so.. what's the bad stuff about montessory? - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
Old 09-07-2004, 03:32 AM
 
alwayslearning2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We are afraid of loosing money because of the tuition contract... if we pull him out,
We would be giving up our only money to buy montessori materials for him to use at will at home!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
for those who pulled thier kids out, how did you get out of the tuition contract??????????????
alwayslearning2 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 09-07-2004, 03:38 AM
 
alwayslearning2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 85
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Does anyone else's school say that no-pullups, even for the first days, they said to bring three changes of clothes, that the other 2 yr 6 monthsolds would have accidents as well, isn't this degrading in a room with 2 1'2 - 6 year olds?
alwayslearning2 is offline  
Old 09-08-2004, 02:25 AM
 
babyj's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: NO CA
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Isn't the beauty of M letting the child develop at their own pace? The no pullups rule sounds a bit like forcing potty training. However, I do know that some M educators value "natural" materials (infants at the M school DS attends (he's almost 3) wear cloth diapers while in care of the school). I also think that sometimes M educators may think that parents can hinder their child by not allowing them the opportunity to potty learn. During the summer my son declared that he no longer wore diapers. We had no choice but to put him in underwear. We just sent lots of extra clothes. He didn't seem bothered by the accidents (we were!). His M teacher assured us that accidents are part of learning. We were somewhat relieved when he came home and reported that "Ben peed on the floor today". We thought "whew, he's not the only kid peeing on the floor". However, it was his choice not to wear underwear. I'm not sure if I could agree with the school's declaration. Are there any other parents you can talk to about this at the school?

Take care,

b
babyj is offline  
Old 09-08-2004, 02:34 AM
 
babyj's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: NO CA
Posts: 115
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
We are afraid of loosing money because of the tuition contract...

Will they keep the money on hand in case you want to try again next year? At our school the money stays with the school but you can re-enroll at a later time if you withdraw early.

Is your son crying when you leave or later? Have you asked the director if you can stay? 2&1/2 seems very young to ask to enter a new place w/o their parent. Have you ever just gone into the room and sat quitely on the floor by the door? (I've done it). My personal rule is that my son doesn't cry without me or DH. Just like when he was an infant. If leaving him requires crying then I'm not leaving. One thing that helped us was saying I'll stay for 5 minutes and making sure that he was in a teachers arms when I left. I do think that part of this is transition but I don't think that transition should be miserable.

Take care,
b
babyj is offline  
Old 09-08-2004, 01:03 PM
 
Tanibani's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2002
Location: Southern California
Posts: 2,984
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by comet
One Montessori school I checked out made it very clear that parents were not allowed to come to the classroom, except perhaps once or twice a year. GADS! It was a colder atmosphere than I wanted, almost too quiet. When I visited the school, I had to sit in a chair in the corner turned to one side so as to not disrupt the children. I was told to not make direct eye contact with any child.
Haven't read the entire thread yet. Don't know much about M. But I am aware that some schools don't do things as she wanted.

Just wanted to comment on the above. Yeah, that's creepy.... but the benefit of not interrupting the kids during their own exploration (whether at home, outside, whatever) is that the kids are busy learning, deepening their learning experience, whatever it is. Though at home I am very guilty of interrupting.... he'll be at the sink making a huge mess - sorry you gotta stop. Or we are on our way out the door and he'll want to look at the bug outside.

But not making eye contact. That just sounds bizarre and extreme to me. You can still make eye contact, smile and just let the kid be, no?

Quote:
Originally Posted by alwayslearning2
I really wanted my 2 1/2 to have the opportunity that montessori provides, however I hate hate hate that you cann't stay in the room till they get acclimated and have to hand then to the teacher at the door. I think he will love the materials and learning from the other children, but after a week of pre-school "summer camp" he doesn't want to leave the house, he says he wants to stay home,
My spidey instincts tell me that it would be "pushing him too soon." I agree with Babyj.

Kleine Hexe's post just made me

I'm sure many of you already know that kids learn by PLAYING. That is their most important job!

Ooey Gooey.com (Lisa Murphy is a former day care provider / preschool teacher and lecturer on the importance of play. I highly recommend her books!)

Quote:
We believe that children have the right to...

1) long periods of uninterrupted free play time
2) adults who are acting as facilitators
3) freedom to explore with few restrictions
4) lots and lots of outdoor time
5) be engaged in experiences that are real
Alwayslearning2... ask about getting your money back. Maybe do a site search (google) on the art of negotiating. I think he's WAY TO YOUNG (every kid is different) to be left alone. He's making it crystal clear to you. You might end up like Vanessa... just pulling him out early.... and losing all chances to get any money back. But the instructors (if they are like Vanessa's) don't sound sympathetic because they are so dang dogmatic.

T I take my son to a play-based preschool. Very similar to Lisa Murphy's philosophies on the importance of play.

There is a multi-age class. DS started going when he was 3.5 (I would have put him in earlier, like 2.5, but I found out too late and there was a waiting list....) He's in a multi-age class - 3-5 year olds... and it's a HUGE class with 50 kids. THere are different play stations (art, science, books, blocks, cars, costumes, etc... ) and parents have to work 1 day a week. So there are 2 or 3 teachers a day, but the PARENTS are integral to making it work because 2 have to man each station. That's what I LOVE about it, because I am totally free to stay and observe. Parents are facilitators in play (handing kids materials they need) and really don't spend much time talking to them (just each other) and that's not even a stated rule!!!! Just a natural outcome. I this school! Best part, it's extremely affordable (like $300 for 2 months) because part of it is paid by the state.

BTW, it's only 9-12, not a full day. I think that's a good thing... my friend has her DD in a full day M program and her DD has had really bad meltdown's at home. I do think that some kids are too young (she's 3.5) for a full day. Being away from your loved ones (mom or dad) so young for so long can really get to a kid at the end of the day.

First school day was yesterday and they encouraged new and old parents to stay with the child the half day (so as not to overwhelm the new / old kids and parents can walk with their children in the classroom, discovering how the room / things works). Doesn't sound like M to me.

10 - boy
5.5 - girl
Tanibani is offline  
 
User Tag List

Thread Tools


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off