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#91 of 113 Old 12-19-2007, 11:41 AM
 
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Maybe I should be clear. My kids go outside pretty much every day unless it's raining in which case our yard becomes a pond. I certainly don't think being outside is going to hurt these kids if they are dressed for the weather. However I'm also not going to force kids to go outside in temps that will make them miserable. Living at different latitudes gives people different ideas of what makes for miserable weather. My kids were playing outside in 100 weather over the summer. They just bounced in and out of the wading pool we have and had a blast. We also stay inside from 10-11 until 2-3 depending on exactly what part of the year it is. It's too big of a risk of sunburn for them to be out much during those hours. Other then that they would be happy to live outside most of the time. However they would not think that the same temps are shorts weather that many of you do. I also have to say we live about 5 miles from the Atlantic so we don't get as hot as some inland places do. We are also lucky enough to generally have a sea breeze kick up around 3-4pm cooling things off in the afternoon.

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#92 of 113 Old 12-19-2007, 03:42 PM
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I was getting irritated with DD's teachers because the kids were not going outside for recess every day. It was cold and windy, but they were talking them out every 3 days. By the time I picked her up after school, it could be 75-80 degrees or raining. Weird weather.

They would let them run around the track a couple times and then have them come in. If they didn't go outside at all, they went to the motor lab and jumped on the trampoline or played in the ball pit.

DD does not like to wear pants, only skirts or dresses, but I put tights on her and she has a jacket and gloves. We are in Austin.
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#93 of 113 Old 12-19-2007, 04:02 PM
 
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One of the things I love about DD's school is that they go outside every day, period, twice a day, unless it's pouring. I live in the deep South, btw.

However, I now feel a bit guilty because I will send DD to school on coldish days (like 50) without a winter coat and with a light fleece instead. She's a furnace. She won't wear the winter coat unless it's cold as heck (and she was born and bred here). She also won't wear gloves or a hat, so I don't bother. Hope the teachers don't think we're neglecting her.

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#94 of 113 Old 12-20-2007, 03:02 AM
 
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In theory, I very much want to bring my son outside everyday and teach him to enjoy outdoor play in all weather. I really, really want to want to go outside with him. But, I grew up in Miami where under 50 was super rare, and I just hate the cold. He is growing up in the north, and he should be learning to enjoy it.

Instead, he complains that he is too cold and wants to go in, and I can't encourage him to stay out because I am so miserable every second I am out in the cold. I think he is picking up on that, no matter how I try to hide it.

How we dress only matters so much. The cold seems to soak in no matter what. Plus, some skin is always exposed and we have to breathe cold air. Just thinking about it...:

But, I do want to change this, for both of us.

I've also noticed that my joints get super stiff in the cold, so it hurts to move around. That makes it hard to encourage fun activity, too.

I suppose the only advice anyone could give would be to dress for the cold, which I try to do, or to tough it out, which I keep failing to do.

Plus, all that clothes is so bulky!

So, it just boggles my imnd that so many people expect recess to happen year round. I just assumed it didn't happen anywhere in cold weather! Talk about culturally biased assumptions.

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#95 of 113 Old 12-20-2007, 09:50 AM
 
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I would have greatly appreciated being allowed to stay inside on cold winter days at my elementary schools. Our cut off was 10F, regardless of wind chill. It was torture.
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#96 of 113 Old 12-28-2007, 08:10 PM
 
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Our high tomorrow is supposed to be around 60. My dd was having a talk with me this afternoon about needing to wear her jacket when she goes to lunch and specials. All the classrooms have exterior exits there are no hallways at her school. I can't imagine not wearing a jacket when it's 60 out I'd be : My 2 year old ds has a habit of opening the front door if it's not dead bolted. My dd was telling me I needed to get him quick this evening because he was headed to the door and would get out. I knew it was between 50-60 outside and he would slam the door shut the moment he opened it. His pronouncement on the weather was a scrunched up face and "cold, WEIRD!" On the other hand they both think I'm a horribly evil mom if I try to keep them inside when it's 100 out. It's really what your used to.
When I lived on the coast of Oregon 60F was shorts and tank top weather.......it's what I set my thermostat at during the day in the winter time. At night we turn it off completely.

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#97 of 113 Old 12-28-2007, 10:42 PM
 
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I know where we lived in LA many schools didn't have recess when the weather was cold because so many people across the parish could not afford a warm jacket for their children. Knowing how poor most of the south is I'm inclined to think it would be similar throughout much of the south. I know of charities that just work on getting warm clothing for kids in the north, but don't know of any down here.
I grew up in Southern California. I didn't own a heavy jacket until I moved to the Bay Area, because it didn't get cold enough frequently enough to need one. On those rare cold days, it was easier to just layer up.

At my kids school, the only time the kids don't have recess is when it's pouring rain, extremely windy (to the point of flying debris) or the air quality is terrible.
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#98 of 113 Old 12-28-2007, 11:12 PM
 
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I lived in So CA for several years, and honestly, sometimes sweatshirts were overkill. At least once the clouds burned off.
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#99 of 113 Old 12-29-2007, 05:01 AM
 
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I found this quite amusing.

My child's school goes outside unless it's colder than -23C (um, something like -18F, I think). Being from Ohio, I about died when I heard that news. But she's perfectly content. I just have to remember to send her with her snowpants. And her parka. And her balaklava. And gloves. The school makes it clear, as a part of their handbook, that kids are to be dressed for the weather, because they WILL be going out. I do think they have a bin of extra gloves/hats for forgetful kiddos.

Sometimes, I wonder if the effort of getting 20+ kindergarteners dressed in all that stuff to send them outside for 15 minutes is really worth it!

It really is all about acclimatization. I surprise myself when I run to the garage in -10F in a pair of Crocs and pajama pants, but my kids are the same ones sweltering and ready to die when we visit family in Austin and Honolulu!

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#100 of 113 Old 12-29-2007, 11:38 PM
 
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this is a hilarious thread.

I grew up in Greenwich, CT, where the bus would pick up at 7 and drop us off at 7:30 or so but school didn't start until 8, and they would not let us inside until 7:50. So we had to stand around waiting for the bus (minimum of 10 minutes) plus 20 minutes of standing around in the snow outside school every freakin' morning in the winter. I remember being excited one day when it warmed up to 40 degrees.

Then we moved to Los Angeles, where in January during the rainy season, kids would come to school in ski parkas when the temp went below 60.

A few years later, my parents moved to Ireland, where the temperature never got below 45 but never got above 60. and the high humidity caused a bone chilling damp that meant you never got warm, even with two hot showers and layers of wool. No wonder people drink.

THEN a few years later, I lived in Senegal, West Africa. The temperature ONCE went down below 60 in the middle of the night, and everyone complained bitterly about the cold.

And I visited friends in Ithaca, NY, where temperatures never get above 30 in the winter, and you don't lock your cars in the winter for fear that the key will break due to the cold.

Oh, and once I visiting Mali, West Africa, while there were ice storms in NYC (temperatures below 20 degrees daily). My driver, when I remarked on the cold back home, said "oh, is it as cold there as here [in Bamako]? It is very cold here right now." It was 85 degrees in Bamako. He was serious. Other than in drinks, he had never seen ice.

I now live in DC, where the official snow policy seems to be "it doesn't snow here, we are in the south".

Oh, true story, years ago I was involved in cultural exchanges between Russian civil service employees and American counterparts, with the aim of "improving" the Russian civil services after years of Soviet rule, blah blah.

The folks from the St. Petersburg transport office (which of course includes the Snow Removal team) visited the DC snow removal office. The officials from Russia were flabbergasted at what they learned - "you have HOW many roads and HOW many snow plows? With such a horrible response rate? With HOW much average snow a year? - and WE are meant to learn from YOU??? A bunch of amateurs you are!!!"

Mind you, this was the year that the federal government had to call out the national guard to plow the streets of DC because the local government had failed to pay any of the private contractors for past snow removal, and for over a week, none of the secondary roads were plowed after a major snowstorm which shut down the east coast.

But hell, in DC, we get an inch of snow, and they cancel school...

Never mind me, I think weather-sizing is hilarious. ; )

You know the attributes for a great adult? Initiative, creativity, intellectual curiosity? They make for a helluva kid...
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#101 of 113 Old 12-29-2007, 11:45 PM
 
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,
A few years later, my parents moved to Ireland, where the temperature never got below 45 but never got above 60. and the high humidity caused a bone chilling damp that meant you never got warm, even with two hot showers and layers of wool. No wonder people drink.
I am laughing with genuine hysteria at your post. It rocks. My godmother is Irish (born there), my p g'parents are Scottish & French (from the north). I am totally roaring at the truth.

No wonder I slip on my boots and layers and get done what needs to get without the whiiiiiiiiiine.
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#102 of 113 Old 12-29-2007, 11:51 PM
 
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I am going to keep checking, because I now wonder if more people in the north die heat-related dates over those folks in Southern states. That's an interesting thought.
I know that a few years back, there was a massive heat wave that hit most of the country - Illinois to NY and down through the south were in the high 90s/low 100s, with high humidity, so the "misery factor" was around 110-120 (i.e. the temperature it feels like).

One thing I remember is that in Illinois, Ohio, and Indiana, PA, NY, there were scores of deaths related to the temperature - mainly old people whose A/Cs had died, people who got heatstroke working in the sun, little kids in hot cars, etc.

I remember that they did not report any deaths in MD, VA, and down south. I think this is because we are all used to those temperatures and know how to deal with them.

It all comes down to what people are used to. I saw this first hand around here two years ago when we had two big snow storms in a row, and then a smaller (but not inconsiderable) storm a few weeks later.

Normally, DC metro area people freak with snow, canceling school, closing the government, buying all the milk and toilet paper off the supermarket shelves, etc. But by the time of the third storm, nothing closed. There were fewer accidents, even. No one rushed out to by TP and milk. It was odd - suddenly we were used to snow.

It all reset the following year, of course... ; )

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#103 of 113 Old 12-29-2007, 11:58 PM
 
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I am laughing with genuine hysteria at your post. It rocks. My godmother is Irish (born there), my p g'parents are Scottish & French (from the north). I am totally roaring at the truth.

No wonder I slip on my boots and layers and get done what needs to get without the whiiiiiiiiiine.
heh, one of my best friends is half Irish, half French Canadian, who grew up in Boston. She has beautiful Irish skin, meaning she burns if she thinks about the sun for more than 5 minutes.

She lives in DC now, and the weather here drives her nuts. She is like a furnace - she has lived here for over 5 years and only pulled out her "cold weather" clothing for the week a year ago when it got down into the teens.

But she melts in the summer. She literally tries to arrange her life so she never has to go outside when the temperature is over 90, because she gets really sick. Honestly, she goes green, it is sort of fascinating with her red hair.

You know the attributes for a great adult? Initiative, creativity, intellectual curiosity? They make for a helluva kid...
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#104 of 113 Old 12-30-2007, 01:55 AM
 
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My kid's school policy is that if it is not a clear day over 35 degrees, they don't play outside. Which is odd seeing as we live in OR, it rains constantly.
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#105 of 113 Old 12-30-2007, 11:00 AM
 
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heh, one of my best friends is half Irish, half French Canadian, who grew up in Boston. She has beautiful Irish skin, meaning she burns if she thinks about the sun for more than 5 minutes.

She lives in DC now, and the weather here drives her nuts. She is like a furnace - she has lived here for over 5 years and only pulled out her "cold weather" clothing for the week a year ago when it got down into the teens.

But she melts in the summer. She literally tries to arrange her life so she never has to go outside when the temperature is over 90, because she gets really sick. Honestly, she goes green, it is sort of fascinating with her red hair.
You just reminded me of something that happened many years ago when I was in elementary in Michigan. We were having a heat wave either just before school ended or right after it started. The school didn't have air conditioning so they kept all the lights off and fans going in every room. They wouldn't let us outside for recess because it was "too hot" at about 90 and they even cancelled school a couple days because of the heat. On the other hand my dd's pre-k class went to the zoo over the summer when it was around 100 and as we live in FL there is never a day when it isn't humid. The kids all had a blast, but the teacher who has only lived here maybe 5 years after moving from the northeast was complaining the entire time about the heat. Surprisingly it gets really hot and rains during August in FL

Kristina mom to A 1/12 J 11/05 D 4/08 and tiny dude in late April 2010
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#106 of 113 Old 01-03-2008, 01:32 PM
 
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My son's K teacher said she often had children without proper/warm clothing (it's very cold here). They didn't head to the playground much once winter came.
I agree. In most schools the teacher can't take some of the class outside and leave the others indoors that do not have proper winter attire. That wouldn't be possible in most schools unless there is an assistant teacher on hand or a volunteer.

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#107 of 113 Old 01-03-2008, 08:34 PM
 
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There was a poll once on another board I frequent.

Schools all have policies. They ranged from "We stay inside if the temp or windchill is below zero F" (Alberta, Canada) to "We stay inside if the temp drops below 40 F" (South Texas).

Here in Upstate NY, the school policy is if windchill or air temp are less than 10 degrees, they stay in. I think its sensible - at those temps, bare skin begins to freeze in less time than they spend outside, and between kids with substandard winter gear and kids who forget or lose it or just take it off, you just don't know everyone is protected.

I know many families in warmer climates just don't bother with warm weather gear. In discussions about "what to buy for DD/DS for a winter coat" on that other board, I'm frequently bemused by what people consider "winter coats." They're buying things I'd think of as coverups for brisk fall weather and calling them "warm winter coats."

savithny, 42 year old moderate mom to DS Primo (age 12) and DD Secunda (age 9).

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#108 of 113 Old 01-04-2008, 12:56 PM
 
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I am a fanatic about making sure my kids have good winter gear, and I manage without huge expense by utilizing consignment/e-bay. I think my DD's school has a reassonable outdoor policy, and the kids are pretty hearty. BUT, I do make sure that directly after school is outdoor playtime for my kids, even before homework. I think it's really important to have outdoor time as many days of the week as possible.
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#109 of 113 Old 01-04-2008, 08:06 PM
 
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I am a fanatic about making sure my kids have good winter gear, and I manage without huge expense by utilizing consignment/e-bay. I think my DD's school has a reassonable outdoor policy, and the kids are pretty hearty. BUT, I do make sure that directly after school is outdoor playtime for my kids, even before homework. I think it's really important to have outdoor time as many days of the week as possible.
I agree beyond what you can imagine. Our biggest problem in the US is complacency. Many people in this thread are saying, " Kids in the south are poor, they can't afford coats", so therefore we need to be asking, "How can we make sure childrens' needs for activity and play can be met at the same they stay warm? Lets figure out a way to get sweatshirts and warm coats on these kids!"

If someone on this thread can give an addy, a point person, we can at least make sure the children mentioned in this thread can be clothed. It won't take much if we all help. George isn't going to do it, and waiting around for the next election is ignoring the needs of these kids *today*. I've already donated about 20 coats this season to local shelters. I can certainly help. We can say "What about all the other children? It's beyond one school?" And to that I answer : "We can 't trust our government to do a thing, so we must do it, and we'll need to, and we can't wait for fat-ass wanna be kings to care". These kids can't wait. Spare the rhetoric about how government doesn't care. We *so* already know that.
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#110 of 113 Old 01-05-2008, 01:50 PM
 
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I agree beyond what you can imagine. Our biggest problem in the US is complacency. Many people in this thread are saying, " Kids in the south are poor, they can't afford coats", so therefore we need to be asking, "How can we make sure childrens' needs for activity and play can be met at the same they stay warm? Lets figure out a way to get sweatshirts and warm coats on these kids!"

If someone on this thread can give an addy, a point person, we can at least make sure the children mentioned in this thread can be clothed. It won't take much if we all help. George isn't going to do it, and waiting around for the next election is ignoring the needs of these kids *today*. I've already donated about 20 coats this season to local shelters. I can certainly help. We can say "What about all the other children? It's beyond one school?" And to that I answer : "We can 't trust our government to do a thing, so we must do it, and we'll need to, and we can't wait for fat-ass wanna be kings to care". These kids can't wait. Spare the rhetoric about how government doesn't care. We *so* already know that.
You know, I agree with this, but I have an observation on this...

Growing up in a very cold climate in the 70s, it was my observation that even the poorest families made warm clothes a priority. There were class differences in what warm clothes were (wool coats and beanie hats vs. snowmobile suits), and the warm clothes were often handed down from older sibs, neighbors, or other families, but you saw very few kids being sent in clearly insufficiently warm clothes.

Now I live in a similarly cold climate. I ride a bus to work that starts in a very poor rural area, and again, I see the adults on the bus wearing better (from the warmth standpoint) winter gear than the upper class students on campus do. The coats are old, the boots too, the gloves often doubled up, but the priority is given there. In the schools, the same thing happens... there's an active "market" in neighborhood hand-me downs of snowpants, parkas, boots, and more. Our coats have come from neighbors, gone down to siblings, and then over to neighbors again. And every fall, there are bins all over town to drop off used coats and winter gear that you don't have someone to hand down to.

But that is cultural. That's the expectation that its going to get cold and the knowledge something has to be done about it. I think down south, with less of a culture of snow and ice, there's just not the awareness and the prioritizing of warm clothes. Culturally, maybe folks down there have responded to cold weather by staying inside, because they know it won't be that long before it warms up??

This isn't really an objection to your point, though. In fact, my experience confirms the need for communities to share resources and get involved...

savithny, 42 year old moderate mom to DS Primo (age 12) and DD Secunda (age 9).

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#111 of 113 Old 01-05-2008, 01:56 PM
 
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You know, I agree with this, but I have an observation on this...
.

But that is cultural. That's the expectation that its going to get cold and the knowledge something has to be done about it. I think down south, with less of a culture of snow and ice, there's just not the awareness and the prioritizing of warm clothes. Culturally, maybe folks down there have responded to cold weather by staying inside, because they know it won't be that long before it warms up??

This isn't really an objection to your point, though. In fact, my experience confirms the need for communities to share resources and get involved...

I lived in San Diego for several years and worked with extremely poor families there. I am amazed at how well prepared they were for whatever cold there was in SD. The mexican children were always in warm layers. We never had a problem with children not having warm clothing. Indeed, sometimes I worried the children were too warm. I often saw children in 50 degrees (morning temps, before the sun burned off the clouds) in ski jackets.

It may well be cultural, but it still doesn't make sense to me to not realize there will be some cooler to cold days...even in a warm place like San Diego. I dont know why these children were kept warm, but some children in the south are not?

I don't understand why people would not, as a commuity, figure out how to make sure children in individual schools got the activity they needed during a long school day.
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#112 of 113 Old 01-06-2008, 01:00 AM
 
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I know this was touched on earlier, and reminded me of this thread when I came across it today:

From Wikipedia (Old Wives Tails):
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Old_wiv...uses_pneumonia


Staying out in the cold without a coat causes pneumonia

False

Pneumonia is caused by bacteria such as Streptococcus pneumoniae. Variations on this tale include that someone who stays out in the cold will catch a cold or the flu (which are both known to be caused by viruses).[11]

This tale was not debunked until fairly recently. As public awareness of the cause of disease increased, the tale evolved to include a number of different pseudoscientific explanations. One popular explanation is that a low core body temperature negatively impacts the effectiveness of the human immune system. This intuitively makes sense, as we know fever, an elevated core body temperature, is one of the immune system's defenses against infection. However, studies have shown that there is no statistical correlation between lowered core body temperature and decreased immune response. [12] Still, this old wives' tale, in its modern, pseudoscientific version, is still prevalent
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#113 of 113 Old 01-06-2008, 11:14 AM
 
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Culturally, maybe folks down there have responded to cold weather by staying inside, because they know it won't be that long before it warms up??
I live in the OP's neck of the woods and I think you hit the nail on the head with the above. Kids (at least my kids) aren't back in school from winter break just yet, so I don't know if they would have gone out recently, but we've just had a pretty cold snap for these parts with lows in the teens and twenties and highs in the 30s. Today and for the next four days highs are supposed to be in the 60s and 70s, though! I imagine teacher just wants to wait until it's warmer to go out.

We have coat drives down here, too. I don't know anybody who doesn't have a winter coat (although I am sure there are a few folks), but I do know a lot of kids who don't always come prepared thinking that it's going to be chilly in the morning and then warm up in the afternoon when sometimes it stays chilly all day long. The weather is very up and down here and made moreso IMO by global warming. You might have an ice storm one week in December like we did 5 years ago that knocks out all the power (for a week!) and then you might have lovely 70 degree days in January that feel like spring! You just never know what you're going to get. I have also heard Yankees say that their blood has thinned since they've moved down here and the cold bothers them more now.

I think the teacher was being a bit slack myself if the kids wanted to go out, but I imagine that she was cold herself and projecting that onto the kids.

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