what's wrong (or right) with charter schools? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 41 Old 01-29-2014, 09:54 PM - Thread Starter
 
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big flap going on now with chicago public schools. which have got to be second only to washington, d.c. -- if at all -- in terms of the nation's worst. chicago's mayor closed a bunch of neighborhood schools and is now set to reopen them as charter schools. is this all bad?

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#2 of 41 Old 01-30-2014, 05:08 AM
 
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What I have heard is that the charters in Chicago do as well as the neighborhood schools or *worse* so. I frankly don't think it's a good solution. But then I don't think for-profit companies should be educating our kids at all.

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#3 of 41 Old 02-01-2014, 09:55 AM
 
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Charter schools can make life a misery for kids they don't want to deal with, either because the child has special needs or has behavior issues. Because of this, it can create an imbalance in the public schools that are left, with a lack of socially appropriate role models for the students and a very burdensome situation for the staff.

 

Charter schools leave the more vulnerable children unprotected. The needs of kids who parents don't speak English, who really need the free lunch program, who can't provide their child transportation to and from school, etc are completely unaddressed by nearly all charter schools.

 

Charters take the easy kids who parents have it at least a little bit together. The mission to provide a free and appropriate education to ALL students with zero reject is ONLY held by public schools. I understand why some parents choose charters, and if I felt the best fit for my own child were a charter, I would enroll them in one. None the less, over all, I don't see the charter model as working toward social justice and equality.

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#4 of 41 Old 02-03-2014, 08:58 AM
 
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Kentucky doesn't have charter schools, so keep in mind that I have zero personal experience with them. Based one what I've read about the success and lack thereof of charter schools, it seems there are a few possible outcomes for them:

 

1) Within a successful school distract, charter schools can provide a good place for kids that don't "fit" in the regular system. This can be accomplished with a project based learning model, an arts focus, etc. This kind of thing can also be accomplished within a public school system with magnet schools, but not all districts are willing or able to do this.

 

2) Within a failing school district, charter schools tend to siphon off the kids whose parents care a lot about their education and have the time to be involved, at the very least in transporting their kids to and from school. This leaves said failing school system even worse off.

 

I think charter schools CAN be part of a healthy publicly funded education system, but only if the main system is working well. It seems unlikely that this will happen in Chicago.

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#5 of 41 Old 02-03-2014, 02:37 PM
 
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Good points. I guess for me the bottom line is that even if they were the best schools in the world, I don't think tax dollars should be going to support for-profit companies in educating kids and creating a second system within the public system. I would rather put the money into improving public schools. But that's another can of worms!

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#6 of 41 Old 02-03-2014, 02:42 PM
 
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An article about the topic from that hippie rag, Forbes ;)

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2013/09/10/charter-school-gravy-train-runs-express-to-fat-city/


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#7 of 41 Old 02-03-2014, 03:09 PM
 
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An article about the topic from that hippie rag, Forbes ;)

 

http://www.forbes.com/sites/greatspeculations/2013/09/10/charter-school-gravy-train-runs-express-to-fat-city/

 

Excellent article from a very reliable source.


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#8 of 41 Old 02-04-2014, 08:06 PM
 
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But are charter schools always run by large corporations? I get the concern. The corporate takeover of public education leaves me really nervous, as well.

But my impression was that they can also be founded by a grassroots coalition of parents. I know of one group of parents trying to start a Waldorf-inspired charter school--no big corporations, just dedicated parents wanting an alternative to the current system. Usually you have to pay a hefty 5-digit price tag for a full-day Waldorf education. Efforts like this make if available to everybody, not just those you can afford it.

Test scores are not a mountain to die on for me, so I really don't care if charter school students tend to score lower on all of the NCLBish stuff.

I watched Waiting for Superman, (mixed feelings on that film, but I won't derail the thread about them), and this school was featured in the DVD extras: http://millermccoy.org/index.jsp

I don't know if private corporations have their dirty fingerprints all over it, or if it's grassroots and parent-led. I do know that it serves primarily underprivileged teens. I also know that if I were living in poverty in New Orleans, I'd be really tempted to enroll my sons there. I could see where, IF DONE WELL AND CORRECTLY, charter schools could provide a way up and out for low-income kids and teens.

I cannot speak to the workability of charter schools in Chicago, and I think some fair criticisms have been raised in this thread. But with the right checks, balances, and reforms, I think a charter school system actually has great potential. I can see a lot of sides to this issue dizzy.gif
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#9 of 41 Old 02-04-2014, 08:27 PM
 
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In my tiny corner of the world, charter schools are run by dictator-like individuals.  One school, which has three completely separate campuses spread across town, was started by a woman who owned a semi-Montessori pre-school.  She wanted somewhere for her students to matriculate, ostensibly to keep control over them.  It's a very high performing school wrt test scores but it's run like a police state and after 4 years there, my son needed to be deschooled for a year before he could go to the neighborhood school.

 

After a year of that, we gave charters another go.  The next school had been started by the city.  It's sole mission: relieve overcrowding.  It was an amazing school which closed after a few years due to a local major employer laying off thousands.  People fled the area and enrollment tanked.  The district rescinded the charter over the summer and we were devastated.

 

Next year the kiddos went to yet another charter school.  It's ds2's 3rd year there and we HATE it.  The school was founded by one woman, who clearly has an agenda.  She can't keep a principal or any decent teachers for more than a semester or two.  She forbids the formation of a PTA/PTO.  Her faculty is full of convicted drug offenders...they are so appreciative of their jobs, no one else would hire them...she has them under her thumb.  She hand-picks her support staff from among her family and friends and discourages volunteers from spending too much time on campus during the school day.  Ds will probably leave after this year, most likely to do virtual school...which of course is a charter school but as it is not the expression of one individual's personal agenda, we should be fine!


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#10 of 41 Old 02-04-2014, 08:40 PM
 
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Linda, not trying to pick on you, but I think your comments reflect some common views that, in my experience, just aren't necessarily true. My 7th grader is at a charter school (6th-12th grade). It is non-profit and managed by a local board of directors which is elected by the parents.

 

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Originally Posted by Linda on the move View Post
 

Charter schools can make life a misery for kids they don't want to deal with, either because the child has special needs or has behavior issues. Because of this, it can create an imbalance in the public schools that are left, with a lack of socially appropriate role models for the students and a very burdensome situation for the staff.

 

I am sure that this CAN happen, but it is very far from the reality of charter schools in my area. My dd1's charter has a population of kids, who for whatever reason, don't find public school to be a good fit, or find the charter school to be a better fit. Many of the kids at her school have IEPs for ADHD, dyslexia, discalculia, aspergers and milder forms of autism (can cope with the school work, but have significant social issues). I know prior to our arrival there used to be a student with Downs there who competed in the Special Olympics. There are not  profoundly physically disabled kids or profoundly mentally disabled kids in the current student population. The school does have a special education coordinator, but I think profoundly affected kids would get better services in a different school. The school population is by no means all "easy" kids, however. There is also another charter school in our area that specializes in helping kids with more intense special needs such as Downs and offers a lot of vocational services.

 

Charter schools leave the more vulnerable children unprotected. The needs of kids who parents don't speak English, who really need the free lunch program, who can't provide their child transportation to and from school, etc are completely unaddressed by nearly all charter schools.

 

Our school does not provide free lunch or transportation. However there are charter schools in our area that do provide free and reduced lunch and do provide bus transportation. Our school has carpools set up and can usually make sure that kids who need rides can get them. Our school does offer foreign language instruction, but not ESL. However other charter schools in the area do offer ESL. 

 

Charters take the easy kids who parents have it at least a little bit together. The mission to provide a free and appropriate education to ALL students with zero reject is ONLY held by public schools. I understand why some parents choose charters, and if I felt the best fit for my own child were a charter, I would enroll them in one. None the less, over all, I don't see the charter model as working toward social justice and equality.

 

In our state charters are not allowed to reject a child. I'll agree that the parents need to be a little bit together to apply to the charter in the first place! I'm in North Carolina. Here charters are regulated by the State Board of Education and are under state law. Here is an excerpt from the FAQ on the state charter school website, note that they are required to provide special education services:

 

http://www.ncpublicschools.org/charterschools/faqs/

What is a charter school?
Charter schools provide parents a choice in the education of their children -- and it is a public choice. Public tax dollars are the primary funding sources for charter schools. Local, state, and federal dollars follow the child to a charter school. The schools have open enrollment with no discrimination, no religious associations, and no tuition.

How do you enroll in a charter school?
Parents must contact each individual school to see if they have openings. If they have more applicants than available slots, an open lottery must be instituted to fill the remaining spots. For a list of schools, please visit www.ncpublicschools.org/charterschools/schools/.

How much does it cost to attend a charter school?
Charter Schools are tuition free. They are public schools and funding for the schools come from federal, state, and local taxes.

Do charter schools serve students with disabilities?
Yes. Since charter schools are public schools, they must provide special education and related services to all eligible students. For futher information please read the following documentation.

 

 

My child is in a charter because she has unlabled special needs, including anxiety, and needed a smaller environment. We've been really happy with it. I would be happy for my dd2 to go to the same school or to go to our local middle school. She is currently in our local elementary school. We love it too.


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#11 of 41 Old 02-04-2014, 09:24 PM
 
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In our state charters are not allowed to reject a child.

 

They aren't allowed to reject children here, either, but they make the parents miserable and refuse to the meet the needs of the kids until the student is withdrawn.

 

Charters are very diverse, and I didn't say that that ALL charters are a specific way, but I have experience with charters here, and I'm not talking out my arse. :wink  What I'm saying is true for MANY charters. The OP wanted to know what was wrong with them, so I listed some of the problems. These aren't things I'm just repeating or making up. This is how it works in my city. (I work with special needs students in a Title 1 school with a large percentage of ELLs).

 

As I said, if the best placement for my own child were a charter, I would put them there. None the less, I think that defending the charter school movement is thin ground to stand on. Many charter schools are not operated in the public's best interests.


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#12 of 41 Old 02-05-2014, 05:26 AM
 
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My BIL teaches at a really cool grassroots/parent-started charter in another state, so I know they exist, but the ones in Chicago are not.


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#13 of 41 Old 02-05-2014, 07:31 AM
 
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Well, I'm not talking out of my arse either! :wink I think you presented a very limited view of what goes on in your specific area. In my limited view of my specific area — I had 4 different local charters in mind when I wrote my post — it is NOT like the picture you painted. I have heard that there are problems with charters in other areas of the country, but I haven't personally heard of any of those kinds of issues with the charters in our neck of the woods. Bottom line — I think charters can be great for all kids when run well; I think they can be cr@ppy when run poorly. 

 

No child has been run out of my kid's charter school for behavior issues (although if a student brought a weapon to school or similarly violated the school code he or she would be expelled). My kid's school is more likely to have the kids who have been run out of the traditional public schools for not being able to sit still and pay attention.

 

To expand on what's right with the charter than my dd1 goes to and why we like it.

 

• The number one reason we like it is that it's small. Our traditional public schools are great, but the middle school alone is over 700 kids. At my dd1's charter school total enrollment is right at 200 kids for middle and high school combined. The student to teacher ratio is very good and rarely more than 14:1. My dd1 suffers with anxiety so a smaller school environment really helps with that. The large school, while really excellent for a traditional public middle school, just felt overwhelming to her.

 

• It is also a more flexible environment. The small size makes it easy for the teachers and administration to make accommodations and meet kids where they are. There are a lot of quirky kids there and it's not a problem to have a little more time on a test even w/o an IEP. 

 

• They have the opportunity to make use of the natural environment in ways that a traditional school couldn't. The school is located in a small village on a river. They use the river all the time in natural science studying organisms and processes that go on. They can just walk down to the river. They hike in the woods. They canoe for PE.

 

• They have a great environmental science program which is one of dd1's areas of interest. She really connects with her science teacher and loves his hands on approach.

 

• It's easy as a parent to get involved and to meet all the teachers and administration.

 

• It's a very nurturing environment.

 

• It's an "Honor School of Excellence" fwiw. The local charter high schools in our area usually do quite well on those "best high schools in the US" lists. The one I'm most familiar with outside of the one my dd1 attends ranks in the top 5 in "college readiness" on one of those lists. This is the charter that does provide bus transportation for its students, also.

 

The cons are because it's small it's not able to offer the depth and breadth of electives that our traditional public middle and high schools offer and it does not have the monetary resources that our local public schools have through their PTA funds and local tax base. 


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#14 of 41 Old 02-05-2014, 09:29 PM
 
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Well, I'm not talking out of my arse either! :wink I think you presented a very limited view of what goes on in your specific area. . 

 

I didn't imply that you are. However, you said:

 

"Linda, not trying to pick on you, but I think your comments reflect some common views that, in my experience, just aren't necessarily true."

 

You pretty much said that I'm talking out my arse. :wink

 

The concerns I expressed are true, they are true where I live and have been brought up in national media because they are true lots of places. When you defend "charter schools" in general, you are defending a whole big thing with some very ugly sides. I get that you are very happy with the charters where you live, but you really are defending an entire movement based on "a very limited view of what goes on in your specific area" (to use your own words).

 

Also, my view of what goes on in my area isn't "very limited." It is well informed and researched from a wide variety of perspectives.

 

If you understood what is going on in charters around the country, I doubt you would defend the movement even though the best placement for your child happens to be a charter. The only way any one can defend the movement is to pretend that some very ugly truths just aren't true. You went so far as to say that I was stating "common views" that "aren't necessarily true" to justify your position. That's a logical fallacy -- you are pretending that the truth is other than it is because the truth hurts your argument.

 

 

 


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#15 of 41 Old 02-06-2014, 08:20 AM
 
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Linda, I DID NOT say you were talking out of your arse — those were your words, not mine. I have nothing but respect for you as a member of the mothering community. I wanted to present the other side of the story, though, because the view you presented was one-sided, whether it was based on personal experience (my assumption, and I apologize if that was wrong, but you did say but "I have experience with charters here" and "this is how it works in my city") or years of research. It is definitely not the whole story of charter schools.  Charter schools in my area aren't at all like what you described and I think I was very upfront in owning that my view is based on my personal experience with the charter school my child attends and my observations of and experiences with other charter schools in my area, but I have read about the impact of charter schools nationally as well.

 

There are great charters elsewhere in the country, too, not only in my little corner of the world. There are successful charters in California that do amazing work to  reach out to kids in need. They also offer free and reduced lunch programs, special education, communication in Spanish and other languages . The Environmental Charter Middle and High Schools in Inglewood CA are examples ( http://ecmsinglewood.org and http://ecsonline.org ) of charter schools I have heard good things about from a teacher I trust who has taught in title 1 schools in NYC and taught school in NC, Washington DC and California. These schools clearly communicate with parents in Spanish as well as English (a letter to parents in Spanish is right there on the website), and offer a free and reduced lunch program. 

 

Do I think charter schools are the savior of public education in this country? No. Do I think they're the death knell for public education in this country? No, again. I think there are good charter schools out there doing good work in ways that traditional public schools can't. And I do think that charter schools can work alongside a robust traditional public school system, as Kentuckymom mentioned upthread. That's what's going on in my neck of the woods. I have no love for for-profit charter schools run by corporations and I was appalled when one applied for a charter in my area. They were unable to get it off the ground, though.

 

I don't know if charters will be the answer for Chicago or not, but if you're at rock bottom you'll grab onto anything to try to pull yourself up. I think white flight to the suburbs and subsequent re-segration has hurt a lot of places. I am in favor of busing, actually, to level the playing field racially and economically, although that's not a popular view currently. I couldn't begin to tell you how to fix Chicago's schools, though. Are charter schools part of the solution? I don't know. They seem to have achieved some success in Los Angeles and New Orleans and from where Chicago is sitting right now, that probably looks pretty good.


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#16 of 41 Old 02-06-2014, 01:30 PM
 
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My kids go to a charter school that performs at the same level as the best in the city, in the most affluent areas where people with other choices choose to send their kids to school AND fundraise a lot for the school. The difference is that our school is very diverse in terms of language and has 30% free lunch. I think a diverse school makes a big difference in what a school can achieve as well as if the kids are there by CHOICE. You get a very, very different set of parents and those parents are really engaged. They were the parents (even with poor English, very low income) who got their kids enrolled in a good Head Start program. They find a way to get their 50 hours of volunteer time without asking. They are mostly two parent households. The results are very different when a previously failing school is taken over by a bigger charter operation. It can be successful (like KIPP which is totally rote) or a total failure. 

 

Our charter was started college friends of Ivy League, many from our preschool Underpaid, over educated, can't afford private and don't want an entirely rich/white experience anyway. Diversity was a key goal. The school has now expanded a bit but it just great.

 

My mom just retired as a pubic school teacher and of course doesn't like charters. But when she saw the test scores of our home school she said anything better. And she has been DELIGHTED with the school as a whole, especially after she found out the teachers had 401k deposits. =)

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#17 of 41 Old 02-06-2014, 07:53 PM
 
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My DC attended two charter schools (one in CA and one in MD). I vote "it's complicated". I do not think for-profit schools should be allowed and they aren't in my state (I don't think).  Our district seems to be based off of NYC public schools. Before that, our district was also really struggling and the residents who could afford other options took them. Until charters came along. School choice, which now includes charters, innovative schools, magnet schools and etc, is a reality for grades 6-12. And, it feels like real choice. Kids in my city take the bus for free after 6th grade and all student receive a big packet with school descriptions when they are in 5th grade. I think this is a good thing and embracing charters was the start of this for our city. 

 

Some of the problems I see with charters are with retaining teachers, or if schools manage to retain them being able to offer them a career with a lot of growth. I'd like to see our charter system pay average teacher salaries so that charter teachers can seek advanced degrees and etc. w/o pricing them out of the charter's budget. 

 

As far as closing neighborhood schools and replacing them with charters. I'll vote "yes" that's bad. Because, IME, the successful charters are started by community members who have a vision for their area and for their students. These things need to evolve naturally. Unless we're describing a charter that just happens to have evolved and is ready to take over a space and start educating students, I can't see how just contracting some independent group to take over a student body is going to meet the needs of a closed school any better than some minor adjustments from the board, yk?  The only schools that I can imagine being in a good place to do that are those franchises (like KIPP, which I don't know much about) or for-profit, which just seems so wrong to me. 

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#18 of 41 Old 02-06-2014, 08:08 PM
 
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Linda, are charter schools in your area not required to offer the same FARMs benefits to kids who choose charter schools?  I think all of ours are. Transportation is still an issue for K-5 though. 


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#19 of 41 Old 02-06-2014, 08:59 PM
 
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My DD's school is actively trying to increase it's economic diversity to better reflect it's urban community. They were a pilot school for the state this year. They were the first charter school to be allowed to add economic priority to the admissions lottery. I think they were at 15% this year, and the goal is to increase that up to 40% over the next few years. It's risky in today's education climate but important to the mission of the school. The school is year-round, which makes things complicated for some families, but there are school and community options. The school doesn't have a cafeteria, so it doesn't have a lunch program. However, they have a caterer provide lunches for those childbed eligible for free or reduced meals. They just don't get reimbursed for them by the government. They are actually quite good and much healthier than I would have expected. The school doesn't provide transportation. They have chosen to put that money into teacher salaries and staff development. There is little turnover. The teachers aren't school district employees but are part of the state retirement system and get state health benefits.
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#20 of 41 Old 02-06-2014, 09:00 PM
 
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Linda, are charter schools in your area not required to offer the same FARMs benefits to kids who choose charter schools?  I think all of ours are. Transportation is still an issue for K-5 though. 

 

Charters in our area are not required to provide a prepared lunch at all. Many don't. Kids bring their lunches.

 

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Originally Posted by JudiAU View Post
 

You get a very, very different set of parents and those parents are really engaged. They were the parents (even with poor English, very low income) who got their kids enrolled in a good Head Start program. They find a way to get their 50 hours of volunteer time without asking. They are mostly two parent households.

 

That's similar to what I was saying. The difference is that I care about what happens to the other children, the ones whose parents aren't engaged, aren't educated, are in prison, don't speak English, are living in generational poverty, have substance abuse problems etc.

 

BTW, I work with special needs kids in a Title One school with a large percentage of language learners. My professional life is about those kids. 

 

I think this is a different issue if you only care about your own children.

 

(BTW, one of the kiddos from my school left this year to attend a charter, and now she is back. She has special needs, and she lasted less than a semester at a charter. They didn't want to meet her messy and complicated needs, so she is back in her neighborhood public school)


but everything has pros and cons  shrug.gif

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#21 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 07:06 AM
 
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In my experience, I like them in a general sense.  Utah, at least my area of the state, is full of them. Some are company-founded, but there are just as many if not more of the grassroots type.  I came from teaching in the traditional public sector myself and like that system, but I do admire the diversity of charter schools and the choice it gives parents.

 

I suppose the key is to be wise and to study the schools you're considering, whether they be traditional public, charter, or private.  I don't think the school's category in and of itself determines the school's worthy.

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#22 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 07:26 AM
 
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Another point - maybe I'm too jaded from living in Illinois and seeing Chicago politics up close, but I think here part of the aim is union busting. Charter school teachers are not members of the teachers' union (at least in Chicago). Some of them have unionized separately.

 

http://www.aftacts.org/charter-news/152-unions-move-in-at-chicago-charter-schools-and-resistance-is-swift

 

Full disclosure - my Dh is a teacher and union rep. There is plenty that could be changed and improved about the union, but I don't think throwing the whole concept out is the answer.


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#23 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 11:27 AM
 
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I live in a super small area where there are 3 charter schools in the immediate and outlying areas. None are run by for profit corporations and is instead run by a parent council that changes every couple or so years.

The three have very distinct characteristics and displays both what @beanma and @Linda on the move have experienced.

My son goes to one of the 2 that offers bussing, free and reduced lunches and does not "cherry pick" the kids. The only caveat is that if you live outside the area of service, then you bring your child to school. I live 17 miles away so I bring my child to school. We have our share of special needs students, students with individual service providers (behavioral stuff), low income families and we have tutors.

The other charter on the other hand, while not allowed to refuse enrollment, somehow is allowed to deny enrollment when they don't adhere to a behavior contract. Bussing isn't offered and neither are hot lunches in general (so free and reduced lunch is out). They also "strongly encourage" kindergarteners to be 6 years old. Anyone whose child is 5 and meaning to enroll in kindergarten is counseled and advised to wait until the child is 6. BUT, they ace nationwide assessments and they learn their stuff 1-1.5 years in advance. However, if your child doesn't fit their "norm" (be it special needs or your child being gifted), it is not the place for you. They won't say it outright but when you ask what services are available, they say that their curriculum addresses that already. We all know that there is no curriculum that fits all. So you either stay in misery or you leave. That's how the cherry picking happens in a legal way.

So... I'm torn about charter schools. I've seen it succeed and be an awesome school for kids but I also see how it can be abused.

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#24 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 05:11 PM
 
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BTW- Our school has an innovative whole food lunch program ($5/per day to $0 for free lunch); produce year round from the farmer's market. Last year we raised more than $100k in a fancy fundraiser to renovate the schools kitchen so it can be reopened. Lunch is integrated into the garden and kitchen classroom element.

 

Entrance is lottery based, no priority, except for 5%of seats to founding families and some staff. Kids with a wide range of special needs are accommodated. 

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#25 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 05:39 PM
 
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It sounds to me like so much of this is district relative.

 

For instance, our charter teachers are union members but there are issues with charters having to pay actual salaries, which I worry stifles the mobility of teachers because they are so aware of their beloved school's budget. We also have some schools that have very strict rule for admission. But these rules are not allowed to influence who gets accepted -- but they can influence who chooses to send their kid to that school. For instance, we have a college prep 6-12 all girls schools with very high standards for tardiness, attendance, homework and parent participation. It's also in an area that is difficult to get to (downtown, lots of traffic, no parking).  Their requirements were a deterrent to our DC going here but I've got to say that I'm glad the school is there for our city's kids.

 

I think when we see inequity it is hard to not notice where it is magnified by certain policy but the core issue is the inequity. 

 

I have been in at least half of our many charter schools I can say with certainty that none of them started to serve the privileged kids - to the contrary. Not all are able to meet every kids needs, that's true but many meet most kids needs (including students with special needs) better than those kid's other options. 

 

I wonder how everyone feels about magnet programs?  These have some similar consequences but magnet programs have been embraced in my district for like a 170 years. 


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#26 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 05:42 PM
 
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Oh, and I also wanted to say that not all charter in my city are non-zone. Some are zone school or zone preferential.  I do think the situation where a kids can't attend a charter school that's right across the street from their house because the school is lottery is pretty sucky. There are other negatives I see to lottery systems in terms of neighborly issues. 


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#27 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 08:56 PM
 
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Charter schools are non-profit, public schools.  

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#28 of 41 Old 02-07-2014, 09:28 PM
 
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Charter schools are public but may be for profit or non profit, it depends in the state.
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#29 of 41 Old 02-08-2014, 05:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by swimama View Post
 

Charter schools are non-profit, public schools.  

In some states that is true but some states allow for-profit schools. For-profit schools (like for-profit prisons - how's that for inflammatory :p) are not something I'm in favor of. If a district can't budget and support traditional schools, they should go out and scalp those for-profit models or at least sub-contract. There's something about the direct for-profit model that just irks me. Does anyone have a list of states that allow for-profit schools?  I know I've seen that somewhere.  For the OP, it would be very interesting to know if IL is on that list. 


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#30 of 41 Old 02-08-2014, 05:46 AM
 
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All in all I think it is a very good idea for parents to be involved with their child's education. Parents who are "disengaged" and not participatory at all are the major concern.

It would be interesting to try to create the one-room school system where all ages were put in-to a bunch and children brought their own lunch to school. No bus system at the time of one-room school.

Seems that charter school is trying to create the one-room school with a "modern twist."

If the charter school is trying to recreate the one-room school, it should have a classical emphasis and leave the commercialized stuff out. Education is not commercialization. That is one of the big reasons we home-educate. Although I have seen some big commercialized stuff in home-education too. That's kind of disturbing especially if it is considered "christian" material.

Is the K12.com public education similar to charter school? There are not any charter schools around here, though smaller districts are closing in our small-town area. I have heard that K12.com and connectionsaccademy.com is more popular in usage around our area where districts are small.
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