Waldorf vs Montessori? - Mothering Forums
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#1 of 41 Old 12-21-2002, 01:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Anyone have any thoughts on this subject? My son is 29 mths old and goes to a Montessori school three mornings a week for 3 hours. He loves it! His teacher is great and he enjoys spending time with the other kids, as he's an only child. I know that the teacher makes all the difference in the world, regardless of the style of instructing. If I keep him in the same school, he'll go 5 days a week for 3 hours starting next fall. I'm not sure how I feel about having him gone so much. He is still an avid nurser and we are very attached to each other. Of course, if I get pg soon (hopefully ), then maybe it would be good for him to have his own special place.

I've heard good things about both approaches, but don't know much about Waldorf. I welcome any advice. I have a friend who is going to be starting a Waldorf preschool in the area in the fall. I just don't want to upset the apple cart if there isn't that much difference in the approaches.
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#2 of 41 Old 12-21-2002, 10:20 AM
 
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My 1st grader went to PK, K and now 1st grade at Montessori. We love it, and she does too. We do not have a Waldorf school real close by, so really not a choice issue but I do have to say that my childs class is so bright, carefree, loving and worldly!

I also have a 2 year old and I will send her when she is 4 just like her sister.

I like the teaching methodology, the language and humanities and the math. The early reading is great, and there is not a book my child can't read ( much like the rest of her class)

My friend with a child at Waldorf also raves about it, but says there is no focus on academia, her 6 year old cannot read and writes only some. Her child enjoys the play/learn through fantasy and the outside time. This works great for her kid.
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#3 of 41 Old 12-22-2002, 04:31 PM
 
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I am not an expert in the least. From being on these boards I have learned that there are vast differences between these two methods; though both are frequently chosen by attachment focused parents. It seems like a good idea to thoroughly research them. You might want to check out some of the old threads or do a search on this board for all references to both. There are links in the threads for websites. If that doesn't work let me know and I'll dig a little harder and see what's up with the Archives.

 
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#4 of 41 Old 12-23-2002, 12:37 PM
 
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First off, I want to start by saying the particular school you choose is more important than the method. Where I live, I did not like the Montessori choices as the children were cruel to one another in one and in the other, the chaos level was too high. My sister-in-law on the other hand, loves her Montessori school in Albuquerque.

Coming from the Waldorf perspective, here are what I see as differences from my experiences. Waldorf children spend a great deal of time outdoors and playing with items from nature. There is no plastic in the classrooms. In Kindergarten, the entire emphasis is on learning social skills so there is no letter or number learning. Ideally, children will not watch TV or movies, nor will they play computer or video games until about the age of 10. It has to do with the visual impact on brain development, not content. What this means for our family is esentially no TV because we are too exhausted to watch it after they go to bed. The children are not allowed to wear media character clothing. It is all about sheltering children from the media and our consumer culture. It is about letting them develop their imaginations without outside influences (outside the family and the teacher). Afterall, they will have many adult years to experience the media onslaught if they so choose.

Waldorf emphasizes body development and social skills until about the age of 7. At 7, the emphasis shifts to focusing on the mind while continuing the development of the body. There are many community festivals to participate in and it is really a whole family experience rather than just a child experience.

I have seen many children from Montessori transfer to Waldorf with few problems, so you don't have to make the switch immediately. Take the time to check out the Waldorf school and do some reading on Rudolf Steiner and his philosphy. See if it agees with you. Talk with teachers about how dogmatic the school is. Talk with other parents. Ask about how gifted children do and how children with learning problems are handled. Attend a Curriculum Fair or Open House and look at the students' work books.

If your Montessori school is wonderful, unless Waldorf especially appeals to you, I would stick with the school you love. All the best to you and your family. I am sure your choice will the right one for your family.
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#5 of 41 Old 12-26-2002, 07:21 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for the input. I will wait to see how the Waldorf school turns out (it's not even open yet). Grant is still young at 2 1/2, so I have time. He really seems to enjoy his current school. They play outside a lot and he's only there 3 hrs, 3 days a week.

I like the limited media exposure, but we already do most of that. We don't watch much TV and he doesn't do anything with the computer. I'm not thrilled with the lack of basic learning, as I hope that can be made fun in either school. Grant already knows the abc's and can count to 20. We just play around with that kind of thing and he learns at his own pace. I'm sure you all do the same thing.

Again, thanks for the response and I look forward to hearing more.

Dawn
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#6 of 41 Old 01-03-2003, 07:51 AM
 
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How much schooling at what age? It seems to me a very individual issue, between each parent/child couple. I chose not to send my 3 yr old daughter to a Montessori school that required full days 2-5 days a week. A full day felt too long for her and me. We have done wonderfully with 3 days a wk, 2 1/2 hours in another Montessori pre-school for the past 2 years. I would now graduate her to 5, 1/2 days but still wouldn't feel comfortable with full days. My son is 7 and full day school is just starting to feel like not too much (but also his school is over-stimulating). But I can imagine that there might be other kids who would flourish in longer programs.

Trust your instincts.

Julia (Michel's wife)
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#7 of 41 Old 01-06-2003, 06:54 PM
 
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I wanted to interject here that while 6 year olds may not be reading in Waldorf school that pre reading skills are practiced in Waldorf schools. They are not traditional ones like you would find in a public school but they are there. I read here that someone said that Waldorf school does not have much acedmics. I would like to say that Waldorf schools DO include a lot of acedemia. It is true that in the younger grades this approach focuses on other extremly important areas but through out the grades (at the schools here anyway) children begin Spanish and German in 1st grade. They begin to learn to knit in 1st grade (this is extremely good for later math skills) they begin to play a wooden flute in 1st grade and pick up a stringed instrument in 3rd. They receive painting instruction starting in KG, and the art in Waldorf schools is amazing! They sing and learn how to read music. The whole approach tries to help children be the best person they can be, to find themselves spiritauly, to be kind and caring towards others and to know they can achieve anything they put their minds to, for goodness sakes, they can knit, they must be able to do anything!

Sorry for going off like that, I feel very strongly about Waldorf education. Please be clear though that I am not saying Montessorri is not good, I know that is is a wonderful program as well. But it is certainly different.
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#8 of 41 Old 01-09-2003, 01:05 AM
 
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KristiMom
What a great summary of Waldorf-my daughter is in a waldorf kindergarten and I am taking the Foundation Year program.
When people ask me what it is about I always stumble over the answer-trying to include everything.
Thanks-I will try to remember some of it for the future!

Tracey
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#9 of 41 Old 01-10-2003, 01:35 AM
 
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I have heard many wonderful praises of the Waldorf education. I am a public school teacher, and unfortunately, the three children I have known to come to my classroom from Waldorf schools have been very much "behind" in relation to the state reading and mathematics standards. Two of the three were retained in my grade at the end of the year, unable to meat the rigors of the subsequent grade. While I would not discourage someone from sending their child to a Waldorf school based on this, I would strongly encourage taking a critical look at your committment to continuing in the Waldorf school rather than taking your child out part way through her education to send her to a public school. The case for two of the families I know is that they became no longer able to afford to pay for private school so they had to send their kids to public, and the children really suffered emotionally as a result. Just my opinion from my experience. I think Waldorf does so many things my public school does not- and I think it's probably a better education by the time the child completes 8th grade, as long as the student receives the full education.
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#10 of 41 Old 01-17-2003, 01:09 AM
 
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I'd be curious to know what grade the children from Waldorf school came to you that were behind in Math. I wonder because I know that if a 3rd grader transfered to a public school he/she may be behind in reading, but had they remained in Waldorf they would have been at the same level later on. (and would have been ahead in 3rd grade at art, music, flute, German, Spanish, and knitting).

I think it is important for parents to know when they enter a Waldorf school that the best time to enter them as far as transition goes and not being behind in anything or ahead in reading, is KG. Also, trying it out until 2nd grade and leaving is not a good idea. It would be hard on the child emotionaly as well as academically.

I think what ever your choice, Waldorf, Montesorri, public, if the commitment is there consistancy can be your best friend.
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#11 of 41 Old 01-17-2003, 01:49 AM
 
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KristiMom, the student I currently teach is an 8 year old 2nd grader who was unable to recognize numbers beyond 9 at the beginning of the school year, could not count beyond 15, tell time, count coins, or do any of the other skills expected by the end of 1st grade at my school. She has had no learning difficulties and is learning all of these skills now but is still considerably behind her new classmates.
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#12 of 41 Old 01-17-2003, 11:25 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by teachma
KristiMom, the student I currently teach is an 8 year old 2nd grader who was unable to recognize numbers beyond 9 at the beginning of the school year, could not count beyond 15, tell time, count coins, or do any of the other skills expected by the end of 1st grade at my school. She has had no learning difficulties and is learning all of these skills now but is still considerably behind her new classmates.
My son is in 1st grade at a Waldorf school and he has already learned numbers 1 - 20 in Arab numerals and in Roman. They haven't taught coin counting but he has picked that up at home. He has not been taught to tell time yet as that comes later at this Waldorf school.

You are right though, there are times when it is better to make the switch from Waldorf to public. Waldorf uses a different pace, not necessarily slower but rather it uses a different rhythm. Also, every school and every teacher (like public schools) is different. Some are better and some are worse.
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#13 of 41 Old 01-17-2003, 05:12 PM
 
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teachma- wow. I am sorry to hear that. My daughter is in KG and can count just fine. She can't tell time yet, but like Rhonwyn says, that comes later in Waldorf. I'm not sure but I beleive coins come in 2nd grade. If anyone else knows???? So on one hand I can see the issue but on the other........Waldorf schools beleives that movement, play and fantasy are necessary to the later development of intellectual and acedemic capacities. I can see though how these things the child is behind in compared to public school can be alarming. There are times when a child in public school transfers to Waldorf and some typical problems we see are that they generally have a very short attention span, their art skills can be at a minimum, spanish and German of course if they haven't had it as well as flute, recorder and knitting. The knitting thing may seem funny but it is extremely good for eye hand coordination, lengthening one's attention span, math skills, creativity and self esteem. My daughter can also identify many plants in the garden and knows how to take care of them of course anyone could do this at home, I just think it is neat that they have it in their play yard. Oh, and she just finished sewing a little stuffed mouse! Anyway, I am not necessarily trying to argue with you but show that while public school may consider Waldorf kids behind, Waldorf schools also consider public school students behind when they enter our schools.

Development of an individual is not always just about numbers or test scores. Most Waldorf children can also tell you a detaled and long fairy tale when they are in KG, so well that it still surprises me when they do it.

There is a book called "The Parent's Guide to Alternatives in Education by Ronald E. Koetzsch Ph.D. that is just wonderful! He outlines the philosophy to each eaducation type without saying one is better than another. There are some wonderful explantions in it and may types of education that I didn't even know existed.
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#14 of 41 Old 01-18-2003, 01:33 AM
 
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KristiMom, I understand the philosophy of the Waldorf school and although I am a public school teacher, I totally support it. I wouldn't even say that my school ddoes a better job of educating the whole child (I'm certain it doesn't). I think you misunderstood my point which was...if someone thinks she might start her child off at a Waldorf school with the option of switching the child out later, I wouldn't recommend it based on my experiences. Basically, the children I've known have suffered tremendously (mostly on an emotional level) as a result of their parents' choices.
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#15 of 41 Old 01-22-2003, 02:57 AM
 
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Back to the original poster's question about Montessori vs. Waldorf at the preschool level, I would say (though I'm no expert, I've just read a bit about both):

Both are basically child-centered programs which try to encourage order, freedom, and independence. You can find individual schools that each warp this in some way--Waldorf by being so sure of it's theory that it doesn't adequately allow/encourage differences among children, Montessori in that some have become more competitive and abstract/academic than the theory allows, usually due to parent pressure. Good programs in each will have supportive, caring teachers, an inspiring aesthetic to the space, lots of freedom for children to pursue their own interests.

Differences tend to be:
Aesthetic--both have organized space with lots to play with, usually a lot of wood, child sized furtniture, and the freedom to move around. But Waldorf will usually have more of a fantasy/watercolor children's book illustration look to it with pink walls, toys that still look like the branches they were made from, dolls, colored silks for decoration and dress up. Montessori is actually even more varied, but has child sized everything with more focus on puzzle-type things, activities set up in little trays, graduated rods and blocks, matching activities, activities that encourage phonemic awareness (like baskets of items or groups of pictures whose names all start with the same sound). Both ideally make use of both indoor and outdoor space.

Learning goals: Waldorf pre-K will tend to have a circle time with stories, puppet shows, fingerplays, songs and/or seasonal poems; time and materials for child-initiated fantasy play; time outside as a group; possibly a joint cooking activity or adults prepare a snack and the children can move in and out of the food preparation as they wish. There may be drawing with block crayons. The focus is on surrounding the child with beauty and goodness and encouraging the development of their fantasy life in fairly independent individual and group play.

Montessori pre-K will have a variety of activities in different learning areas. This website may give you a feel http://www.ux1.eiu.edu/~cfsjy/mts/_link.htm for some of the activities. The child learns either by observing an older/or just more experienced in that area child or through a brief demonstration by the teacher. Children have many opportunities to work independently to achieve new skills in self-care, language arts, foundational math experiences, etc.

Montessori schools can be lacking in opportunities for fantasy play. There aren't likely to be many dress up materials for example, especially compared to a Waldorf classroom with its playstands, puppets, and silks. Waldorf schools can be lacking in experiences that allow skill development that many kids really have a passion for--counting, comparing, measuring, weighing, being able, on a regular basis, to show mastery of a skill that they struggles with a week or a month ago. Personally, I think both are important and you may want to encourage the balancing skills in your homelife and play experiences.

Sherri
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#16 of 41 Old 01-22-2003, 11:08 AM
 
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Thank you Sherri-- I have always wanted someone to spell out some of the key similarities and differences as you did, and even though I'm not the one who asked the original question, your response was very helpful to me, the moderator!

Lauren

 
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#17 of 41 Old 01-22-2003, 12:24 PM
 
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I'm no expert on either form of education but my sense is that the same activities in each can have different meanings as far as the intent of the philosophy behind them. These are rough estimates and do not apply in all cases but in Waldorf education the teacher is the lesson and in Montessori the teacher is the guide. That the child discovers reading or knowledge is more central in Waldorf as discovery brings more meaning with it to the child than the actual acquisition of a skill. Toys and crafts are present in both but for different reasons. In Montessori they help the child become facile with their environment. In Waldorf, they help in the development of the "will;" the child's ability to do what the best part of them feels should be done, to be able to overcome their desires or delay gratification. It seems to me both methods are right and that the kids, having read neither Steiner nor Montessori, know little of the philosophies behind the two and are free to grow within either one in ways neither educator imagined.
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#18 of 41 Old 01-22-2003, 05:48 PM
 
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teachma- thank you for clarifying your point. I dind't mean to miss it. Thank you for you view point.

cumulus and Sherri- thank you for the information.

I totally agree that Waldorf and Montessori are very good programs. A family just has to figure out what is right for them.
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#19 of 41 Old 01-24-2003, 03:50 AM
 
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This has been such an interesting topic to me. I love Waldorf educational ideals, but there isn't a Waldorf near to us, so we're thinking of sending our son to Montessori preschool. This school goes all the way up through 8th grade.

My question is, does anyone know how much emphasis there will be on homework once they're out of preschool in Montessori? I really don't want him to be overwhelmed with work after school hours.

Thanks,

Juliana
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#20 of 41 Old 01-24-2003, 11:09 AM
 
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I would think that there would be little homework, at least in the early years. If so, it should be very self-chosen kinds of stuff, like child reads a book at home at certain intervals or makes some journal entries. According to what I understand of the philosophy, it should remain low-key and low-pressure, following the child's readiness as expressed by their focus, dedication, and excitement for a particular learning activity as it comes.

BUT, check with your individual school. Some people send their kids to Montessori because they want them academically ahead of and hence able to outcompete other kids for later entering competitive private schools. So, bowing to parent pressure, some Montessori schools end up with even early elementary age kids getting grades, basically--they call it something else, but it amounts to being rated "ahead of agemates" "about the same as agemates" and "behind most agemates" and becomes part of a permanent record that is past on and can even be used to keep some kids from moving to a new classroom with the other kids their age when the time comes. I could see this type of school giving homework.

Another challenge with both Montessori and Waldorf--some parents are purists and very knowledgeable, some have little understanding at all of the philosophy and just want a good environment for their kids to learn with other kids or be out of the home part of the week. There can often be tensions between the two--and even parents and teachers committed to the philosophy will differ greatly on interpretation--for example, Waldorf educators differ on approach to kids who learn things they aren't being taught, like reading, way before other kids; Montessori teachers and parents can differ greatly in how they interpret ideas like "control of error" and "freedom within a prepared environment".

Sherri

p.s. I think that in most cases it sounds like you would be happy with continuing in Montessori.
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#21 of 41 Old 02-12-2003, 10:09 AM
 
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I was wondering the same thing, but I checked out Waldorf first. A good friend of mine sent her son to Montessori, and when she transferred him to a high-end Jewish dayschool, his teachers were very concerned because all he'd do was wander around the classroom all day long. Which would be perfectly acceptable if it was still part of the Montessori program, imo, but he is having a very difficult time transitioning to a more academics-based program.
I find it interesting, that post about:
" KristiMom, the student I currently teach is an 8 year old 2nd grader who was unable to recognize numbers beyond 9 at the beginning of the school year, could not count beyond 15, tell time, count coins, or do any of the other skills expected by the end of 1st grade at my school."
Because my three year old can count to fifteen, say her ABC's, and she has some letter and number recognition. Because I, THE PARENT, taught her this. I don't say, "oh, that school didn't teach her such-and-such..." I do say, "Where has the parent been?" and that's what makes these alternative forms of education different from the institutional kind. The parent is expected to give their children basic knowledge, if they so desire!; it is not up to the school in the early years of "education" to etch things into their brains. That would hinder the development of right brain thinking to its fullest potential, which is what I, ultimately, would like to see through whichever form of early education I choose for my child. Many people argue with me about this philosophy, but I stand by it strongly: the first seven or eight years of life are the best time to nurture a child's creative and spiritual potential, and many children - myself included - are "ruined" by well-meaning parents and teachers dismissing this basic truth. True learning in these formative years is not about memorizing crap. It is about exploring the limitless, boundless creative and spiritual potential of our children. Only in middle and high school do we see these results academically, where complex theories such as physics are grasped thanks to the full development of the right brain.
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#22 of 41 Old 02-12-2003, 10:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by JuliaRBene
My question is, does anyone know how much emphasis there will be on homework once they're out of preschool in Montessori? I really don't want him to be overwhelmed with work after school hours.

ZERO! Any on going projects are done in class. My DD has friend in public school that were LOADED with homework in K and 1st grade. My girls usually asks " why can't they get their work done at school? " good question!
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#23 of 41 Old 02-12-2003, 10:46 AM
 
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My friend's children are in a montessori public elementary school...so they have to take standardized tests. They do get homework starting 1st grade, and have instituted a spelling test once a week on words they use throughout the week. They get a homework packet once a week that takes about 1.5 hrs...up to 3 depending on your child's interest in actually doing it. It's about 10 pages including math, writing, etc. The hybridization is weird, but the homework load is less than regular public school.
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#24 of 41 Old 06-27-2004, 08:08 AM
 
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Pulling this one up too, due to new interest.

 
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#25 of 41 Old 07-04-2004, 10:03 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by teachma
KristiMom, the student I currently teach is an 8 year old 2nd grader who was unable to recognize numbers beyond 9 at the beginning of the school year, could not count beyond 15, tell time, count coins, or do any of the other skills expected by the end of 1st grade at my school. She has had no learning difficulties and is learning all of these skills now but is still considerably behind her new classmates.

I'm sorry, but I think the parents bear responsiblity for this. Either the child is a slow learner, or the parents did nothing to educate him at home. I plan to send my daughter to our local Waldorf school. I was concerned that reading is not taught until 3rd grade, until I learned that most of the kiddies there are bright enough to pick it up before then anyway. There is less need to teach it formally when a child is raised in a "literacy-rich" environment. Any normal home environment would allow for the learning of numbers, telling time, counting money, reciting the alphabet, etc....There is more going on there than the failure of Waldorf schooling.
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#26 of 41 Old 07-05-2004, 03:04 AM
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Quote:
I wanted to interject here that while 6 year olds may not be reading in Waldorf school that pre reading skills are practiced in Waldorf schools. They are not traditional ones like you would find in a public school but they are there. I read here that someone said that Waldorf school does not have much acedmics. I would like to say that Waldorf schools DO include a lot of acedemia.

ITA... the whole reading issue is blown totally out of proportion. Waldorf children may (MAY!) read late, but once they do, they read with greater comprehension. Several children in my family attend Waldorf schools in NY and Olivia will be going here in PA starting in 1st grade.
Our Waldorf school only goes as far as 8th grade, so our kids have to switch to public high schools. Every year when we get the graduation newsletter, nearly every child on the list is going on to advanced placement courses in the public/private high schools they're moving on to.
The waldorf methods teaches comprehension above rote learning. Most of what our kids get in the early grades in public schools is pounded in through repetition, it's not unlike the way you train a dog.
Also: Waldorf educators do not discourage parents from teaching their young children to read, if that's what they so desire!
As far as likenesses, differences, I guess it depends on the particular school. Here's what I've gleaned:
Both methods focus on creativity and child-led learning. Both emphasize the arts and individual expression. Both emphasis the sacredness of childhood and reject the bombardment of media images and consumerism that deprive our children of individuality and innocence. Both are very hands-on.
I have found Montessori to be more focused on academia with the younger kids, but with the older kids they seem pretty comparable.
Montessori schools are usually made up of mixed classrooms; different age groups learn together. Children who are more advanced in one area can learn with the older children, and in subjects where they're struggling they can gravitate back with a younger group. I was raised with Montessori education, and after one year I was a full year ahead of my public school friends, because I gravitated towards a higher level. Children who hang back in certain areas won't even know they're doing it, and won't be judged.
In Waldorf schools young children learn almost exclusively through creative expression and experience rather than lectures. In order to learn something, rather than being told about it they are allowed to do it. There is an emphasis on fantasy play, drama, music, and art.
I chose Waldorf over Montessori because our Waldorf school has a better sense of community, but it's no indictment on Montessori education.
My one concern with Waldorf education is that the environment can be a bit cultish and inflexible, but in our area the Montessori schools seem to flop to the opposite extreme and pander too much to mainstream parental input.
Most Waldorf and Montessori schools have websites these days. Their philosophies should be posted on the sites, and they should have days put aside for prospective parents to sit in on classes.
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#27 of 41 Old 07-05-2004, 04:35 AM
 
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We are considering Waldorf schooling, but my biggest concern is that the Waldorf school near me only goes up to 6th grade. After that, it's either home, alternative (which is essentially student-led) or public. DH and I do NOT want her going to public if it's at ALL possible. Even if we have to get down on our knees and beg relatives to pay for private school tuition, we will. Both of us went to public. I transferred to alternative in 10th grade, and I firmly believe it saved my life.

What I'm curious about is what about Waldorf students who later transfer to Montessori? Does anyone have any experience with this?
There is both Waldorf and Montessori in the area where DD will likely be going to school... I think the Montessori goes higher than Waldorf does.

Also, ITA about the "where's the parents?". I think parents should be involved with their child's learning at home as well, after all you are their biggest role model. If they could choose, I think most small children would want YOU as their teacher.

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#28 of 41 Old 07-05-2004, 09:14 PM
 
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My question is, does anyone know how much emphasis there will be on homework once they're out of preschool in Montessori? I really don't want him to be overwhelmed with work after school hours.
If it is a TRUE Montessori 6-9 or 9-12 program, there should be no homework actually. Because there is no time limit on how long a child can take to master a subject, they tend to focus on areas until they have mastered it on their own, to their own satisfaction. And they may go back to a subject area again and again later down the road. Because they are allowed to move at their own pace, they can spend a whole day on math activities if desired so the need to take work home to master isn't necessary.

That may be something you want to check with the school about. Beacuse it is self directed and the teacher should be observing, they will let you know is there is a concern. That is also the beauty of the multi age group, he'll have three years to master everything in his environment instead of having to cram it into 9 months. Besides, hopefully the environment he's in will be so wonderful to him, he'll want to share his daily knowledge with you at home and will do "homework" for his own personal, internal desire.

Paula Polk Lillard has written a book called Montessori Today that explains a good deal about the Montessori elementary program.
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#29 of 41 Old 07-05-2004, 09:42 PM
 
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It is so funny that I've been away for a while and I came to this education thread to talk about Montessori & here you all are!

My dh and I are going for an "interview" at a local Montessori school on Thursday. I had already visited with my three year old dd and we liked it...but now her being accepted relies on this interview...whether my dh and I are "acceptable."

I'm kind of freaked out about it. And the main thing I'm on the fence about is the amount of class time. It will be every day two and one half hours per day.
I asked if they have a two or three day option and there is not.

There school day is more like playing but....I'm wondering how it will go. My dd hates to leave me lately.

I will resume classes in the fall and had already enrolled her in mt school day-care for three mornings. So....I'm unsure.

Any thoughts about this interview? Anybody else experience this?
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#30 of 41 Old 11-29-2004, 07:37 AM
 
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My child is a second year (equivilant to a second grader). In the primary class, 1,2,and 3rd years, there is no given homework. However, if a child is messing around during work period, and there goals weren't completed because of this then the natural consequence is to have to take some work home.
Montessori focuses on natural consequences. In the junior elementary class, 4, 5, and 6 years, I believe there is only homework some of the times. Not on a regular basis.
As far as the interview question goes. Don't worry. It's basicly a get to know you kind of interview. It shouldn't be an accept or unaccept you interview. They usually, from my experience, talk about your methods of parenting and teaching in the home. It helps the guide to know your ds/dd a little better before starting. They'll ask questions from birth up to present. Maybe even questions about the labor. Developmental milestones, such as when they began to walk, to talk. All of these matter in the way a child develops and learns.
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