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#1 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 02:26 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My dd is 2 1/2 and I am starting to think about schooling options. Homeschooling seems to be the direction that we are heading, but I am trying to get input from both sides of the fence. Months ago I posted a thread in the hsing forum asking "why not public or private school". Very informative thread, I have read many wonderful things about hsing but I would really like to understand the cons of hsing or the pros of private/public schooling.. I am not trying to start a 'hsing vs. whatever (public, private, etc.)' thread, I am just trying to weigh out both sides.


ideas, thoughts?
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#2 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 05:33 AM
 
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I have been homeschooling my eldest dd for the last year and a half. She is 7 and I have a 4.5. yr old and a 18 month old. Almost certainly my dd will begin full time away school in January.

I am still pro-homeschooling and so is DH. Maybe we will return to HS, we are just taking it a year at a time.

Most homeschool could be called "Mom school". What I am referring to is not what you use for curriculum or if you unschool or which groups you join etc. I am referring to the fact that you are responsible for your child in all ways 24/7. Hopefully this is a good thing. In my case my dh works very long hours often 7 days a week. I also think I have been suffering from PPD. My daughter has still learnt to read and write at home and is not behind. Although, because of her ability she should be much further ahead academically. She has has wonderful experiences and made great friends. However I think my flat mood is affecting my children, my two dds are arguing a lot more and my eldest tells me she is bored and I don't have the mental energy to do more with her.

I am just one person. Many homeschoolers have dealt with these kind of issues and kept homeschooling successfully. For our family right now, I need some time off to get more exercise and relax and this fits best with my dd in a good local Catholic school. We will review our options later in the Spring for the fall. To homeschool you need stamina and hopefully plenty of help and support. Some personalities don't need that. I have realized I do.

You can always try homeschooling, kids can go to school later if that seems like a good option as circumstances change. Nothing has to be forever. Every blessing to you.
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#3 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 08:52 AM
 
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We've mostly homeschooled our first two children (my middle child, age 9, has always homeschooled), but my son decided to go to middle school this year and went to preschool, kindergarten, and a semester of 5th grade (to try it out before middle school). Sports is part of the reason he wanted to be in school--he has no option for playing football outside of school. My youngest, age 6, insisted on going to kindergarten and, this year, 1st grade.

I see many benefits to homeschooling, and you probably heard a lot of them if you posted to that thread. The pros of "institutional" schooling can include having an easy and affordable option for your child to work under different adults, if they are outstanding teachers and human beings. Of course, sometimes the teachers are neither of these, but sometimes they are. My son seems to benefit from some of his relationships with his teachers, though he certainly doesn't get much time each day with any of them. He probably benefits more from the one-on-one attention of his wonderful piano teacher, but we can't afford many tutors like that. (My 6 yo LOVES her teacher and has lots of fun in 1st grade, but we also had a very good homeschooling year when my son was 6 and at home.) He has gotten very good grades overall so far, but he doesn't like school enough to be sure that he will stay there. The jury is still out.

Re. other disadvantages to homeschooling: We have 3 kids all about 3 years apart, and I often found it hard to meet all their needs in a given day of homeschooling. At one point they were all non-readers (my 1st two were late readers), so finding time to read to them at their level and interest each day could be hard. We did use books on tape/CD, but sometimes I found it hard to keep track of all the things my kids needed and wanted to do. Some people have extended family in town who can help give them a break from their kids from time to time, but I rarely got a break, and that was emotionally and psychologically challenging at times. If any large task came up--doing taxes, finding a contractor to fix something, ridding the kids of a case of lice, moving--it could be very hard to find time to do the task, or the task would become very disruptive to our homeschooling rhythm/schedule. Also, if one of the kids or I got sick, that often meant that none of us could make it to homeschool gym, a fieldtrip, or piano lessons for a few days, and we would get cabin fever (or no one would get read to, etc.). These disruptions happened more often than we ever imagined. On the other hand, it didn't take long for my son to "catch up" in public school once he started, so I guess we weren't really "behind," as I often felt.

Depending on what the homeschooling community is like in your area, school can provide your child with a wider social circle. (In our area, most homeschoolers seem to be young-Earth creationists/ fundamentalist Christians, and we do not fit in with those groups very well.) The socializing in schools is not ideal, IMO--my son says that kids insult each other a lot, and of course you can't expect most kids to have the maturity and patience that adults can have--but sometimes homeschooling can get lonely, especially for the older child. In our area, there are lots of younger elementary kids homeschooling, but fewer middle school and teenage kids (and having friends at that age is so iimportant). Someone has started a teen group in our area recently, and those kids seem to enjoy each other so far--I'm not an insider, so I'm not sure--even though there is a mixture of extremely religious and not.

Interestingly, my son has not picked up lots of close friends in his 1/2 year of school so far. The social situation for HSing was hard for him--there were few kids his age to choose from, and few who lived close by--but the huge # of kids at school has not yet translated to really good close friends that he asks over. But he is shy. My 6yo is outgoing and has made lots of friends at school, but I think that kids that age are also more open-minded about friendship and less worried about being "cool." When my son has gone to school, he seems more concerned about fitting in, wearing the "right" clothes, and being cool than when we homeschooled.

If you can, try to find out about or attend some homeschooling groups in your area in the next few years. Or just talk to some people from those groups. That should help give you an idea of the level of support and whether or not you find a group you are comfortable with. Of course, a homeschool group can change a lot from year to year--ours had a group of teens a few years ago, and now most kids are 11 or younger.

You are doing a good thing by researching so early. Good luck with your decision!
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#4 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 09:30 AM
 
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Listing the pros and cons helps.

For me it's always been a no brainer,the local system is a drop-out factory with a 54% graduation rate.the charter schools are a 30-40 min drive one way and feed into said drop-out factory.

Sometimes I've honestly asked myself if this is a good idea,self doubt goes with the territory.The answer is always yes.I've seen who they become once they finish school.The local system isn't turning out any thing quite as good.
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#5 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 09:50 AM
 
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#6 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 11:38 AM
 
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For us hsing just was not an option. Where we live we have multiple choices in public school. For now dd is at our local neighborhood school, but even if we move out of this neighborhood she will stay at the same school. Thankfully a very easy process here as the school is also a magnet school. As a teen I saw my brothers be hs and refuse to do any work for my mom so they simply did not learn a thing. My dd has a very similar temperment and won't work with me on anything. I've recently written a glowing recommendation for her speech teacher as he is up for teacher of the year. He has helped her make huge improvements in her speech, but she won't even admit she is making sounds incorrectly for me. If I try to get her to go over the lists of words he sends home it becomes a huge frustrating mess for both of us.

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#7 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 11:43 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thanks for your replies! Very helpful


Quote:
Originally Posted by saintmom View Post
Listing the pros and cons helps.

For me it's always been a no brainer,the local system is a drop-out factory with a 54% graduation rate.the charter schools are a 30-40 min drive one way and feed into said drop-out factory.

Sometimes I've honestly asked myself if this is a good idea,self doubt goes with the territory.The answer is always yes.I've seen who they become once they finish school.The local system isn't turning out any thing quite as good.
I think this is what worries me. I haven't seen the results....I have nothing to compare it to. I would love to hear about hsers going on to college, etc.. it seems the only stories i hear in this area (Midwest) are stories of hsers who hate their parents , blah, blah blah- that sort of misinformation. I'm telling ya, I NEED to move to Oregon!!!
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#8 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 11:48 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by s_kristina View Post
For us hsing just was not an option. Where we live we have multiple choices in public school. For now dd is at our local neighborhood school, but even if we move out of this neighborhood she will stay at the same school. Thankfully a very easy process here as the school is also a magnet school. As a teen I saw my brothers be hs and refuse to do any work for my mom so they simply did not learn a thing. My dd has a very similar temperment and won't work with me on anything. I've recently written a glowing recommendation for her speech teacher as he is up for teacher of the year. He has helped her make huge improvements in her speech, but she won't even admit she is making sounds incorrectly for me. If I try to get her to go over the lists of words he sends home it becomes a huge frustrating mess for both of us.
This is something I worry about. Dont all kids go through a stage like this? rebellion? or like you said some just have this temperament. I think that would be really difficult. I really worry about this because I was that child! I would not have responded well to my mom.
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#9 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 12:25 PM
 
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I currently have 1 child HSed and 2 in school. Actualy, at the present moment, 1 child still asleep in bed and 2 in school. All 3 were in school up until a year ago (I pulled DD2 out in the middle of last school year; we started in January.)

DS is a loud and boisterous child. In other words, he's a normal, healthy, bright 6yo. But I'm not a "normal healthy" 35yo- I'm dealing with a chronic illness that saps my energy, and I'm super sensitive to noise and easily overstimulated. A day that's "good" for me would be "boring" for him. A day that's "fun" for him would be "overstimulating" for me.

I simply cannot keep up with him or provide him with the kind of stimulation he needs. I first put him in preschool at "almost 3" because he was watching way too much TV when I lacked the energy to even take him outside to play. I was hoping I'd be able to handle him better now that he's bigger, so I didn't put him in camp this summer. It was a disaster. He was bored and acted up because of boredom.

Academically, I'm not too happy with the pressure and the way things are being taught in the school environment, but his needs for social interaction, physical activity, etc are simply too much for me to handle and his overall needs are much better met by having him in school.

My 13yo is a very social creature and is horrified at the thought of only seeing her friends 2-3X a week, rather than daily. She also craves academic structure- I'm sure that COULD be provided at home, but for her the "schooly way of teaching" is a perfect fit for her learning style- severely limiting the benefits of HSing for this particular child. Maybe she'd look at things differently if she'd been HSed since kindergarten, both in terms of academics and socially, but that's not how things worked out. Even if she had been HSed since kindy, it's still possible that I would have put her in school by now.

My middle child was NOT doing well in school. She didn't do well in public school and she didn't do well in private school. She has a unique learning style and it's hard for her to learn in a classroom environment. She's a lot like me: easily overstimulated, needing a lot of downtime, and very self-directed. If she wants to learn something, she'll focus on it and get into it deeply. But if she doesnt' want to learn something (ie, it's taking her away from something else that she's focused on right now) she simply can't focus or absorb anything that's being taught.

So it's easy for me to facilitate her learning at home- as long as her siblings aren't around to distract her. We both have similar needs for quiet. She does beautifully with 2-3 activities per week- it's enough to keep her from being bored and to allow her to make friends, but it doesn't overwhelm her and it's within my physical limits to take her to these activities. Some weeks there's only 1 activity, other weeks we've had up to 4, but it's still far less draining than being in school 5 days a week.

We're taking things year by year. For next year, I plan to do the same as we did this year: DD2 home with me, and DD1 and DS in school. I may keep DD2 home all through high school; but for now I've only made a decision about 7th grade. I'm positive I'll keep DD1 in school through high school graduation. I'll probably do the same with DS, but I may consider HSing him in the future- my health could improve, and he may be less of a handful as he matures.

There's no reason you can't do the same: each year evaluate the options, look at your kids' current personalities and learning styles, what each local school can offer them, what you can provide outside of school (including HS activities and what the local HSers are like) and decide what's best for that particular child at that particular time.

Ruth, single mommy to Leah, 19, Hannah, 18, and Jack, 12
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#10 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 12:52 PM
 
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I feel that as long as the child is happy and learning(and safe!) it should not matter where they are taught. I really don't like forcing my kids to do any schooling option if there is not a good fit/match for them.
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#11 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 01:09 PM
 
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ds no 1 did one year of college,joined the navy,made chief at 28!
ds no2 did dual enrollment at cc,transfered to a 4 year,worked his way through graduated at 25 with a history degree.

dd no 1 finished hs at 16,cc at 18,translator certification in spanish at 19,wiil finish nursing school and have her r. n. this spring.

all our older ones have gone though the "I hate you,you're horrible"stage.It does seem like it manifests a little later with hs'rs.Fortunately when they get in their 20's they think we're genius's

College apps are more of a problem than college.Evidently everthing must be on a standard typed form,no more hand written transcripts

Academically IMO hs can provide a more student driven experience.Socially you have to work a little more to find stuff,more so if you live rurally.That's not a bad thing IMO,for most people high school was a fairly horrific experience socially.
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#12 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 01:13 PM
 
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I feel that as long as the child is happy and learning(and safe!) it should not matter where they are taught. I really don't like forcing my kids to do any schooling option if there is not a good fit/match for them.
I agree with above.

Over the years I have seen instances of bad homeschooling as well as instances of bad public/private schooling. I have also seen instances of all of the above being very good. In our case my DS prefers school. He loves his friends and teacher. He learns a lot. He is in a safe environment. He is very social and we are in no way able to provide the social contact he needs and wants. So its school for him. If things changed and safety was a concern then I would keep him home.
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#13 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 01:21 PM
 
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One of mine goes to an independant school, two of mine are hsing. (The oldest is in college). My youngest has never attended school at all, and my 15 yr old hasn't been to school since she was 9. My 14 yr old hs'd for two years and wanted to go back to his private school "I like the pacing of the day". So we go year by year child by child. All of the children are happy and thriving, so that is our gauge. I took the middle children out of school because we wanted to be hsers, and we wanted to save more money etc. We never had any issues with the school. They welcomed my ds back with open arms, and are very supportive of my hsing, too. I know we are vey lucky.
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#14 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 04:29 PM
 
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for most people high school was a fairly horrific experience socially.
I don't think that is true at all! "Horrific" is such a strong word. I, personally, loved high school and know a lot of others who did as well. Most people I know liked high school well enough. I don't think I know anyone who would describe it as horrific.

That said, I think the decision to home school or not can come down to personality. My ds (3rd grade) has been in public school since K. He likes the structure and needs it. He also very much needs the social interaction, which, in our area, would be hard to get without school.

I also shudder to think what would have happened if my own mom choose to homeschool me. She is very narrow in her views on a lot of things and is practically a hermit socially. It would not have been good for me at all and I'm not sure she would have recognized that. If I was growing up in this day when homeschooling is so popular, she most likely would have been all over it. She has always been very down on public schools because SHE had a bad experience, never mind that my siblings and I all thrived there, are all college educated and doing well with lots of fond memories of school. We grew up in the 70's and 80's when the homeschooling movement wasn't quite so prolific. To this day, she still talks about her negative opinions of schools even though she had four children successfully go through public school and her youngest is now 34 - lol.

Because of that, it is important for me that my children be exposed to different teachers with different interests and different views and be surrounded by their peers. As children get older, I think this exposure to different educators is more important, as is being with kids their own age.

I love it when my son comes home from school and has learned something that I didn't know. He taught our whole family about the moon phases last year. Neither dh nor I knew anything about them.

I agree with the pp who said that, just as some schools are bad, there are some people who do an awful job homeschooling. Homeschooling does not automatically equal a good education. Whether you choose to homeschool or send your children to school, the key is to be an involved parent. If you do send your children to school, you have to understand that education does not stop when your child walks out the doors of the school building. Reading, science experiments, trips to interesting places and many other things are all things that we do often in our house, some of it, like reading, we do daily. Education takes team work.
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#15 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 04:49 PM
 
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I am all for whatever works for each individual family. I don't believe either is "right or best" in general.

My daughter is 4.5 and she is in school She's at a Waldorf kindergarten and if everything continues to go well, she'll stay at the Waldorf school.

The reasons that I do not homeschool are the fact that it is really pretty uncommon here and would be very difficult for me to find a network of others doing the same. This would be a big issue for us as my daughter is a very social creature and she wouldn't do well with just us two all day, everyday. She is also an only child and needs time with people her own age on a regular basis.
She has been asking to go to school since she was 3 years old as she ADORES it! She's only in 4 mornings a week at the moment but has been wanting to go all 5 days.

As she gets older, I also don't know if am fully up to the task of homeschool and giving her the best education possible.

However, if something went wrong with our school, I don't feel like I would have a choice about it. I would have to homeschool because a mainstream school here is absolutely not an option for various reasons.
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#16 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 04:54 PM
 
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I enjoyed school, with the exception of a few years in Jr. High, when I'm not sure I would have enjoyed anything. DH enjoyed school, too. We were both brainy and not very popular, but liked school well enough. My parents both worked in PS - Dad as a HS science teacher and mom as elementary school Social Worker. I went to a middle tier PS - not the best, but not the worst. I'm a very strong supporter of our local public schools, which DD will start next year. DH and I are both working full-time and neither of us have any intention of giving up our employment to educate our children.

I had a really fabulous time in HS, by the way. The image consciousness of Jr. High was long gone. I thrived on the Year Book staff, Debate team and drama club. I took a lower level English/Humanities class rather than AP/Honors and it was a great class as well. I met people I hadn't really known very well. I had my first experience with single sex education in a non-AP calculus class and that was eye-opening as well. I felt I was well-prepared to attend college of out state and live on my own.

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#17 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 05:31 PM
 
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I went to a fantastic high school so I know that school can work. It was a good fit for me personally. I hated elementary school. So with both those biases on the table...

I would be open to homeschooling if I were for some reason not working, although that is not that likely. We're definitely open to both public and private school. I'll lump them together at first to talk about that. I am not taking down homeschooling; just talking about my thought process.

I think one of the big advantages to outside schooling, that we've discovered with Montessori already, is letting go of control of everything. I have that real control-freak side to me that wants EVERY experience to be THE BEST. But when I think about my own life, in fact, it's a lot of the imperfect experiences that were most valuable to me.

Also, I have fears... being homeschooled by my mum, who probably would have done it if it had been common then, would have been a nightmare of insular thinking. The vast majority of parents are not like this but what if I am! That kind of thing.

With Montessori I've seen already that some of the things they have given my son the opportunity to experience - riding a horse, lots of small things - are things that I wouldn't have thought of. And he soaks those experiences up. Then he comes home to our environment. So he gets sort of both perspectives.

Another aspect of school that I like is that he is with other kids all day. I know homeschoolers do this too! But I still like the ease of it. I like the way the kids at his school become a community - with the up and the down side of course.

I guess in both cases I consider that by letting him be educated by others I'm taking a risk - but that risk pays back in ways I wouldn't think of alone.

I do have to say though that I am a little biased about public education. We have pretty good public education overall where I live and there is a BIG part of me that wants to support that in every way, sending my son through, etc. It drives me crazy when people say "well just homeschool" because - okay, that's a reality for some people, but not for a lot of people.

But I'm not sure I can hack the specifics of some aspects of public school, particularly the way teachers are educated and not mentored and so on.

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#18 of 107 Old 12-26-2007, 06:25 PM
 
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We really considered homeschooling, but have pretty much put it off the table at this point for a couple of reasons:

1. Our family depends on two incomes, and neither DH or I am in a position to be out of the job market to become the full-time teacher for our kids. I know that it's generally considered an article of faith on MDC that any family could make it work on one income if they just tried hard enough/gave up materialism. In our case, it's not materialism, it's student loans. Becoming a one income family is just not an option for us.

2. It seems to me that homeschooling is not something that you can do in a vacuum. All of the homeschooling families that I know rely substantially on the local homeschooling community for socialization and support. I am not impressed with that community on a lot of levels -- and while I'm okay with sucking it up and dealing with the issues I've got on a social level, I'm not okay with the level of academics going on in our local homeschool group. A big proportion of homeschoolers here are either very evangelically religious in their outlook or are radical unschoolers, neither of which is an approach I'm okay with as far as education -- I'm actually kind of a conservative "classical education" kind of person, and there just doesn't seem to be much of that going on in our local homeschooling community.

Our approach at this point (keeping in mind that DS is only just two, and soon-to-be DS isn't even due for another 4 days) is to wait and see how each kid develops as a learner, and then look for the best school that will accomodate their learning style. We totally expect that we'll end up paying tuition until they're 25 to do that, but I can't think of anything I'd rather invest in than my kids education.

That said, we might revisit the issue of homeschooling at a later date... one of our big goals in life is to take a long-term sabbatical and travel with our children, in which case we'd homeschool while we were on the road. We also might look into it again as they get older and their learning needs change.

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#19 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 09:37 AM
 
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We have done both. We homeschooled each of our oldest two until they were in upper elementary school grades. They have been in a private school for two years now and love it. Our youngest DD has never been homeschooled and is in kindergarten.

I think it totally depends on you. I have experienced both options and like both. I would gladly go back to homeschooling one day if we feel we need or want to do that but right now am also very content with them going outside the home to school.

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#20 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 09:43 AM
 
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As a teen I saw my brothers be hs and refuse to do any work for my mom so they simply did not learn a thing.
Kids do this while in a school outside the home as well. I did it and my oldest child has done it some this year (7th grader). There is just no one clear cut thing that a homeschooled child is doing that is so much worse than a schooled-child. It seriuosly just depends on the child and how they cope in general in any situation.

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#21 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 11:46 AM
 
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Kids do this while in a school outside the home as well. I did it and my oldest child has done it some this year (7th grader). There is just no one clear cut thing that a homeschooled child is doing that is so much worse than a schooled-child. It seriuosly just depends on the child and how they cope in general in any situation.
If you read the rest of my post you can see that my own dd works well for other adults, but will not work for me. Would it be doing either of us any good to keep her at home? Same with my brothers once they went back to PS things changed drastically. Sometimes ideals of keeping kids away from whatever "bad" influence the parents see in PS is actually damaging to the kids. I'm all for being able to pick schools and situations that work for each family, but I don't think hs is best for every situation.

Kristina mom to A 1/12 J 11/05 D 4/08 and tiny dude in late April 2010
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#22 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 11:56 AM
 
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It's nice to have choices.

Historically when one institution/goverment or whatever has ceased to function optimally people have always done something different.Look at the rise of Protestantism and the decline of the the Roman Catholic Church for example.So this is what we're seeing in the rise of hs,Charters and online school.

It's not going to be about one or the other but about what works best for an individual situation.I heard once that for immigrants from soviet block countries that the choices in the western grocery stores made going shopping impossible.It was better when there was only one choice for orange juice,one choice for meet etc.

Vive la Differance!
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#23 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 01:08 PM
 
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Homeschooling would be my particular version of hell. I work full time outside the home. I love my job, and it is extremely important to me that I have the capability to earn a decent living. I cannot think of anything that would be less pleasant a prospect for either me or my kids than to homeschool.

We live in an excellent school district. The district is the primary reason we bought our house. My kids go to an awesome school, where they are thriving, and they both love school. They are both very social, as well as very academic. There is no way I could provide as good an education for them as they are getting. The school has an amazing music program, which has been great for my older daughter.

Is the school perfect? Nope. We have our share of disagreements, but we deal with them when they arise. But the experience so far has be overwhelmingly positive.

I'm another person who had a great experience in public high school.
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#24 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 06:11 PM
 
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I always intended to homeschool -- I didn't enjoy public school myself as I found it boring and, as I got older, lonely.

Ds1 is a very social kid with a vivid imagination. I sent him to preschool to age three to see what it was like and so that I could spend time with his then-infant brother. It went okay, but we kept him home the next year because the fees were so high and we didn't like it THAT much. And, although I really put myself out taking him to classes and hs playdates and such, by springtime he seemed .... lonely and bored.

Wtih some misgivings I enrolled him in ps kindergarten this year and that is going okay. I like his teacher and he is learning a lot but he's not crazy about it .... he seems .... lonely and bored.

So, I don't know. Having him in school suits me very well -- he is demanding and there are things about school he enjoys. I don't think hs-ing would suit him any better. That being said, I still don't know what we're going to do next year.
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#25 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 06:50 PM
 
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Homeschooling would be my particular version of hell. I work full time outside the home. I love my job, and it is extremely important to me that I have the capability to earn a decent living. I cannot think of anything that would be less pleasant a prospect for either me or my kids than to homeschool.

We live in an excellent school district. The district is the primary reason we bought our house. My kids go to an awesome school, where they are thriving, and they both love school. They are both very social, as well as very academic. There is no way I could provide as good an education for them as they are getting. The school has an amazing music program, which has been great for my older daughter.

Is the school perfect? Nope. We have our share of disagreements, but we deal with them when they arise. But the experience so far has be overwhelmingly positive.

I'm another person who had a great experience in public high school.
: Except that at the moment I am in between jobs however our family requires 2 incomes long term so homeschooling would not be for us, there is also the fact that my personality is not cut out for hs'ing. In theory it sounds good but I just could not do it.. also looking at my 2.5 year old's personality she thrives being in group settings.

I must say that overall I had no issues with public schooling, looking back now in my mid 30's, even the years that were less than pleasant taught me a lot.

Shay

Mothering since 1992...its one of the many hats I wear.
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#26 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 07:27 PM
 
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I live in an area with excellent and very safe public schools. Why should I not use them?

I'd probably re-evaluate this is we move.
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#27 of 107 Old 12-27-2007, 10:08 PM
 
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I live in an area with excellent and very safe public schools. Why should I not use them?

I'd probably re-evaluate this is we move.
Just wanted to note that homeschooling isn't always done in response to poor or unsafe schools. It has a multitude of benefits that have nothing to do with the quality of schools.

Blessed partner to a great guy, and mama to 4 amazing kids. Unfortunate target of an irrationally angry IRL stalker.

Holding on to anger is like grasping a hot coal with the intent of throwing it at someone else; you are the one who gets burned. ~ Buddha

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#28 of 107 Old 12-28-2007, 11:12 AM
 
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Some posts were removed due to UA violation and responses to this, that were taking the thread in a direction the OP did not intend.

 
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#29 of 107 Old 12-28-2007, 11:40 AM
 
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Homeschooling would be my particular version of hell.
feel the same way. I DON'T work and I STILL cannot imagine hanging out with my child all day. No thanks. I don't think she would like it either. She is three and attends preschool four hours per day. Next year she will attend all day.

If I had a child who clearly was not functioning well in the school system, I would probably hire a home tutor. There are just too many other ways that I enjoy spending my day.

Roman Goddess, mom to J (August 2004) and J (April 2009).    h20homebirth.gif signcirc1.gif
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#30 of 107 Old 12-28-2007, 11:52 AM
 
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You also have to think about your approach when cosidering hs.Unschool,eclectic,school at home (the latter is a sure recipe for burn-out IMHO).

We're pretty eclectic,but I've always had to approach "school days"pretty much as if I was still working,as far as organizing schedualing etc.Unlike my kids I don't get to veg out with a book on the couch too often.I still have to keep up with meals,laundry,bills and critters.It's worked for the last 18 yrs,but I sure enjoy vacation time when I get to do my own thing for a while
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