So...I'll hold her back, but what should I do with her? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
Reply
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 12:56 AM - Thread Starter
 
Mrs_Hos's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2004
Location: Dayton, Oh
Posts: 1,565
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My dd has a 16 Aug birthday--and the cut off for K is 31 Aug around here...it would make her the youngest in her class if I start her in K this Aug.

I am 75% sure I will hold her back...she is small (and dh's family grows small girls). However, she is emotionally 'ready' and definitely ready educationally (so says her Preschool teacher who is impressed with her progress...).

But if she doesnt' go to K...what will I do with her?
She has been in the same Preschool for 2 yrs now...do I have her go a 3rd year? They are learning the same thing again, and I worry that she will start to find learning to be 'boring' or something.

I thought fo homeschooling...but not sure I really want to do that either.

Any ideas?
:
Mrs_Hos is offline  
#2 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 01:00 AM
 
ledzepplon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: San Diego, CA
Posts: 5,775
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
So you would hold her back because she's physically small, even though she's ready intellectually and emotionally? I don't want to second guess you, since you're the mama and I don't have a school-age child yet. But I'm not sure if I'd do the same thing.

Are you worried about her getting hurt physically, or picked on? If that's the case, why not homeschool? From what I've read, homeschooling a kindergartener takes less than an hour a day (depending on the child and educational philosophy you subscribe to).

Wife to a wonderful dh and mom to four beautiful kiddos, dd (3/04):, ds1 (1/06), ds2 (10/08), and ds3 (7/10)
ledzepplon is offline  
#3 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 02:16 AM
 
aniT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Oregon, by way of Cali.
Posts: 16,520
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs_Hos View Post
Any ideas?
:
Yea.. send her to school. Take it from someone who's BD was just 19 days after the cut off. IT SUCKS being the oldest person in the class. It sucks already knowing everything they are teaching and being bored out of your mind. Trust me, this screws you up all the way through high school.

The fact that your daughter's BD falls before the cut off and you are holding her back might also effect how she feels about herself. She might feel for some reason she is not good enough to go to school with the other kids her age. If you don't plan on homeschooling her I think holding her back would not be a good thing for her at all.
aniT is offline  
#4 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 02:46 AM
 
AdoptChina's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 561
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My DSs bday is 8/15. I did not hold him back and he did very well in kindergarten. If your DD was not ready emotionally or not able to follow directions etc I would consider holding her back, but if its just b/c she is small and will be one of the youngest I wouldnt do it
AdoptChina is offline  
#5 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 11:28 AM
 
bdavis337's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2005
Location: Sleep Deprivation, USA
Posts: 6,024
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to agree with the pp's. If she's emotionally AND academically ready, you can send her. Holding her back for physical size isn't going to change anything. There are several boys in my son's K class who are by far older than the rest, and still the smallest. And some of the youngest kids are the tallest, etc.
bdavis337 is offline  
#6 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 12:09 PM
 
guestmama9908's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,821
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I have to agree with the PP's as well. I am only 4'11" and weighed about 95 pounds when I graduated from high school. If my mother had held me back because of my size I would have been held back many years. LOL.

If she is emotionally ready and prepared why make her sit through another year of pre-school?
guestmama9908 is offline  
#7 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 12:47 PM
 
love2all's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2003
Location: planet earth...mostly
Posts: 1,524
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My dd is a fall baby and one of the oldest in her class- i really do not see anything that 'sucks' about it. Actually she is a natural leader and most kids have always looked to her for clues and guidance. She is doing wonderfully right where she is- she has always been bright acedemically and it is nice to see her pick things up easily and not struggle. Who knows how things would be if she were in the 6th now instad of 5th?
You as her mother knows waht is best for her.. and what to do with her? If you are able; I say spend a year hanging out with her- once she starts at a ps she is in a commitment for the long run...
so take the time to enjoy her!!!
love2all is offline  
#8 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 02:54 PM
 
dancingmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 720
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My dd has a fall birthday and I'm holding her back too. Mother's instinct. Plus the exhaustive research I've done.... I have talked to about 20+ teachers, counselors, etc at all different ages, through high school, asking if the older kids in their classes generally run into any problems (early development, social awkwardness, boredom, etc). Every single one of them said they just hadn't seen it. They had, however, seen plenty of instances where the younger kids were having problems. They said that school gets so academic so quickly now, and they see kids that are bright and creative and would be thriving if only in the grade below, but are struggling in their current grades. They spoke to developmental milestones that occur at 6, 8, 10, 14, and note that development is not linear. That is, just cuz a kid looks K-ready, doesn't mean she'll be 6th-grade ready, KWIM?

Anyway, obviously some of the PPs have had their own experiences with being oldest and not liking it. But I made my decision based on the majority of the info I was getting. Obviously there will always be exceptions, but I can only base my decision on the best info I can gather, and my own instincts.

FWIW, we decided to do a private very alternative half-day Kindergarten this fall, followed by public school Kindergarten next year. The private K is different enough from the PS that she will not be repeating the same stuff. But if this wasn't an option, I might just keep doing PS.
dancingmama is offline  
#9 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 04:10 PM
 
LauraLoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: By the light of the silvery moon
Posts: 3,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancingmama View Post
. Plus the exhaustive research I've done.... I have talked to about 20+ teachers, counselors, etc at all different ages, through high school, asking if the older kids in their classes generally run into any problems (early development, social awkwardness, boredom, etc). Every single one of them said they just hadn't seen it. They had, however, seen plenty of instances where the younger kids were having problems. They said that school gets so academic so quickly now, and they see kids that are bright and creative and would be thriving if only in the grade below, but are struggling in their current grades.
I find the bolded parts very amazing (my emphasis.) I can site many personal examples of just the opposite. I can also cite other references.

To the OP, probably whatever you decide will work out in the long run, unless she is very academically driven and in that case, you will have behavior problems from boredom. But really, my gentle questions to you is these: Are you ready for her to go to kindergarten? Is holding her back because of size your only concern, or maybe you aren't ready to let her go yet? I remember having mixed feelings when my ds entered kindergarten and I saw many mothers cry on the first day. Going to kindergarten means that your little dd is growing up, and maybe you aren't ready for that. No judgement here, just another way for you to look at this.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

LauraLoo is offline  
#10 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 05:50 PM
 
Cassandra M.'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 895
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My daughter turned 5 on Nov 7th. We could have put her in kindergarden (Michigan cut off is Dec 1st I think) but we opted to wait.

She is now in kindergarden and is 6. She is the 7th oldest in her class of 18 kids so there are plenty that are older than her. She is absolutely thriving and I'm so glad I didn't rush it!

I agree, go with your gut! No need to rush, they grow up too quick anyway!
Cassandra M. is offline  
#11 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 07:15 PM
 
wildmonkeys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2004
Location: Metro DC
Posts: 1,639
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I would probably send her based on what you shared, but it is difficult to see the whole picture in a brief email.

One of my friends was in nearly the same position and sent her son to a 1/2 day private kinder for the year and figured she would decide in the spring whether to send him to public kinder or first the following year based on how he was doing (her feeling being that if being younger seemed a liability he could be the oldest starting kinder the following fall without the stigma of repeating kinder in the same school)...She ended up sending him straight to first. I also have two friends whose dds had late August birthdays and debated waiting a year and sent them to kinder instead and they both seem fine, but that is just their experience. You know if she is not ready for some reason.

You mentioned her preschool teachers input, have you talked with the grade school at all? They might have some ideas as well.

Good luck - somebody has to be the oldest & the youngest and it is very difficult to decide what to do when a child is near the cutoff.

BJ
Barney, Ben & soon to be #3!!!
wildmonkeys is offline  
#12 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 09:05 PM
 
Ape94's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Texas
Posts: 106
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
my ds will turn 5 just after the cut off, so he will have to wait another year anyway. but he is already in the highest room in his preschool and since we don't want him to repeat this year over again, we are going to put him into a private kindergarten next year and then public K the following year. we know he is bound to repeat alot in his public K class, but we would rather him be ahead academically while adjusting to a new school and new kids.

also, fwiw, i missed the cut off by 10 days, so i was like the 3rd of 4th oldest in my class and i loved being one of the oldest!
Ape94 is offline  
#13 of 37 Old 02-06-2007, 11:30 PM
 
GearGirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Posts: 2,950
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've posted on this subject a ton so I won't bore anyone with my opinion, but if you are going to hold her back, given what you describe I think you should consider doing what a mom in my ds's K class did. She went through the whole youngest in the class thing with her middle son, and didn't want to do it again with her youngest, but she felt he was ready for kindergarten. She asked for an inter district transfer, and her son went to kindergarten at our school, and then the following year he transfered to his school to start kindergarten again with the class he will be with throughout. It really worked well, he is very happy, and he was able to benefit from not being held back, but given the nature of kindergarten, it is an easy grade to repeat because it is pretty individualized, and the kids are at all different levels. For what its worth the K teacher strongly recommended he go to 1st grade, but she stuck with her plan. I think it is much easier at a different school!
GearGirl is offline  
#14 of 37 Old 02-11-2007, 09:00 PM
 
bobandjess99's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Northern IN
Posts: 5,912
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Well...there are several issues here....my main concern, much like ledzepplon, is that I guess I don't understand how your reasoning is working. In myopinion, emotional and intellectual maturity are the things that MATTER when making this decision...physical size not so much.
If you were on here saying that your child is close to the cutoff and you feel she is not ready for K due to emotional reasons, or intellectual/educational reasons, I would so be agreeing with you...but ti sounds like you are actually the posterfamily for "when to send your near-cutoff age child to kindergarten"
She has been in preschool for 2 years? She is familiar with the concept of school, teachers, expectations, etc? She is, according to your description, both emotionally ready and educationally ready?

I just can't see why you would hold her back......???.....

I know personal experiences don't mean much, because ..well, everyone has a different one, LOL! But really, being BORED is a much worse fate in school than being small.....

CPST
bobandjess99 is online now  
#15 of 37 Old 02-12-2007, 02:26 PM
 
mom2ponygirl's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 1,562
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancingmama View Post
My dd has a fall birthday and I'm holding her back too. Mother's instinct. Plus the exhaustive research I've done.... I have talked to about 20+ teachers, counselors, etc at all different ages, through high school, asking if the older kids in their classes generally run into any problems (early development, social awkwardness, boredom, etc). Every single one of them said they just hadn't seen it. They had, however, seen plenty of instances where the younger kids were having problems. They said that school gets so academic so quickly now, and they see kids that are bright and creative and would be thriving if only in the grade below, but are struggling in their current grades. They spoke to developmental milestones that occur at 6, 8, 10, 14, and note that development is not linear. That is, just cuz a kid looks K-ready, doesn't mean she'll be 6th-grade ready, KWIM?
.
I would think you need to check out The Templeton Report http://www.nationdeceived.org/
It goes over the overwhelming amount of research supporting acceleration and the fact that most schools base their decisions on anecdotal evidence rather than real data. Acceleration is not for every child, but this report gives you objective criteria to base your decision on rather than some individual's misperceptions. The kids who are young for their grade and do fine are not remembered as being young. It is always the kids with difficulties who are remembered. You also don't know whether or not a child would have more or different problems having been held back. Every child deserves the opportunity to learn.
mom2ponygirl is offline  
#16 of 37 Old 02-12-2007, 03:00 PM
 
aniT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Oregon, by way of Cali.
Posts: 16,520
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ape94 View Post
also, fwiw, i missed the cut off by 10 days, so i was like the 3rd of 4th oldest in my class and i loved being one of the oldest!
Well it was nice in high school because I was 18 my senior year and could leave whenever I wanted. Since I was bored and hated school so much, that was often.
aniT is offline  
#17 of 37 Old 02-12-2007, 05:11 PM
 
TiredX2's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: it appears to be a handbasket
Posts: 20,475
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by aniT View Post
Well it was nice in high school because I was 18 my senior year and could leave whenever I wanted. Since I was bored and hated school so much, that was often.
Since BIL was the same way (9 days past cut off) that was one of our big deciding factors in sending DS "on time" (8/31 birthday, 8/31 cut-off).

 

 

TiredX2 is offline  
#18 of 37 Old 02-13-2007, 05:35 PM
 
RomanGoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Across the pond
Posts: 2,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs_Hos View Post
I am 75% sure I will hold her back...she is small (and dh's family grows small girls). However, she is emotionally 'ready' and definitely ready educationally (so says her Preschool teacher who is impressed with her progress...).
:
I can't answer your question but I just wanted to say, I don't understand. Why on earth would you hold her back if she is emotionally and academically ready? It will be so frustrating for her if she is ready to learn and she is denied the opportunity.

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
RomanGoddess is offline  
#19 of 37 Old 02-13-2007, 06:33 PM
 
Houdini's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2004
Location: Searching for Jason Bourne
Posts: 4,022
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I am totally with you mama. You know your daughter. Are there any Pre-K programs available you could send her to instead of another year of pre-school? Good luck to you mama.

Rebecca wife of Megan...moms to six crazy kiddos! Seth (15), Madison (13), Zachary (12), Trevor (12), Alex (10), and Nicholas (9)
Houdini is offline  
#20 of 37 Old 02-13-2007, 06:38 PM
 
dancingmama's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Posts: 720
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by cmlp View Post
Why on earth would you hold her back if she is emotionally and academically ready? It will be so frustrating for her if she is ready to learn and she is denied the opportunity.
I guess I don't really understand this. Why isn't she going to learn? No doubt homeschooling mamas would say there is plenty of learning going on, despite not being in school! I guess I just don't get why it's bad to keep a kid home for an extra year, in an enriching home/family environment, to minimize the chances of her struggling with formal academic expectations as the years progress. I think it's more important to find a school that will try to meet your child where s/he is, and encourage her love of learning, etc, regardless of her age. We have open schools and charter schools in our area that make it a point to do this.

Also, thanks to a PP for the link. But from what I read, it seems like it was applying to gifted kids. I can't speak for the OP, but my dd is certainly bright, but I wouldn't catagorize her as gifted per se.

In addition, the feedback from the 25-odd teachers I talked to was not that ALL younger kids struggle, but that some of them do. And that they couldn't always tell who that would be based solely on Kindergarten readiness. And THEY didn't see problems with older kids and boredom, etc. They just didn't have that experience. I should also add that I live in a community where most kids are coming from enriching homes with involved parents. Not sure if that makes a difference too.

Anyway, I'm enjoying reading different people's opinions on this.
dancingmama is offline  
#21 of 37 Old 02-13-2007, 06:49 PM
 
LauraLoo's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: By the light of the silvery moon
Posts: 3,762
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancingmama View Post
In addition, the feedback from the 25-odd teachers I talked to was not that ALL younger kids struggle, but that some of them do. And that they couldn't always tell who that would be based solely on Kindergarten readiness. And THEY didn't see problems with older kids and boredom, etc. They just didn't have that experience. .
Some children (and adults) live lives of quiet desperation. Just because the teachers you spoke to couldn't identify it, doesn't mean that it didn't or doesn't exist.

Laura - Mom to ds (10) and dd (7) "Time stands still best in moments that look suspiciously like ordinary life." Brian Andreas.

LauraLoo is offline  
#22 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 01:21 PM
 
ChristaN's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Colorado
Posts: 3,229
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I know that some of us have strong opinions in this area and I hope that the tone here has not put you off. I did make the opposite decision of what you are leaning toward. My girls' bds are at the end of August and end of September. Our cut-off varies by district (btwn June to October 1 depending on the district). We did start both of them in K just before they turned 5.

We also had a similar issue regarding size with our younger dd. She, at best, will be 5'1" from what the pediatrician expects. However, given that my mom is just under 5', dh is 5'6", grandpa was 5'4", grandma 4'10"... she just isn't going to be tall. As others have said, if she were in K this year rather than 1st, she'd still be one of the smaller kids. Also, they will all reach their full height by highschool (usually) in any case, and even if being older gave her a little lead on size for the earlier years, she'd again be the smallest when she and all of the other girls stop growing. From what dh says, being a short guy is harder than being a short girl, though. (Then again, there was my brother who didn't mind being the short guy -- 4'11" in 9th grade despite being one of the oldest -- b/c it meant that his face was right at the girls' chests when slow dancing !)

I can't imagine either of my girls in the younger grade, especially my older one. We are actually hoping to skip her to 5th grade next year as it would be a much better social and academic fit for her. Despite anecdotes, the research does not support the idea that younger children (those who just made the cut-off) struggle socially or academically. I found this article (http://www.journal.naeyc.org/btj/200...yingKEntry.pdf) by the National Association for the Education of Young Children to be worth a read for those debating whether to hold their children out a year.

However, if you do still decide that it is in your dd's best interest to wait a year to start K, I'd be inclined to discuss the options with her. Does she want to spend another year at the same preschool? Would she rather just be home for a year?
ChristaN is offline  
#23 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 02:05 PM
 
RomanGoddess's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Across the pond
Posts: 2,051
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancingmama View Post
I guess I don't really understand this. Why isn't she going to learn? No doubt homeschooling mamas would say there is plenty of learning going on, despite not being in school! I guess I just don't get why it's bad to keep a kid home for an extra year, in an enriching home/family environment, to minimize the chances of her struggling with formal academic expectations as the years progress. I think it's more important to find a school that will try to meet your child where s/he is, and encourage her love of learning, etc, regardless of her age. We have open schools and charter schools in our area that make it a point to do this.
I understood the OP to mean that she wanted to "hold her back" - meaning prevent her from moving forward, i.e. NOT give her the education provided in kindergarten. If she were to "homeschool", she would be giving the kindergarten education but in a home environment.

I am a firm believer that we should not let age determine when a child should learn something but should instead let the child lead our decisions. If a child is ready to learn to read at age THREE, then he should be given the opportunity to do so. If he is not ready to learn to read until age 8, then so be it. The OP says her daughter is academically ready to learn kindergarten material. I don't get why anyone would purposely prevent a child who is ready and willing to learn certain material from learning it.

Incidentally, there are entire countries in which children start grade one at age five (the United Kingdom, for example) and the vast majority of children in these countries do absolutely fine.

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
RomanGoddess is offline  
#24 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 02:27 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Kindergarten isn't even required. Keep her home another year then send her to first grade. Being the youngest every year rocks, you end up seeming a lot smarter, just cause you're little. :
sapphire_chan is offline  
#25 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 02:32 PM
 
sapphire_chan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 27,769
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancingmama View Post
FWIW, we decided to do a private very alternative half-day Kindergarten this fall, followed by public school Kindergarten next year. The private K is different enough from the PS that she will not be repeating the same stuff. But if this wasn't an option, I might just keep doing PS.
Wait, aren't we talking half-day kindergarten? Have they finally gone through with that BS full-day kindergarten idea? And being more academic earlier on? Eww...
sapphire_chan is offline  
#26 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 02:57 PM
 
aniT's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Location: Oregon, by way of Cali.
Posts: 16,520
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by dancingmama View Post
In addition, the feedback from the 25-odd teachers I talked to was not that ALL younger kids struggle, but that some of them do. And that they couldn't always tell who that would be based solely on Kindergarten readiness. And THEY didn't see problems with older kids and boredom, etc. They just didn't have that experience. I should also add that I live in a community where most kids are coming from enriching homes with involved parents. Not sure if that makes a difference too.
They didn't see it because they didn't want to see it. Those kids were probably labeled with other problems. I think I stated this earlier but maybe not in this thread, (I don't want to go back and look.) My dh was tested for learning disabilities. He was given every single label in the book. He was a trouble maker, he was lazy, (ok well that part is true), they looked for everything BUT the real problem. HE WAS BORED TO TEARS! He was denied being put into GATE not because he wasn't academically capable, but because he had behavioral problems. Come on people. The behavioral problems were because you were boring him to death... :

Quote:
Originally Posted by sapphire_chan View Post
Wait, aren't we talking half-day kindergarten? Have they finally gone through with that BS full-day kindergarten idea? And being more academic earlier on? Eww...
I saw on the news last night here that they are trying to make K a full day. I was so irritated by this. My oldest DD had full day and my younger had half day. My oldest was always in trouble. She had three referrals in K alone. Most of this was due to age appropriate behavior that they didn't believe the kids should be exhibiting. : When 6 weeks into the 1st grade she was constantly in trouble and behind held in recesses because "I" forgot to put her homework folder in her backpack I switched her to a different school/district. She has NEVER had problem since.

My younger daughter did wonderfully in 1/2 day kindergarten, and did great in school in general until we moved to a different state. She is now being home schooled because of the schools here.

Full day K is a joke.
aniT is offline  
#27 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 09:41 PM
 
Laggie's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: Vancouver
Posts: 3,126
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
DD is one of the youngest in her class AND short for her age. When they line up outside the classroom in the morning she is the shortest by about 4 inches. Academically she has been doing quite well - she is reading at grade 5 level and is only in grade 3. However, she has yet to make any close friends other than one boy who is a year older than her and who also has no other friends.

I don't know if her age/emotional immaturity have anything to do with that or not. It does worry me. I think it has been compounded by the fact that for 3 years in a row she has been in split classes with older kids, so there are not many kids her own age in her class for her to make friends with.

Finally pregnant with #1 and #2! Due September 9th, 2014 
   
Laggie is online now  
#28 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 11:24 PM
 
honeybee's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: West MI
Posts: 2,920
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
I've read from a few different sources that the research supports waiting. Older kids do better in the grade than the youngest do, period. There was a longitudinal study looking ay early entrance "gifted" students who ended up with many negative outcomes as the years went on. Also, kids with Dec birthdays in another study were more likely to be labeled learning disabled than January birthdays. I'm not sending my Nov. birthday child to K until he is 5-turning-6.

Does your area have a Young 5s program? A lot of people here rave about it.

Just some thoughts.

Melissa crochetsmilie.gif, wife to Tom geek.gif, mom to The Baron modifiedartist.gif, the Bean superhero.gif, Little Bear diaper.gif, and Baby Beaver babyboy.gif
honeybee is offline  
#29 of 37 Old 02-14-2007, 11:40 PM
 
maybemom05's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2004
Location: No. Virginia
Posts: 460
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
This is a hard call, but I think you can trust your gut.

If it helps, try to think of your worst case scenario. If she is in pre-school for another year and she's bored/feels badly about herself/is acting out etc, can't you just enroll her in PS kindergarden mid-year. It's not the easiest thing to switch in the middle in the year, but I think it could be an option. Just a thought

SAHM to my and and due in summer 2010, married to my best friend.
maybemom05 is offline  
#30 of 37 Old 02-15-2007, 12:09 AM
 
littlemizflava's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: GTA,ontario,canada
Posts: 1,426
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
if you are not sure about homeschooling and want to try it then i would say hold her back a year and try it and see how it works for you
littlemizflava is offline  
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Drag and Drop File Upload
Drag files here to attach!
Upload Progress: 0
Options

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the Mothering Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
User Name:
If you do not want to register, fill this field only and the name will be used as user name for your post.
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.



User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off