hands before she comes in contact with me). The thing I am pointing out from an early age your child has to be their own best advocate and teaching them that they are a special snowflake and the world should change for them is just not a realistic expectation. Sorry

pamelaRRRR and jess2780 like this.
lrj85 is offline  
#24 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 08:49 AM
 
KSLaura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado
Posts: 485
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by lrj85 View Post

I agree with PP who have pointed out the world is not going to care or insulate your child. It just plain won't. My child has a limited amount of food she will eat she is picky I have tried really hard but most days it just isnt a hill I want to die on. She should get to eat peanut butter. If your childs allergy to anything is soooo severe that TRACE amounts will cause them close to immediate death I would suggest homeschooling or another alternative you may have to get creative about finances and sacrifice. Hey no one said everything was fair in parenting either. Before you flame me for not "understanding" I have a severe LATEX allergy. I could stop breathing when a small child runs in to me at the mall with that nifty balloon animal you just got him but werent supervising him with. Do I blame the kid, the clown that made it, the world for having so much damn stuff made out of latex??? NO its my allergy and I do what I need to do to protect myself. My daughter even plays with balloons at her fathers house (just washes her hands before she comes in contact with me). The thing I am pointing out from an early age your child has to be their own best advocate and teaching them that they are a special snowflake and the world should change for them is just not a realistic expectation. Sorry


 



I don't think the 'world' should have to change for a child. I do, however, expect public school to provide a reasonably safe environent for a small child. If a child has a life-threatening allergy, I would expect schools to act accordingly. Of course parents should teach their kids to be their own advocate. Most allergic kids are well aware of their allergies and what they need to avoid. Like I said before though, a small child may not have the cognitive ability (or even the ability to read) to determine what ingrediants are in food items, or which friends they shouldn't sit next to today, because of their lunch contents.

My kids are picky eaters, too. Its great that I can give my older kid a PB&J, but it really sucks to have to find alternatives for my LO. So far, she seems to like Nutella. smile.gif

Another thing to consider, some children who have a mild allergy can become more severe with repeated exposure. These kinds of allergies can be unpredictable and very difficult to manage.

For some people, there is no amount of creative financing/sacrafice that would allow for homeschooling. Its pretty hard to homeschool your kid if you are homeless. greensad.gif


" rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/familybed2.gif">familybed2.gif  DD1 12/05, DD2 12/08


Computer Engineer- I write better in 1's and 0's. ;-)
KSLaura is offline  
#25 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 08:53 AM
 
mamabear0314's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,260
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 4 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KSLaura View Post

Not everyone has the option to homeschool. Some people have to work in order to pay bills or provide health insurance for a child who definately needs it. The public school system is required to provide an education to ALL children, regardless of disabilities/medical problems. There is a program for severly disabled children, where one parent can apply to be a CNA for their own child and collect a paycheck. Most school systems also have a 'homebound' program where teachers will come out a couple of times a week to provide instruction to children who are not able to be in school. I've never heard of these programs being used for allergic children. It would be extremly expensive and a huge financial burden on the school system, and ultimately tax payers.

That being said, I think schools need to provide rules based on the children in attendance at the school. If the child is not 'touch allergic', than peanut butter may be ok as long as it is controlled. If there is a child with a life threatening nut allergy, than perhaps it should be banned either in the classroom or in the entire school.

I don't buy into the whole, 'you could touch peanuts at the playground, store, etc...). When I take my child to the park or store, I am very alert and aware of my environment in a way that a 4 year old could never be. When I drop her off at school, I don't have that kind of control. I have to trust that her teachers and school will keep her safe.

So far, my DD is not 'touch allergic' (luckily!). All of her schools have been very supportive. Her preschool does feed other kids peanut butter, but only after asking me first. DD always gets a peanut free snack. If her allergies were more severe (or progress) they were prepared to provide a 'peanut free' classroom.

So, do I expect 400 kids to 'modify their behavior' for the good of one? If medically necessary to protect someone's life, than yes, I do. Eat peanut butter at home. Bring hummus or something to school.

So when you go to the park do you wipe down the whole thing with clorox wipes or what? Do you stop every child at the park to find out what they had at lunch that day and if they washed their hands? Not being snarky, I'm honestly curious.


Single, student mama slingboy.gif to 3 boys jumpers.gif 

 

homeschool.gif saynovax.gif signcirc1.gif bfinfant.gif femalesling.GIF familybed2.gif h20homebirth.gif 

mamabear0314 is offline  
#26 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 09:09 AM
 
KSLaura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado
Posts: 485
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My child is not 'touch allergic'. We have peanut butter in our house and at the kids' schools. Little DD does not eat it, and I make sure she doesn't eat anything that contains peanuts. If she was 'touch allergic', we would hopefully have a better relationship with a local allergist and I would be investigating treatments (peanut challenge type stuff). Right now, this isnt' an issue with us. If it becomes an issue, I would asses each situation, and determine the risk/safety index. I would also carry an epi-pen at all times (I already carry inhalers). For severe allergies, maybe skipping the park would be appropriate for a while. I don't know, we're not there yet. At the same time, I would expect the parent/child to be just as concerned with keeping kid safe. This may mean teaching the child to be alert for dangerous food items and taking child to an allergist. I would expect schools to work with me to keep my child safe when I'm not there. The parameters of 'keeping child safe' would and should depend on the individual child's situation. It may mean banning peanut butter from my kid's room for a while (kids eat lunch in the classroom at DD's school) and keeping an epi-pen in the nurse's office. Each kid with health problems at older DD's school has a plan put in place by the school nurse and parents that describes what their child needs and how treatment will be administered. Some kids self-carry epi-pens and inhalers. Some leave them in the office. I'm hoping for some combination of those options when younger DD starts kindergarten next fall.

Its hard to control a whole classroom full of young children. I had one of my girl scouts accidently smear paint in another one's hair last week. Had that been peanut butter with an extremely allergic kid, the results could have been disasterous. I would hate for the non-allergic kid to go through life thinking they were responsible for the death of another child when it could be easily avoided.

Anyway, I am not an advocate of banning peanut butter at all schools. I think it should possibly be banned/limited based on individual kids attending each school. No major peanut allergies=no problem. Peanut allergies=appropriate plan put in place by school officials and parents. smile.gif


" rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/familybed2.gif">familybed2.gif  DD1 12/05, DD2 12/08


Computer Engineer- I write better in 1's and 0's. ;-)
KSLaura is offline  
#27 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 09:15 AM
 
lrj85's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:

I don't think the 'world' should have to change for a child. I do, however, expect public school to provide a reasonably safe environent for a small child. If a child has a life-threatening allergy, I would expect schools to act accordingly. Of course parents should teach their kids to be their own advocate. Most allergic kids are well aware of their allergies and what they need to avoid. Like I said before though, a small child may not have the cognitive ability (or even the ability to read) to determine what ingrediants are in food items, or which friends they shouldn't sit next to today, because of their lunch contents.

My kids are picky eaters, too. Its great that I can give my older kid a PB&J, but it really sucks to have to find alternatives for my LO. So far, she seems to like Nutella. smile.gif

Another thing to consider, some children who have a mild allergy can become more severe with repeated exposure. These kinds of allergies can be unpredictable and very difficult to manage.

For some people, there is no amount of creative financing/sacrafice that would allow for homeschooling. Its pretty hard to homeschool your kid if you are homeless. greensad.gif

Public schools are reasonably safe... I think what we are missing here is the definition of reasonably. I am aware of sensitizing allergens as I said I have one to Latex each exposure is a little worse it sucks it can be limiting. However as PP have pointed out what if they had peanut butter on toast that morning BEFORE school and touch tables chairs backpacks and god knows what else your child will come in contact with? If the allergy is THAT severe then there is NO reasonable things the school can do. If your child's allergy is peanuts another childs is latex another childs is milk and anothers is something else dietary you have effectively eliminated a WHOLE lot of options. The problem is with YOUR kid not everyone else it makes more fiscal sense, not to mention common sense that the collective not be changed for ONE person. I understand how its unfair when that is your child and yes if you are homeless it would be hard to homeschool but I doubt very much the shelter you are in is peanut free dairy free gluten free ect. So it would seem to me there may be bigger issues.

Backroads likes this.
lrj85 is offline  
#28 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 09:36 AM
 
KSLaura's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Colorado
Posts: 485
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I think it would be very rare to have a bunch of kids with severe, life-threatening allergies all in the same class. Like I said before, if a child qualifies (IDK, maybe a child with severe life-threatening touch allergies to A LOT of different things), they may qualify for a homebound schooling program through the school district, and the parent may be able to apply to be a qualified care taker for child. I don't think this is necessary for a child with one allergy to one specific thing.

I have heard of schools requiring kids to wash their hands before entering classrooms (my kids' schools don't do this though). This might be a reasonable accomadation for a severly allergic kid.

I stand by my recommendation of having the parents/school communicate and come up with a plan that is appropriate for the child. There are SEVERAL kids in DD's grade in public school that are allergic to peanuts and other foods. The parents/school officials have determined that it is not necessary to ban peanut butter. If they did make this recommendation, I would respect it, because I trust the school to make the best decisions for all of the kids. I'm guessing most schools operate this way. It would be wrong to ban a food group because one kid has non life-threatening allergy. However, if parents requested that it be banned due to a severe documented allergy (i.e., kid stopped breathing in the past after dust exposure), I would hope that the school would do its best to protect this kid.

BTW, the Americans with Disabilities act requires schools and businesses to make accomadations for people all the time. Wheelchair ramps aren't exactly cheap, and probably aren't in the best interest of the majority of mobile people.
Backroads likes this.


" rel="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/familybed2.gif">familybed2.gif  DD1 12/05, DD2 12/08


Computer Engineer- I write better in 1's and 0's. ;-)
KSLaura is offline  
#29 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 09:50 AM
 
lrj85's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2013
Posts: 82
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by KSLaura View Post

I think it would be very rare to have a bunch of kids with severe, life-threatening allergies all in the same class. Like I said before, if a child qualifies (IDK, maybe a child with severe life-threatening touch allergies to A LOT of different things), they may qualify for a homebound schooling program through the school district, and the parent may be able to apply to be a qualified care taker for child. I don't think this is necessary for a child with one allergy to one specific thing.

I have heard of schools requiring kids to wash their hands before entering classrooms (my kids' schools don't do this though). This might be a reasonable accomadation for a severly allergic kid.

I stand by my recommendation of having the parents/school communicate and come up with a plan that is appropriate for the child. There are SEVERAL kids in DD's grade in public school that are allergic to peanuts and other foods. The parents/school officials have determined that it is not necessary to ban peanut butter. If they did make this recommendation, I would respect it, because I trust the school to make the best decisions for all of the kids. I'm guessing most schools operate this way. It would be wrong to ban a food group because one kid has non life-threatening allergy. However, if parents requested that it be banned due to a severe documented allergy (i.e., kid stopped breathing in the past after dust exposure), I would hope that the school would do its best to protect this kid.

BTW, the Americans with Disabilities act requires schools and businesses to make accomadations for people all the time. Wheelchair ramps aren't exactly cheap, and probably aren't in the best interest of the majority of mobile people.


I believe the language is "reasonable accommodation" for instance if someone that is blind wanted to be a server in a restaurant and expected all furniture in the restaurant to stay EXACTLY the same and provide braille menus as well allow the seeing eye dog in to the kitchen as well as provide someone to carry the servers trays to the table this would for instance not be an example of a business being able to reasonably accommodate that person. My examples of the many allergies pertain the school as a whole one child in class A is allergic substance 1 and child in class B is allergic to substance 2 now substances 1 and 2 are banned from the school. I agree with reasonable accommodations of course however I think school wide bans are not reasonable. Especially when there are people like my ex who ran out of sunbutter and sent out daughter to school with a peanut butter sandwich several times. I am not advocating what he did by any means but you are expecting that all parents CARE about your CHILD which just isnt logical some parents dont even care about their own children

lrj85 is offline  
#30 of 87 Old 11-20-2013, 09:53 AM
 
mcoreen's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 48
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
My child has a limited amount of food she will eat she is picky I have tried really hard but most days it just isnt a hill I want to die on. She should get to eat peanut butter.
So why don't you bring your child home for lunch? If she really will only eat PB. Or she could have her peanut butter for breakfast & supper.

People get so caught up in the no nuts at school rule, it reminds me of the smoking in public debate.

Yes, you can run into PB in the park, the difference is that my child does not go to the park alone. If other kids are having snacks I'm on alert. I've asked family members to wash their hands after eating PB.
No you can't avoid it, it's about calculated risks. I'm not convinced that an outright ban is needed, however, I think it makes it easier for the youngest kids & for the teachers.
It would be hard for one teacher to check every lunch & make sure sharing did not occur, etc. class sizes are 20-30 here with only one teacher. If there's only one peanut allergy child, lunch times would be sad & lonely if confined to a PB table alone.
My son will carry his epi-pen, he knows what it is for. Myself & the teacher will ensure he has it. It's not that difficult with the little epi-pen specific fanny packs - also I know there are extra epi-pens in the office just in case.
My son developed hives after being kissed on the cheek by his dad. His Dad had PB for breakfast, rinsed his face & 10 min later kissed our son. And he has a mild allergy. With PB it can be mild one time but fatal the next. Needless to say, we have a no PB policy in our house.
KSLaura and Backroads like this.
mcoreen is offline  
Reply

Tags
School , Allergies

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off