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#1 of 7 Old 12-05-2001, 10:53 AM - Thread Starter
 
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In discussing different choices in education, my DH asked if I had any statistics for how children in different "alternative" schools compared to public schooled kids. I can find lots of info on how homeschool (my ultimate goal) compares, but nothing yet on Waldorf, Montessori, Reggio Emilia, etc. Can anyone point me in a direction to find sources for this kind of info?

Statistical studies are NOT my style, but DH doesn't buy into the "it just FEELS like the right thing" argument.

wren
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#2 of 7 Old 12-14-2001, 07:47 PM
 
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Hhhmmmm...I'm sure there are stats of various sorts out there. I would try an internet search and then go to the libarary for a professional-journal based search. Most libraries contain a data base of professional journals (education journals, etc.) and their articles, and then you can either read these articles if full-text is available online, or you can order copies of the articles. Ask your librarian. You might want to keep in mind, though, that educational "testing" that will result in statistical data is always controversial. It can be controversial because of the cultural biases often found in testing methods, or because tests can't really accurately tell us valuable information such as how creatively a person thinks, or because tests often show nothing more than how well a child takes a test, etc. The good news is that professional journals often also discuss weaknesses found in testing methods (though they don't always leave room for discussion of controversy).

Let us know what you come up with.

Sierra
P.S. After I read my response I realized that I was only thinking of educational tests. Other statistics that might prove interesting would be, for example, stastical analysis of adult employment rates or community involvement, etc.

I'm pro-adoption reform, but not anti-adoption.
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#3 of 7 Old 01-09-2002, 01:55 AM
 
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I'm doing a newpaper article on cooperative schools, came across this & thought of you
Please let me know if you come across anyone who's involved in parent-run schools.
We are, and I can tell you that my ds and dd are 100% happier with their mama working there than if I dropped them off & ran!!

http://data1.cde.ca.gov/dataquest]statistics[/URL]
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#4 of 7 Old 01-14-2002, 10:59 PM
 
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here's some things I found in a search of ERIC:

Author :
Glenn, Christopher M.
Title :
The Longitudinal Study (LAS): Thirteen Year Follow-Up.
Description :
65
Notes :
For Seven-Year Follow-up report, see ED 370 679. For Ten- Year Follow-up report, see ED 403 013.
Available from EDRS in paper and microfiche.
RIENOV1999
This study is the fifth assessment in an 18-year longitudinal study begun in 1986 to follow a group of
Montessori students who attended the Franciscan Montessori Earth School in Portland, Oregon.
Participating were 45 students with an average age of 18 years, about half of whom were in high school
and half in college. Students completed an online survey focusing on psychological, social, and vocational
issues. The study postulated two hypotheses: (1) the number of Montessori Education Years (MEY)
would positively relate to qualities emphasized in Montessori education; and (2) participants with any
Montessori education would be at least as successful as the general population. Findings provided
considerable support for the first hypothesis, tempered by drop-out sample bias, in terms of life-long
learning and self-development. The personal value of life-long learning was identified as most prevalent
among students with 10-15 MEY. The striving for self-development was manifested by a strong desire
for self-understanding, general personality development, self-direction and discipline, and a strong
positive attitude toward social-interactive activities. Evidence that participants with 10-15 and 3-5 MEY
were more similar in comparison to participants with 6-9 MEY suggests that the most important factor is
a natural predisposition toward a Montessori-compatible lifestyle. The evidence supporting the second
hypothesis was strong, with some negative effects reported. (Nine appendices include comments from
participants regarding career-oriented volunteer and paid experience, educational philosophy, maximizing
the ability to learn, and projective stories. A copy of the online survey is also included.) (KB)
EDRS Price MF01/PC03 Plus Postage.


#####
Author :
Hanson, Peter
Title :
What Happens "After" Montessori? What Parents, Students, and Teachers Believe about the Success of
Former Montessori Elementary Students in Junior High School.
Appears in :
Montessori Life (ISSN: 1054-0040) v10 n4 p45-47 Fall 1998
Notes :
CIJJUN99
Examined the opinions of students, parents, and teachers regarding the transition from a Montessori
elementary school to a junior high school. Found that almost all the Montessori students made a smooth
transition to junior high and were well-prepared. All three groups rated former Montessori students
above average on all measures of success in junior high. (Author/KB)


#####
Author :
Roemer, Kathy
Title :
Outcome-Based Education and Montessori Schools.
Appears in :
Montessori Life (ISSN: 1054-0040) v10 n4 p38-41 Fall 1998
Notes :
CIJJUN99
Examined the learner outcomes used in seven public K-12 schools and six Montessori PreK-6 schools,
which were using outcome-based education models. Found that student use of cognitive, social, and
personal skills were common to both types of programs. Cognitive issues were the top priority for public
schools, and personal skills were ranked first for the Montessori sample. (KB)

#####

Author :
Glenn, Christopher M.
Title :
The Longitudinal Assessment Study (LAS): Cycle 4 (Ten Year) Follow-Up.
Description :
85; 1
Notes :
85p.
Available from EDRS in paper and microfiche.
RIEMAY97
This study is the fourth in a series of assessments of Montessori education intended to answer parent
concerns about the Montessori method's ability to prepare students for the real world. Begun in 1986, the
study will last 18 years, surveying every 3 years participants recruited from lower and upper elementary
classes of the Franciscan Montessori Earth School (Portland, Oregon). This assessment was the first to
include adult participants, over age 18. Younger students and their parents and teacher completed a
survey, and students completed a personality measure and achievement tests; adult participants
completed an expanded "College and Work Edition" survey, while a college professor survey was
administered in place of a teacher survey; the parent survey was omitted for these subjects. The study
postulated two hypotheses: (1) the number of Montessori Education Years (MEY) would positively
relate to those qualities emphasized in Montessori education, such as cooperation with peers; and (2)
participants with any Montessori education would be at least as successful as the general population.
Results found minimal support for the first hypothesis; the second hypothesis received considerable
support. Participants were described as normal or healthy, and achievement test results were above the
average for the general population. (Eight appendices include comments volunteered by parents and
teachers, and adjectives used by parents and teachers to describe the children. The LAS survey
instruments are attached.) (EV)
EDRS Price - MF01/PC04 Plus Postage.


that's montessori. I'll check some others next
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#5 of 7 Old 01-14-2002, 11:06 PM
 
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Author :
Ogletree, Earl J.
Title :
International Survey of the Status of Waldorf Schools.
Description :
198
Notes :
Available from EDRS in paper and microfiche.
RIEJUL2000
This international survey study was the first to examine the Waldorf School movement worldwide and
focused on the teaching practices, curricula, educational outcomes, and positive program features of
Waldorf schools, as well as problems encountered by Waldorf staff. The role of Rudolf Steiner's
philosophy, anthroposophy, and its esoteric aspects were examined in relation to its teaching processes
and its influence on students. Data were collected by means of surveys of 520 Waldorf schools in 31
countries. The response rate was 45 percent. Findings indicated that 57 percent of respondents felt that
the goal of Waldorf education was to change society. Seventy-four percent thought that teachers'
knowledge and implementation of Steiner's educational ideas and methods were good. Over 80 percent
of respondents indicated that their school program included the following practices: balanced school day,
a continuous teacher from grades 1 to 8, student-written and illustrated notebooks, meditation/prayer at
the beginning of the day, form drawing in grades 1 to 5, and teaching of main lesson. Sixty-three percent
described the working climate as democratic, and 67 percent reported that faculty morale was good.
Over 80 percent thought that a Waldorf education was compatible with the times. About 90 percent
thought a Waldorf education developed free thinking individuals. Seventy percent thought that Waldorf
education influenced students to be open to the spiritual world and Anthroposophy. Almost half the
schools were founded by parents. Major issues identified as affecting at least 40 percent of the
respondents' schools included financial support, school location, and student discipline problems. (Results
are summarized and also presented for 19 individual countries or continents. Contains 63 references.)
(KB)

#####
Author :
Ogletree, Earl J.
Title :
The Comparative Status of the Creative Thinking Ability of Waldorf Education Students: A Survey.
Description :
12; 1
Notes :
12p.
Available from EDRS in paper and microfiche.
RIEMAR97
Waldorf Education, founded by Rudolf Steiner in 1919, is based on the philosophy of critical idealism, in
which teachers assist in the natural unfolding of children's preexistent possibilities. But because there has
been little research on Waldorf Education, few data have been gathered on the effectiveness of its
teaching methods and organizational structure, or on students achievement. An international study was
conducted to determine if there was a significant difference between the creative thinking ability of
Waldorf students and state school students in England, Scotland, and Germany. The hypothesis was that
disparate educational practices in Waldorf and state schools were influenced by disparate educational
philosophies. The sample consisted of 1,165 third through sixth grade children--479 English, 193 Scottish,
and 493 German students. The findings obtained from administration of the Torrance Test of Creative
Thinking Ability, suggested that Waldorf students were more creative than their state school peers.
Particular credit for this was given to the maturational-readiness and nurturing curriculum of the Waldorf
Schools, which includes: having the same teacher follow students from grades 1 to 8; de-emphasis on
academic performance in early grades; use of art in instruction; and other teaching and curriculum
considerations. (Contains 20 references.) (BGC)
EDRS Price - MF01/PC01 Plus Postage.
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#6 of 7 Old 01-14-2002, 11:14 PM
 
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you also might want to take a look at a book called
"The Parents Guide to Alternatives in Education" by Ronald Koetzsch.

I didn't notice any statsitcs in it. but after the chapter on each approach it lists contacts. I'm sure the associaitons affilited with the various methods might be able to help you find more info.
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#7 of 7 Old 01-15-2002, 10:35 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Wow! This is great. Thanks for the info and the book tip, rsps!

Mountain, if you're still interested, I have contact info from a local parent cooperative school:
There is the Twin Cities Learning Coop that has a list of
classes offered by parents. As long as you offer one, you can attend others. For further info, contact Kim Hayward at 651 767-0267.
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