Teachers not taking kids outside daily because it is too cold - Page 3 - Mothering Forums
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#61 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 11:23 AM
 
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Expecially since places like TX and FL and VA get swletering in summer and the children can't go out there then, either.
Yep. That's when we stay inside -- June-Sept! In the evenings, when the sun starts to set and the temps drop to a chilly 90F, we don't go outside w/o covering our bodies in poison because of the mosquitoes. (We've tried the natural stuff. Our mosquitoes mock us for it.) It's a no win for outdoor play in the summer unless you're swimming. Even then, by the end of summer the pools start to feel more like bathtubs.

My DD's preschool they have stayed indoors on days I wished they'd gone out. Usually it's because it's cold (40s) and windy and overcast. I sent her to school one day last week with just a light sweater. I thought it was going to warm up into the 60s by mid-morning. All morning temps were in the 40s. Her teacher took her out in just the sweater and she was fine. By 1pm when I picked her up it was close to 80F. Freaky, freaky weather.
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#62 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 11:33 AM
 
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You're probably right.

20 minutes of fresh air would likely cure all of that and solve world hunger too.

I think this thread has gotten a bit dramatic to say the least.
No kidding. All this and all the kids in Norway are beautiful and healthy?! Wow I should move there.

Obesity rates in the south are high because poverty rates are high in the South. Unhealthy crap is a lot cheaper than healthy food. So children eat crap and it makes them obese. There are other issues as well. Now my child's school does take them outside pretty much everyday and I'm in the South. There are still plenty of overweight kids. For that matter my own daughter is overweight on the scales though just very solid to my eye. She is very active; she's just built like her father. Oh and she's not on ritalin.
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#63 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 11:47 AM
 
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No kidding. All this and all the kids in Norway are beautiful and healthy?! Wow I should move there.

Obesity rates in the south are high because poverty rates are high in the South. Unhealthy crap is a lot cheaper than healthy food. So children eat crap and it makes them obese. There are other issues as well. Now my child's school does take them outside pretty much everyday and I'm in the South. There are still plenty of overweight kids. For that matter my own daughter is overweight on the scales though just very solid to my eye. She is very active; she's just built like her father. Oh and she's not on ritalin.

No, where all the children are above average. Isn't Norway like Lake Wobegon? http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/qu...nke137097.html

20 minutes a day playing outside would go a long way, and might help them work off some of that crap. George Bush doesn't care, so we have to care. If you think keeping children inside is healthy, it makes sense to think that 20 minutes playing is worthless. If you understand keeping children inside day after day is not in their best health interests--mentally or physically- you demand better.

Accepting ignorance about children's health from school boards isn't going to help our kids.
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#64 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 12:10 PM
 
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You know...35F doesn't mean a lot. The windchill is what matters on how cold you feel...
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#65 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 12:31 PM
 
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I find that ridiculous. My children's daycare goes out down to -10C.

Perhaps you can work with your daycare to get every class enough back up outdoor clothing. My daycare also insists INSISTS that every parent have certain clothing every daycare day depending on the weather and season. At least for 45 minutes a day and often for 45 minutes in the morning and another 45 - 1.5 in the afternoon.

The outdoor component of the program is integral to the program. If parents cannot provide, they are requested to see the program director so that the issue can be addressed and the children will continue to play outside.

When it is rainy and muddy, rain pants and rain jacket and rain boots. If it is still cool out, fleece underneath. In cold, snow pants, jacket, warm hat, and two pairs of mitts (in case one set get to wet) and a warm pair of boots. In spring and fall, a light insulated wind jacket. Also to be taken for cool summer days and mornings.

Dress for super hot days in the summer. And it does get roasting hot sometimes here. Where I live can and does go from being -20C to +20C in a couple of hours. In the summer you can start the morning at +5C and end the day at +37C.


CHALLENGING your body to adapt to weather isn't inhumane. It is a necessity, and protecting your child from weather changes is NOT helping them in the long run. It is hindering their body's development.

Oh - and generally children aren't nearly as wimpy as adults.
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#66 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 12:42 PM
 
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CHALLENGING your body to adapt to weather isn't inhumane. It is a necessity, and protecting your child from weather changes is NOT helping them in the long run. It is hindering their body's development.
While I agree that 45F isn't *that* cold, like some of the PPs have said, and I wouldn't want my kid cooped up inside all day, it's important to remember that it's relative to what your body is accustomed to. I don't hear of nearly as many heat-related deaths out of the south in the summer as I do out of the north. I don't think people who live up north can withstand the sustained heat (and sometimes humidity) the way we can. Again, it's relative to what your body is used to.
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#67 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 12:51 PM
 
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Oh, I don't know...say compared to some other cold place...like Norway? Where all the children are beautiful and above average. And tall. :
I got that.
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#68 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 12:58 PM
 
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I got that.
lol Thank you. My children say I have an odd sense of humor that takes people a few beats to adapt. Ya think? :
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#69 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 01:03 PM
 
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live up north can withstand the sustained heat (and sometimes humidity) the way we can. Again, it's relative to what your body is used to.
And unless you play outside during childhood, you're not going to get a chance to adapt or get used to it. Do I *like* going out to feed the chickens when there is 10 inches of crusty snow on the ground (this is why attached barns are great and AMy D you were right to wait for that!) and it's below freezing, with a with a good windchill off the ocean? No. Will I die before I get to the barn? No. Why not? Layers. Many layers. I peel them off when I get to the barn and get to work. Will my body ever adapt to this cold to the point I don't need my layers? No, never. But chickens got to eat, and kids gotta play.

I am up for contributing to a coat drive to a school in the scuth or where-ever. If you are a parent in a school where many children do not have coats for the cooler weather, and are starting a coat drive, I can send a couple of items.
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#70 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 01:13 PM
 
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While I agree that 45F isn't *that* cold, like some of the PPs have said, and I wouldn't want my kid cooped up inside all day, it's important to remember that it's relative to what your body is accustomed to. I don't hear of nearly as many heat-related deaths out of the south in the summer as I do out of the north. I don't think people who live up north can withstand the sustained heat (and sometimes humidity) the way we can. Again, it's relative to what your body is used to.
I had to google this-- The highest rate of heat--related deaths:

During 1999-2003, a total of 3,442 deaths resulting from exposure to extreme heat were reported (annual mean: 688). For 2,239 (65%) of these deaths, the underlying cause of death was recorded as exposure to excessive heat; for the remaining 1,203 (35%), hyperthermia was recorded as a contributing factor. Deaths among males accounted for 66% of deaths and outnumbered deaths among females in all age groups (Figure). Of the 3,401 decedents for whom age information was available, 228 (7%) were aged <15 years, 1,810 (53%) were aged 15-64 years, and 1,363 (40%) were aged ≥65 years. The state with the highest average annual hyperthermia-related death rate during 1999-2003 was Arizona (1.7 deaths per 100,000 population), followed by Nevada (0.8) and Missouri (0.6).


I am going to keep checking, because I now wonder if more people in the north die heat-related dates over those folks in Southern states. That's an interesting thought.
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#71 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 01:33 PM
 
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I am going to keep checking, because I now wonder if more people in the north die heat-related dates over those folks in Southern states. That's an interesting thought.
Well, darn, now I wonder too. Maybe they're reported on more because extreme heat waves are rare in the north so it seems like more deaths happen even though more deaths actually happen in the south?? Seriously, when I hear about them I wonder if those people realize how much water they need to consume to stay healthy in the heat, esp if they are outside and/or exercising. Sorta like you and the layers. No, I don't know how to layer properly because we don't need to do that here. I just sent my 5 yr old to Chicago for the weekend with her grandparents. I had no idea how to pack her for that trip. On the flip-side, if you're not used to the heat I can see how it would be easy to overheat quickly. I spent two months in Kenya back in college. I lived out in the bush doing aid work, no a/c. When I got home (June) it was in the 100s, but the heat didn't bother me because I was used to it.

ETA: I do understand the basic concept of layering. What I would have to learn by experience is how much to layer for different weather conditions. Temp, windchill, snow, ice, etc. Just in case you were thinking I was a complete looney...
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#72 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 01:46 PM
 
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Well, darn, now I wonder too. Maybe they're reported on more because extreme heat waves are rare in the north so it seems like more deaths happen even though more deaths actually happen in the south?? Seriously, when I hear about them I wonder if those people realize how much water they need to consume to stay healthy in the heat, esp if they are outside and/or exercising. Sorta like you and the layers. No, I don't know how to layer properly because we don't need to do that here. I just sent my 5 yr old to Chicago for the weekend with her grandparents. I had no idea how to pack her for that trip. On the flip-side, if you're not used to the heat I can see how it would be easy to overheat quickly. I spent two months in Kenya back in college. I lived out in the bush doing aid work, no a/c. When I got home (June) it was in the 100s, but the heat didn't bother me because I was used to it.
I am thinking availability of air conditioning is going to be a major factor, and perhaps the stats break down along economic lines. (As usual, kwim?) Was it two years ago where all of those elderly people died in france? And it was partially blamed on lack of AC.

I layer because I have to work in there. If I wear a big puffy coat, I can't move well. So, I do my longjohns, jeans, top, sweater, coat, hat- I love a hat, and work gloves, depending. Then I peel off as I work. A child in playing outside now in Chicago probably needs a long john shirt, another shirt, maybe a T-neck over, leggings or tights, pants, snow pants (my youngest dd likes to wear long johns and tights, no pants under her snowpants), jacket that is not too puffy so they can move, warm socks, boots. . You can add a fleece vest, if needed. Sometimes layers , the vest, a neck gator, and a hat will do fine. It depends on wind and what you're doing. I am sure loving grandparents will keep her toasty.

ETA-- Your Kenya story reminded me of my college roomie who spent 8 months in India, including the entire summer. She said she learned early on to avoid AC as the heat felt unbearable after spending time in AC buildings. Staying away from AC helped her emotionaly and physically handle the heat better...or so she said.
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#73 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 01:54 PM
 
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Hey Mommyoftwo how ya been?

What do the other teachers do? Is it only your dd's class that stays in when it's "too cold" or is it a school wide policy?

At my B's school (same as gorzong I believe) they go outside everyday. B does not like it cold, though! She would be happy to stay inside all day, but that's not really an option. I went and took her a hat and mittens and scarf and fuzzy boots yesterday 'cause it was so cold in the morning. I noticed today that she left her hat and mittens in the car, but I'm feeling moderately cr@ppy so I just let her tough it out today.

What did they do when you were teaching?

I think in the South we don't really wanna wear all those bulky layers and we really just want it to warm back up unless of course it's snowing in which case we declare a city-wide holiday and bundle up in all our coldest weather gear to make teensy little snowmen in the 1-inch dusting we got .

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#74 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 02:54 PM
 
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I think in the South we don't really wanna wear all those bulky layers and we really just want it to warm back up unless of course it's snowing in which case we declare a city-wide holiday and bundle up in all our coldest weather gear to make teensy little snowmen in the 1-inch dusting we got .

LOL Just a long sleeve- T and hoodie, then. Take the hoodie off when it's 70 by noon.
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#75 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 04:06 PM
 
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What is our childhood Diabetes rate? Oh, I don't know...say compared to some other cold place...like Norway? Where all the children are beautiful and above average. And tall. :
Actually Scandinavian countries have the highest rate of type 1 diabetes (which is commonly referred to as childhood or juvenile diabetes), but that doesn't have anything to do with exercise since it's an autoimmune disease
I grew up in a cold climate, we exercised in a huge indoor gym. I can't imagine not doing that to burn off energy!
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#76 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 04:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hey Mommyoftwo how ya been?
What do the other teachers do? Is it only your dd's class that stays in when it's "too cold" or is it a school wide policy?
At my B's school (same as gorzong I believe) they go outside everyday. B does not like it cold, though!
What did they do when you were teaching?
I think in the South we don't really wanna wear all those bulky layers and we really just want it to warm back up unless of course it's snowing in which case we declare a city-wide holiday and bundle up in all our coldest weather gear to make teensy little snowmen in the 1-inch dusting we got .
We are doing great-just gearing up for the holidays and a bit of traveling. How about you?


Great question. I don't know. Another concern is that they have been watching movies a bit more that usual instead of playing. Oh well, break is in a day so it doesn't matter.

Little man goes outside daily at preschool too. None of the parents complain.

What did they do when you were teaching?
I taught middle school so they were getting too cool to play a whole lot but I believe that we did go outside just about everyday for 20 minutes.


I am sooo hoping for even a dusting this year so we can make little snowmen. We have a picture of our teensy snowman and snowdog from last year. Maybe we'll at least see some snow when we drive up north next week.

Anyway, who would have thought that a thread about the weather would get so long and heated!
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#77 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 05:35 PM
 
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Actually Scandinavian countries have the highest rate of type 1 diabetes (which is commonly referred to as childhood or juvenile diabetes), but that doesn't have anything to do with exercise since it's an autoimmune disease
I grew up in a cold climate, we exercised in a huge indoor gym. I can't imagine not doing that to burn off energy!
I did not know that about Norway. So sickly, tall and above average. Bummer.
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#78 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 05:39 PM
 
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I did not know that about Norway. So sickly, tall and above average. Bummer.
I know, I'm half norwegian and got a diabetic kid, thanx mom
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#79 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 05:40 PM
 
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I know, I'm half norwegian and got a diabetic kid, thanx mom
Aw, poor mom. Check it out--

http://findarticles.com/p/articles/m...22/ai_74435257
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#80 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 05:43 PM
 
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Actually Scandinavian countries have the highest rate of type 1 diabetes (which is commonly referred to as childhood or juvenile diabetes), but that doesn't have anything to do with exercise since it's an autoimmune disease
I grew up in a cold climate, we exercised in a huge indoor gym. I can't imagine not doing that to burn off energy!
And I love the runners on the strollers. Makes total sense. I could have used one of those. I don't know why, but even people in cold climates of the North East US think winter might never come back, so we just do not prepare as we should.
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#81 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 05:47 PM
 
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I live in Ca where it's not really that cold (but we'll never admit it ). I teach, and as long as it's not raining, the students go out. At least for a little bit. My students have severe disabilities and many are in wheelchairs and have very little mobility. I take this into consideration. They can't warm up in the cold like we can. I might limit their time outside, but they need to get out for at least a little bit.

I think as long as kids are bundled up enough, then it should be fine. With typically developing kids, they can let teachers know if they're too cold.
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#82 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 05:49 PM
 
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thanx, I haven't read that study yet!
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#83 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 08:17 PM
 
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I am sooo hoping for even a dusting this year so we can make little snowmen. We have a picture of our teensy snowman and snowdog from last year. Maybe we'll at least see some snow when we drive up north next week.
We made a calendar of the kids this year as gifts and our January picture has E with a little teensy 12inch snowman we made with a baby carrot nose. Pretty cute and funny, too. It would be nice to have a bit more than that, but I don't know if I need the 13 inches we got when B was a toddler.

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Anyway, who would have thought that a thread about the weather would get so long and heated!
Indeedy do! Maybe see what the other classes do and just mention that your dd would love to go outside more even if it's cold. Maybe teacher thinks she's being nice keeping them in.

Have fun traveling. We're mostly staying put. Gonna do a day trip and a quick overnight. Dh is on-call for your b-day!

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#84 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 08:33 PM
 
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Reality check to the northern contributors here. Before walking to get dd from school this afternoon I checked to see what the temp was outside. It was 68 so I was debating if ds and I needed jackets. I opened the door then turned around to get our jackets on. When we got to school all the kindergarten kids were coming out to where they sit waiting for parents with their jackets on. However it's supposed to be close to 80 in 2 days. Does attempting to make your body "used to" cold weather really work when 2 days later it's going to be around 80???

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#85 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 09:06 PM
 
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I think one important factor I found with living down south as compared to the north was the humidity. It always seemed like it was humid where I was (coastal NC) and when it got down to 20-30, which as a northerner to me that's "not bad" I could not shake off that pervasive bone chilling cold.:

And of course the summers about killed me

On the flip side we'd be out running around in shorts when it was in the 50's/60's and people would look at us like we were nuts
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#86 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 10:51 PM
 
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Reality check to the northern contributors here. Before walking to get dd from school this afternoon I checked to see what the temp was outside. It was 68 so I was debating if ds and I needed jackets. I opened the door then turned around to get our jackets on. When we got to school all the kindergarten kids were coming out to where they sit waiting for parents with their jackets on. However it's supposed to be close to 80 in 2 days. Does attempting to make your body "used to" cold weather really work when 2 days later it's going to be around 80???

I would say a hoodie would be fine for 68. You can always take it off.
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#87 of 113 Old 12-18-2007, 11:58 PM
 
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I think the whole situation of so many drugged kids not getting physical activity during an entire school day *is* pretty dramatic.

What's our child Ritalin rate? What is our childhood Diabetes rate? Oh, I don't know...say compared to some other cold place...like Norway? Where all the children are beautiful and above average. And tall. :
Alrighty then.

Now 20 minutes of recess a day is going to give us all 'beautiful' and 'above average' children that are tall.

Who knew. You really should fight for legislation requiring this 20 minutes of fresh air every day if that's all it takes to create beautiful, above average, tall children.

What the heck is wrong with SHORT children, by the way?

Or less than beautiful children?

Or children of average intelligence?
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#88 of 113 Old 12-19-2007, 12:04 AM
 
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Alrighty then.

Now 20 minutes of recess a day is going to give us all 'beautiful' and 'above average' children that are tall.

Who knew. You really should fight for legislation requiring this 20 minutes of fresh air every day if that's all it takes to create beautiful, above average, tall children.

What the heck is wrong with SHORT children, by the way?

Or less than beautiful children?

Or children of average intelligence?
It's a Garrison Keillor reference. Lake Wobegon. google it and you'll see what she was talking about.
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#89 of 113 Old 12-19-2007, 09:22 AM
 
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I would say a hoodie would be fine for 68. You can always take it off.
Maybe it would be to you, but does that mean it would be to those who live in where it's rarely cold? Also what about the 50 for a high one day and 80 2-3 days later? You said your body needs to get used to cold, but there isn't much point to getting used to cold in weather like that.

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#90 of 113 Old 12-19-2007, 11:24 AM
 
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Originally Posted by s_kristina View Post
Maybe it would be to you, but does that mean it would be to those who live in where it's rarely cold? Also what about the 50 for a high one day and 80 2-3 days later? You said your body needs to get used to cold, but there isn't much point to getting used to cold in weather like that.
So, you know, stay inside for 355 days of the year.
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