why do you not homeschool? - Page 5 - Mothering Forums
View Poll Results: why do you not homeschool?
I never even considered homeschooling. 17 8.37%
I don't think homeschool provides adequate socialization. 26 12.81%
I don't think homeschool provides adequate academics. 12 5.91%
It's just not practical for our family. 79 38.92%
Other (please explain). 69 33.99%
Voters: 203. You may not vote on this poll

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#121 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 02:18 AM
 
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Hi I would like to give you some information about how to apply Montessori methods in a home learning environment. Check out www.montessoriboard.com
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#122 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 07:53 AM
 
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When I was invesitgating homeschooling, I had a lot of really important and really critical questions, many of which were about education and socialization and I found conversations that were critical to homeschooling, especially those where people who had not-so-good experiences with homeschooling were sharing their thoughts, shut down in exactly this way. I think it's a huge liability for homeschooling and definately put me as a concerned parent off the issue.
If it doesn't apply to your situation and you have no outside experience then why should it be addressed? If you live in a very rural community with a low crime rate in the heart of the Midwest and someone says, "I can't believe you send your child to school! Aren't you worried about gang activity?" your answer would likely be, "There isn't a gang problem in this community."

Some situations just don't apply. I don't have to worry about my (homeschooled) kids being indoctrinated with religion as fact, or kept at home around the kitchen table, or being isolated from those of a different color or religion--all criticisms *I* have seen about homeschooling. Why should I spend a lot of time defending myself--even in my mind--against arguments that have no bearing on my individual circumstance?

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#123 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 04:50 PM
 
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I don't think it is her perspective people are taking issues with. I think it is more with the fact that she attempted to position herself as an expert both in homeschooling (when in fact her child went to school at age 6), and on Sociology and Cultural Anthropology. Using her expertise as her premise she then makes sweeping statements about how socializing in small groups will cause problems later on, or that all homeschool groups are homogeneous, or how school is the only place for children to acquire cultural literacy.
Thanks, but you know what? I can work out how much weight to give to different perspectives without needing to have others point that out for me. But now we have a whole bunch of other people trying to position themselves as better and more complete experts than others rather than sharing their perspectives, without answering or respecting the original question and the conversation that grew up around it. And I can decide how much -or really, how little- weight to give to those perspectives as well.
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#124 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 05:04 PM
 
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Thanks, but you know what? I can work out how much weight to give to different perspectives without needing to have others point that out for me. But now we have a whole bunch of other people trying to position themselves as better and more complete experts than others rather than sharing their perspectives, without answering or respecting the original question and the conversation that grew up around it. And I can decide how much -or really, how little- weight to give to those perspectives as well.
I don't doubt your ability to make your own assessments and weigh which perspectives and opinions you agree with. But I also don't think that those who have different and perhaps broader experiences than Aura Kitten should be discouraged from speaking up when they see stereotypes and generalizations being stated as fact. All experiences are valid are they not? And wrt to critical thinking, part of the process is to weigh the source and their biases against their opinions. As Aura Kitten positioned herself as an expert, it makes perfect sense that someone with similar background and an opposing views outlines what their background is does it not? No one is telling you what to believe - they are simply (and respectfully) adding more information to the discussion so that those who are open to the topic can explore more. I don't see any harm in that.

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#125 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 08:32 PM
 
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Wow I didn't realize so many people were hatin' on my contributions to this thread.


You all would have been horrified the last few class sessions of my sociology class ~ the professor has made it abundantly clear why Homeschooling is detrimental to children in society.


But it seems like the hs'ers responding to this thread don't want facts, they want to preserve their ideology with whatever supports their beliefs.



Do you think it was easy for me to accept the notion that homeschooling was detrimental, when I myself had been an avid home-schooler for a number of years?



Geesh.
This thread is just ridiculous.

ETA ~ I am not just here to "spout off stereotypes as facts," but to share what I have come to learn over the years. You can agree or not agree.
I also did NOT "attempt to position myself as an expert" ~ what a stupid ASSumption.

This is a thread about WHY we made the personal decision to NOT homeschool, the last time I checked. It was not "let's tear down the decisions and evidence driving those decisions of people who have chosen not to homeschool their children."

*Unsubcribing*
I have more important things to do with my time then try to educate narrow minded people who only want to argue.
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#126 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 09:55 PM
 
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[QUOTE=Aura_Kitten;8194033

You all would have been horrified the last few class sessions of my sociology class ~ t
. [/QUOTE]

Omgosh, and here I was thinking you might be a disgruntled community college teacher or something. You're an undergrad.
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#127 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 10:09 PM
 
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It looks like the last few posts are part of an interesting discussion/debate, but no time to read that now...

My daughter is only 1, but she will probably go to public school. She can go to the school for the town we live in (bleh) or the town I teach in (). I got lucky and got a job in an excellent school that I would love to have her go to. We could homeschool with dh being a WAHD, but I see no reason to with our school options. Also, eventually she'll be in my class for 2 years, so I would be teaching her anyway!
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#128 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 10:11 PM
 
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You all would have been horrified the last few class sessions of my sociology class ~ the professor has made it abundantly clear why Homeschooling is detrimental to children in society.


What college are you attending? I strongly suggest you transfer.
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#129 of 174 Old 05-22-2007, 10:33 PM
 
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You all would have been horrified the last few class sessions of my sociology class ~ the professor has made it abundantly clear why Homeschooling is detrimental to children in society.
Aura Kitten,
Is this just the opinion of your professor, or is it based on research? If it is based on research, I am sincerely interested in reading this research for myself. Please let me know how and where I can get a hold of this research. Thanks!
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#130 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 12:11 AM
 
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My son wants to play with kids daily.. and not just his siblings... we dont have ANY kids his age in the neighborhood and playdates just dont do him justice.. he wants an all day playdate LOL.. so we are going to try preschool this next year.. we may homeschool him in the future or we may do his siblings or whatever.. we are just going to play it by ear for each child and do what is best for each individual
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#131 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 12:33 AM
 
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We've done both. Ds prefers school. He is really smart and sees the pros and cons in both, but for him school wins out. So I let him go. Do I hate it a lot? Yes. Do I appreciate the friendships he has made and the learning he has done (in particular, how to cope with suddenly having 8 different teachers with 8 different sets of expectations and assignments)? Yes

I haven't decided what to do with the girls yet. I think I will homeschool them, but at some point they will decide to go to school like big brother.
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#132 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 12:39 AM
 
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We have a great Montessori program that my boys are enrolled in. So, homeschooling isn't necessary for us. Montessori provides a much richer, more constructed atmosphere for my boys that I could never give them. I'm really happy with where they are right now. When they get to high school, then they can choose what they want, and if they want to be homeschooled, I will. It would be easier for me then anyway, just based on preference and education.
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#133 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 05:29 PM
 
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One of our main reasons is because we want dd to have a truly multi-cultural, multi-lingual education.
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And that is precisely why WE homeschool.
: How many cultures can you represent homeschooling? To me that is the exact reason to NOT homeschool... people really thinking they can expose their kids daily to the cultures of the world by keeping them at home. How many languages (spoken by a native speaker) are your kids exposed to on a daily basis? How many different ethnic foods do they get to sample? How many different ethnic holidays do they celebrate every year?

Over 70 countries and languages are represented in my dd's international school. She'll also get a degree recognized by the ministries of education in France, Canada, all of Latin America, Spain, and some African countries. Somehow I doubt that your homeschooling curriculum is approved at that level.
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#134 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 05:45 PM
 
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: How many cultures can you represent homeschooling? To me that is the exact reason to NOT homeschool... people really thinking they can expose their kids daily to the cultures of the world by keeping them at home. How many languages (spoken by a native speaker) are your kids exposed to on a daily basis? How many different ethnic foods do they get to sample? How many different ethnic holidays do they celebrate every year?

Over 70 countries and languages are represented in my dd's international school. She'll also get a degree recognized by the ministries of education in France, Canada, all of Latin America, Spain, and some African countries. Somehow I doubt that your homeschooling curriculum is approved at that level.
: The ignorance and classism. Where to begin.

If "my" child went to school, he would not be going to a la-di-dah international school with 70 countries represented. He'd be going to a low-income, failing, 98% white school on the edge of a not-quite-major city. He'd be exposed daily to racism and narrowmindedness.

With homeschooling, ds doesn't get "daily" interaction with people from 70 different countries, but he does get a much more integrated experience. He goes to homeschool gym class, where his friends are "from" all over the world. He meets Darfur refugees at our little branch library, muslim kids at his music class, children from China and Ethiopia at church, hispanic kids on our street....and in all this he has zero exposure to racist attitudes that I know are rife among the low-income white people of this community.
Also, we use a homeschool curriculum that has a focus on making sure the children don't have a white european male worldview. In his daily studies, the children in his school books are very diverse in regards to gender, race, country, income level, and religion.

I am doing the absolute most that I can to raise a white child in a mostly-white, low income part of town to see himself as part of the big, wide world where people come in a rainbow of colors. So far, so good! I can take him anywhere and see the same result: he easily makes friends wherever he goes. He doesn't "see" barriers that our society often encourages. My chosen task would be impossible if I took him down to the local school and signed him up.

Now, if I were rich or happened to live next to a school like your child's, I wouldn't have to arrange playdates and drive my son all over town to find friends. Aren't you priviledged that your child can go to such a fine school? If your lot in life ever lessens, you should consider homeschooling.
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#135 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 05:57 PM
 
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: The ignorance and classism. Where to begin.

If "my" child went to school, he would not be going to a la-d-dah international school with 70 countries represented. He'd be going to a low-income, failing, 98% white school on the edge of a not-quite-major city. He'd be exposed daily to racism and narrowmindedness.
70% of the kids that go to this school, do so on some sort of scholarship. Every single "class" is represented in this school. It truly is the picture of diversity. It's not "la-d-dah", it's quite the opposite. Some people always have to find a way to try to shoot down something that's a good thing.

I'm damn glad that my dd gets to go to a school like this. If you don't have one, or your kids don't attend one, there's no need to have an attitude about it. My point is that the reason we don't homeschool is because dd has a chance to go to a school like this. We've not always lived in the US and we probably won't during dd's entire education. Go back and read my first post. Perhaps then you'll understand why having 4 or more languages and multiple cultures are in important to us.

It has nothing to do with our lot in life. We sacrifice every single day to pay our portion of her tuition. Why don't you keep your stereotyping to yourself because you haven't even the slightest clue what we have to do to have her in this school. The sacrifice is WORTH it to me because dd spends every school day with kids and teachers from all over the world... both the poor ones and the rich ones, AIDS orphans, and rich doctor's kids, black, white, and every other color of the rainbow. I'm sorry but I don't see how homeschooling can offer anything close to that.

As for playdates... we don't have playdates - we live 45 minutes from the school!! Dd has plenty of friends right here in town to play with. What does that have to do with homeschooling or not, anyway? Like homeschoolers don't set playdates with kids? Geesh!! Take the chip off of your shoulder.

ETA: Oh, and before we knew dd could go to this school, I looked into homeschooling. Every, single homeschool group I contacted and met with were 100% white, middle-class, protestant. Imagine how many sideways looks I got when I said that my husband is Middle Eastern, non-christian, and we are bilingual at home. If I HOMESCHOOLED, there would be 0 diversity. And diversity for us, in this white-bread town, is more important than anything concerning education. School is the ONLY place dd is exposed to diversity.
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#136 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 07:22 PM
 
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: How many cultures can you represent homeschooling? To me that is the exact reason to NOT homeschool... people really thinking they can expose their kids daily to the cultures of the world by keeping them at home. How many languages (spoken by a native speaker) are your kids exposed to on a daily basis? How many different ethnic foods do they get to sample? How many different ethnic holidays do they celebrate every year?

Over 70 countries and languages are represented in my dd's international school. She'll also get a degree recognized by the ministries of education in France, Canada, all of Latin America, Spain, and some African countries. Somehow I doubt that your homeschooling curriculum is approved at that level.
Sounds like you've found a wonderful school that fits the needs of you and your family. Hats off to ya.

I still wouldn't send my kids, though. Bad kids-to-teacher ratio, lack of freedom to make individual curriculum, lack of family freedom to vacation whenever, kids still have to get up too early (IMO), peer-orientation issues would still occur, peer-pressure issues, classroom pressure to make everyone conform to the mean, teaching to tests, etc. etc. etc. etc.

I live in a culturally rich area. So in anwer to some of your questions above...my kids are exposed to about 8 foreign languages on a daily basis. She plays with friends from Serbia, Brazil, Ecuador, China, Italy, Germany, Canada (Frnech speakers), and India on an almost-daily basis. As far as foods, we eat out at different types of restaurants here and in nearby NYC on a semi-regular basis. Also, we try out recipies at home. My kids are too little to care about any holidays except for Christmas, but next year I plan on explaining/celebrating holidays from around the world.

Really, it's easy to incorporate this stuff into your everyday lives if you live close enough to a city. Homeschoolers aren't exactly home staring at their four walls all day long.
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#137 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 08:53 PM
 
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Well RedWine, cultural diversity is more important than any of those things you listed. IMHO, at some point in her life, she's going to have peer pressure. I'd rather her experience it, and learn to deal with it when the stakes aren't as high as they will be once she leaves home. I'd rather her deal with peer pressure first when she is being challenged about her shoes, or her homework, or teasing another classmate, and not when she is being challenged to try street drugs or random sex. As for vacation, we are restricted not by dd's classes, but by the fact that my dh is a professor and we can go only when HIS schedule permits (which is almost identical to dd's). You are in the same situation, no? Getting up early... she gets up early anyway. At least when she goes to school, *I* get to go back to sleep. Oh, and the school does have tests, but I'm one of those rare people that believe that homework (and lots of it) and tests are good. Even if I homeschooled, we'd be having tests. Thankfully, dd's school doesn't do any standardized testing until the kids are about to enter the International Baccalaureate program in high school.

As far as language goes... being exposed to a language does nothing toward fluency. A kid might pick up "yes", "no" and count to 10, but any passive exposure to language is useless. I studied language acquisition as an undergrad, and really the only thing that is useful at this age (5) is immersion. I've posted over on the gifted forum about my dd's language abilities, and it really has come only from immersion. Her first 3 anyway. Her 4th language is only passive fluency now, but it was acquired through immersion. By the time she is able to acquire language through rote teaching, she'll have grown beyond the "Critical Period" and will not be able to acquire it like a native speaker. This is EXTREMELY important to us that she be multilingual, not just to be able to ask where the bathroom is, but to converse on all levels that a native speaker does. You just can't provide that through homeschooling unless there is a secondary (or tertiary) language spoken in the home using a proven method such as OPAL (one parent, one language).

And as for NYC being nearby (as I recall, you said you're in Cambridge... my dh is an MIT grad, so we know the area), I wouldn't call that very nearby, but if you have ready access to it (via train, I assume), then that's great! We have Chicago that nearby, but we don't go there often enough to really have much exposure to the cultural diversity there.
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#138 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:08 PM
 
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Well RedWine, cultural diversity is more important .

While I think your experience is nice, (and better most) you do not seem to want to understand what homeschoolers get to experience outside the confines of one classroom.

I am glad your school is working for you. Your way is not wrong, and our way is right for us, which doesn't stop at academics, or the learning of another language or two.

The fact is, what we get in our daily lives, in a natural way, is rocking. I know you don't see that.

We are very blessed to have an awesome opportunity to be free *and* learn.
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#139 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:17 PM
 
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I cannot for the life of me figure out how this turned into a homeschooling debate.

Don't the homeschoolers have their own forum where they can spout ps'ing stereotypes like this:

Quote:
Originally Posted by RedWine View Post
Bad kids-to-teacher ratio, lack of freedom to make individual curriculum, lack of family freedom to vacation whenever, kids still have to get up too early (IMO), peer-orientation issues would still occur, peer-pressure issues, classroom pressure to make everyone conform to the mean, teaching to tests, etc. etc. etc. etc.
I mean, honestly, none of this happens at our little, alternative, public school. So implying it happens everywhere is therefore a stereotype....I thought we were all working on avoiding that.

Jen, former attorney and now SAHM to 11 yo ds and 8 yo ds

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#140 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:26 PM
 
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(Sensing possible thread lockdown...)
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#141 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:36 PM
 
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: How many cultures can you represent homeschooling? To me that is the exact reason to NOT homeschool... people really thinking they can expose their kids daily to the cultures of the world by keeping them at home. How many languages (spoken by a native speaker) are your kids exposed to on a daily basis? How many different ethnic foods do they get to sample? How many different ethnic holidays do they celebrate every year?
International schools are wonderful and your DD is so lucky to have the opportunity to attend one. However, unfortunately most children aren't this lucky in the states. My DH is a teacher (I'm an ex-school guidance counselor turned SAHM) and has taught in several states at different schools and based on that I would never allow my child to attend a public stateside school (even several private schools). In most schools children are exposed to maybe three cultures depending on where they live, they are exposed to mostly English and some broken Spanish, Ethnic foods--not really, and Ethnic holidays. . .rarely. As far as the socialization argument so many here are using, I hate to tell you but your children would probably get more socialization at home with you than at school. A lot of schools have no talking during lunch rules, in most classrooms children aren't allowed to talk with one another, and a lot of schools only have one recess of maybe at most 20 minutes. I am not saying this is ALL schools, just most of them DH and I have worked in. I honestly never thought I would send my DC to school until coming to Japan where I found a kindergarten and possibly an elementary school that jive with my ideals. If we do decide to homeschool my children will still be exposed to a minimum of three languages, many different cultures, several different religions celebrating many holidays. Of course we do live in Japan and have access to a military base where there is a lot of diversity--much more than in the town we moved from in the states. I do think many homeschoolers have the same goals that you have. They want to expose their children to the world and feel the best way to do this is to homeschool. Many don't just follow a boxed curriculum or just have school at home, they expose their children to many things outside the home. Children still get peer pressure even when homeschooled. . .they still have friends and peers their own age because most homeschooling families belong to some kind of group (even if not a homeschooling group) to expose their children to other children. I don't think the peer pressure is probably as intense as it would be in a school setting, which IMO is a good thing. As far as a pp suggesting that a homeschooled child without the proper school peer pressure being more likely to try drugs, etc. . . I really think that is stretching. I would feel it is more likely having parents who are too controlling and having a need to rebel or find love in the wrong places. . .it has nothing to do with homeschooling.

Barbara:  an always learning SAHM of Ilana (11) and Aiden (8) living in Belgium with my amazing husband.

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#142 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:36 PM
 
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Well RedWine, cultural diversity is more important than any of those things you listed. IMHO, at some point in her life, she's going to have peer pressure. I'd rather her experience it, and learn to deal with it when the stakes aren't as high as they will be once she leaves home. I'd rather her deal with peer pressure first when she is being challenged about her shoes, or her homework, or teasing another classmate, and not when she is being challenged to try street drugs or random sex. As for vacation, we are restricted not by dd's classes, but by the fact that my dh is a professor and we can go only when HIS schedule permits (which is almost identical to dd's). You are in the same situation, no? Getting up early... she gets up early anyway. At least when she goes to school, *I* get to go back to sleep. Oh, and the school does have tests, but I'm one of those rare people that believe that homework (and lots of it) and tests are good. Even if I homeschooled, we'd be having tests. Thankfully, dd's school doesn't do any standardized testing until the kids are about to enter the International Baccalaureate program in high school.

As far as language goes... being exposed to a language does nothing toward fluency. A kid might pick up "yes", "no" and count to 10, but any passive exposure to language is useless. I studied language acquisition as an undergrad, and really the only thing that is useful at this age (5) is immersion. I've posted over on the gifted forum about my dd's language abilities, and it really has come only from immersion. Her first 3 anyway. Her 4th language is only passive fluency now, but it was acquired through immersion. By the time she is able to acquire language through rote teaching, she'll have grown beyond the "Critical Period" and will not be able to acquire it like a native speaker. This is EXTREMELY important to us that she be multilingual, not just to be able to ask where the bathroom is, but to converse on all levels that a native speaker does. You just can't provide that through homeschooling unless there is a secondary (or tertiary) language spoken in the home using a proven method such as OPAL (one parent, one language).

And as for NYC being nearby (as I recall, you said you're in Cambridge... my dh is an MIT grad, so we know the area), I wouldn't call that very nearby, but if you have ready access to it (via train, I assume), then that's great! We have Chicago that nearby, but we don't go there often enough to really have much exposure to the cultural diversity there.
Yes, I agree cultural diversity is very important. I addressed that in my post. We have lots of it!

As far as language goes...yes, we take it seriously as well! I don't believe that immersion is THE only way to learn a language, however. It certainly helps, though -- and we have plans every year to spend months in various countries, to help our kids with their language acquisition (we will start this when our youngest is 5). I also studied the "critical window" "research" as an undergrad, and briefly as a grad student. In fact, I've had lovely conversations with Pinker regarding my views on the adult capacity to learn language -- I feel there are many flaws within that "critical period" paradigm. Really -- drop off an adult in a foreign country, and they learn to speak the language within 5-7 years (just as a child does, growing up in that culture). They learn to speak it fluently, without an accent. I've seen this personally with my sister, I've seen it personally with grad students who have spent years in the field. So, though I know it's fashionable, I don't really buy into the "early-acquisition" viewpoint.

We'll have to disagree on the peer pressure issue. I feel that if a child feels secure within her/himself, they are better able to resist negative peer pressure. I don't see how a child pressured to conform to the norm (as many kids feel when they attend a school) would feel strong enough within themselves to go against the grain when faced with practically ANY issue. The homeschoolers I have met have very high levels of self-esteem, and feel free to be themselves. Therefore, they don't cave to societal pressure and they don't do things that don't feel right to them.

Yes, we frequent NYC often. Cambridge, Somerville, and Boston are also extremely culturally diverse. On our street alone, we have families from the countries I listed in my last post.

We are not in the same situation as you regarding vacations. Dh travels frequently, all over the world. We can turn any one of those trips into a vacation, and save lots of money (legally) on hotels, rental cars, airfaire, etc. In addition, dh sometimes takes weeks to "work at home," writing papers...and off we all go (he writes from the road). Also, the girls and I can up and go wherever, whenever. We don't always travel together. So no, we really don't have ANY restrictions.

As for getting up early -- I meant the opposite. My kids need their sleep, that's very important at this age (any age, really)! I don't want to force my kids into an unnatural sleep-pattern that would probably wreck havoc with their ability to optimally process information.

We differ on the views of homework and tests. I don't need to test my kids. I am with them, I have a very good idea of what they know and don't know. I hear dd1 when she reads, I see her work through her math problems (she's 4, but she's gifted so we do a lot of academics...at her request). I can tell when she doesn't get something. Maybe as she grows, I'll feel the need to change that, who knows. Of course, as she nears her teenage years I will make sure she is used to taking tests, for the sake of college entrance exams.

So again -- kudos for finding an education system that best fits you and yours. However, as with ANY system of education, what is best for you is most definitely NOT best for everyone. You feel what you have is the bees' knees. And I wouldn't trade what we have, and our own opportunities, for anything on the planet. So we both win.
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#143 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:41 PM
 
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I mean, honestly, none of this happens at our little, alternative, public school. So implying it happens everywhere is therefore a stereotype....I thought we were all working on avoiding that.
You're right -- I don't mean to imply that all institutionalized schools are anything. And NO ONE has stated that homeschooling is better than institutional schools. I originally posted to dispel horrible untruths and jaded myths (they were untruths in my experience, and in the experience of many other MDC homeschooling mamas).

As far as what I wrote concerning institution schools -- I won't accept a kid-to-teacher ratio greater than 3:1, and I'd have to keep my family on the school schedule. That pretty much covers most of what I wrote.
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#144 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:42 PM
 
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(Sensing possible thread lockdown...)
If it means anything, I do vote lockdown. :
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#145 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 09:55 PM
 
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Just one comment... after puberty, it is very, very rare to acquire a second language without an accent. Much of it is physiological - vocal chords becoming more rigid for example), but this is something that's right up Prof. Pinker's alley as a psycholinguist. If you're on conversational terms with Steven Pinker, ask him about it. While they might speak fluently, it's a rare person to speak "natively" (which also includes regional dialect). I consider it to be a gift, much like having exceptional mathematical skills.
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#146 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 10:26 PM
 
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While they might speak fluently, it's a rare person to speak "natively" (which also includes regional dialect). I consider it to be a gift, much like having exceptional mathematical skills.
Okay, good point -- it is important to us that our kids speak fluently, with little to no accent. We don't care if they speak natively. So in that, we have different goals.

And I meant it -- I really am glad you have a school that you are very happy with. It does sound like an exceptional place.
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#147 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 10:42 PM
 
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we were going to homeschool, but DH compromised with me and asked for DD to try montessori and she has only been there in the camp program for 3 weeks...just twice a week and she is just beyond excited about it. I have never seen her like this. She jumps up and down at the door as I'm rushing to get ready in the AM. We are eyeing an immersion school for elementary, and I know it means a lot to Dh that they be fluent. But we are leaving the door open to homeschooling if DD decides it is what she wants. DS might be totally different, who knows!

"Parents are simply trustees; they do not own the bodies of their children"-Norm Cohen  Martial arts instructor intactlact.gifhomebirth.jpgnak.gif and mom to 4: DD1 (1/05) DS (7/06) DD2 (5/08) DD3 (2/11)
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#148 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 10:43 PM
 
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Just one comment... after puberty, it is very, very rare to acquire a second language without an accent. Much of it is physiological - vocal chords becoming more rigid for example), but this is something that's right up Prof. Pinker's alley as a psycholinguist. If you're on conversational terms with Steven Pinker, ask him about it. While they might speak fluently, it's a rare person to speak "natively" (which also includes regional dialect). I consider it to be a gift, much like having exceptional mathematical skills.
So what? What is wrong with speaking another language with a bit of an accent? don't know *any* people who've picked up perfect grammatical English without a bit of an accent from their native land. What's the freaking big deal about that? Hello? Get over that.

I'll aquiece that it might be an issue in other countries, particularly France. But most folks get that people who aren't native have accents. Accents do not mean you do not understand the langauge or can't speak it fluently. That others are nasty about it just means others are nastly about it. It's not like English with cute accents isn't cool. It so is . :

Accents shmactments. Whoppee doo.

Give me a break about that.
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#149 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 10:46 PM
 
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Okay, good point -- it is important to us that our kids speak fluently, with little to no accent. We don't care if they speak natively. So in that, we have different goals.

And I meant it -- I really am glad you have a school that you are very happy with. It does sound like an exceptional place.

Well.

My dh does international biz as a rule. We've never met anyone from any country who does not speak English with an accent from their native country. And an accent is not, in itself, a detriment. Neither is speaking another language with a less than stellar native accent, or even with an English/American accent. Attitude is everything.
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#150 of 174 Old 05-23-2007, 10:51 PM
 
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Just one comment... after puberty, it is very, very rare to acquire a second language without an accent. Much of it is physiological - vocal chords becoming more rigid for example), but this is something that's right up Prof. Pinker's alley as a psycholinguist. If you're on conversational terms with Steven Pinker, ask him about it. While they might speak fluently, it's a rare person to speak "natively" (which also includes regional dialect). I consider it to be a gift, much like having exceptional mathematical skills.
I can tell your kids are very young.

The world is larger than you think it is.
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