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Old 04-07-2002, 12:46 PM - Thread Starter
 
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What exactly are Sudbury Valley Schools?

I get this great mag called Journal For Living (JFL) and have read an article about Sudbury Valley Schools. They sound quite alluring for those of us who want our kids to follow their bliss. I have not yet visited one- the closest school is still quite far and am wondering if anyone has first hand experience, or has read extensively about the realities of SV school life.
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Old 04-07-2002, 10:08 PM
 
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Isis,

I too went through a curiosity stage of this educational or lack there of, path. And what I discovered was that it seemed an expensive place to basically 'unschool' ones kids..!


I looked on their website (forgot which, I did a search), and I read some essays written by teens who had gone through the school, and while they all claimed to have been 'freed' up, and empowered by the experience ( a good thing), they also were not writing to well...

I guess that I prefer to do it myself in that case..

It's a nice thing to add to an idea of a school which also holds other ideas as well IMO.
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Old 04-15-2002, 03:29 AM
 
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This is an excellent place to discuss "free" schools (if this has been done already, point me to the thread).

Sudbury Valley, USA is based on Summerhill, a school in England, founded by A.S. Neill in the earlier part of the twentieth century.

The book Summerhill:A Radical Approach to Child Rearing by Neill, which you can still find easily through used book websites and bookstores, inspired numerous "free schools" to start up all over the world.

Sudbury Valley is one of the very few "free schools" to have survived this long.

The basic approach is "live and let live". Classes are offered but no one is required to go. Children are free to do whatever they please, though in Summerhill at least, you were not free to do anything that impeded the freedom of others. Neill termed this "Freedom without liscence" meaning that you were free but only in ways that did not harm others. Also, Neill had no problem stopping a child from doing things that hurt themselves, including requiring adherance to community rules, regardless of personal objections.

Community rules and the school itself are run by self government, where every individual has one vote, no vote carrying more weight than another.

The difficulty here is application. It is hard to imagine Summerhill existing without Neill, who devoted his entire life to helping the school along. Most "free schools" since have fallen apart partly for financial reasons, but also because it is a rare individual who has the "vision" to both grant freedom to children and the common sense to know that there are limits and feel confident enforcing them.

I have visited one free school which has hung on for 2 decades in Florida. The experience was very disappointing. Children behaved like territorial wild creatures, wary of intruders, and very negative towards my then 2 year old I brought along. They teased him for wearing diapers!

Since none of the students were actually attending any class, it is fair to say they were not spending their time outside class doing anything that seemed, to the observer, either creative or challenging. They seemed to be sitting fairly still looking rather parched in the sun in different corners of the school yard. A deafening silence was everywhere. They seemed bored and negative and the school little more than a baby sitting service.

I do not know anyone who has personally attended Sudbury, though I think Mothering did several articles on the school. The campus at least is impressive from photos, and according to their own literature, the students are always happy and engaged in activity of their choosing.

My own personal feeling is that there is not enough good classes offered in these schools in general. Children can choose for themselves, yes, but if the curriculum is not interesting and well presented, the child really doesn't get much choice. I don't like "children raising children" approaches, and feel this often has a dumbing down, lord of the flies aspect to the results. I also do not feel, if the curriculum is weak, that there is much point in spending 4700$ a year to have someone else unschool my child.

Just my thoughts, I'll stop now

Heartmama

Mother is the word for God on the hearts and lips of all little children--William Makepeace Thackeray
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Old 04-16-2002, 04:06 AM
 
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Hi there

I am new to this but had to say that Sudbury is working well for us. Although the concept of *leadership* per se is not what the school is all about - the reality is that without strong people rowing the boat I think water would pour in quickly!

It can be a wonderful experience for kids - an organic process where they actually *do* help set the curricullum and learn more than 2+2=4 along the way. Social skills are so important and although the Lord of the Flies scenario might well happen - at ours the checks and balances keep things running smoothly.

We find it compliments our homeschooling and is miles ahead of the other discipline heavy alternative school we had our kids at for too many years. While SV it is not perfect - it is user friendly and is a work in progress. Aren't we all?

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Old 04-16-2002, 10:21 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi Gentledad,

You mention you are homeschooling too. How does that work? Are your children in part time at Sudbury?

How old are your kids, what was their former experience and what do they say about their current school?
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Old 04-16-2002, 01:31 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by sanna

I looked on their website (forgot which, I did a search), and I read some essays written by teens who had gone through the school, and while they all claimed to have been 'freed' up, and empowered by the experience ( a good thing), they also were not writing to well...
Er, "too well" surely?!



a

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Old 04-16-2002, 01:34 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by isis
What exactly are Sudbury Valley Schools?

I have not yet visited one- the closest school is still quite far and am wondering if anyone has first hand experience, or has read extensively about the realities of SV school life.
I am your man. But I am in Hospital trying not to die at the moment, so a comprehensive set of replies will be delayed, if it comes at all.

a

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Old 04-16-2002, 03:13 PM
 
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Isis wrote: You mention you are homeschooling too. How does that work? Are your children in part time at Sudbury?

How old are your kids, what was their former experience and what do they say about their current school?

gd: We let the kids go to their new school (Sudbury Valley based) for a few days a week for the first little while - the younger one is 9 and went mornings only. It was very part time for them both. They were both quite nervous about the school. It was opposite in many ways to their old school and this drastic change concerned us. Then, back home for lunch, music or whatever (except tv or computer games!). These days, they would both rather be at school than come home - they have met friends and enjoy the experience.

The best part of it is that they realize that their *teachers* are real people and feel no pressure to *teach* them anything. The teachers are very friendly and happy, well adjusted people. My kids feel this and it is wonderful for them to be with these adults. And learning happens...it comes from the kids and while I did not believe this could happen (I believed it was an adult fantasy) I now see how it really can happen. Older kids work with younger ones and there is accountability everywhere. I do not think this (non) system is for everyone but I am very impressed so far.

My kids attended a Waldorf school for many years. Although we thought it was wonderful for years it turned out to be a very painful experience for many of us. It took a long time for us to realize what was going on there. In many ways it was a cult-like experience. I still have difficulty dealing with why we stayed for as long as we did. What is done is done.

Many families have left Waldorf - some joined us at this new school. Now, my kids are almost over that experience (I hope) and are enjoying life and the new school. The older one thinks he might like to try a mainstream public high school in a couple of years - bigger sports program and theater - but for now we are delighted with the SV adventure. All of us - kids, teachers and parents are welcome to teach, learn and be part of this very organic educational experience.

Hope that answers your questions.

gentledad
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Old 04-16-2002, 03:57 PM
 
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a wrote: I am your man. But I am in Hospital trying not to die at the moment, so a comprehensive set of replies will be delayed, if it comes at all.

a



gentledad: I just read the above and I sincerely hope you pull through whatever it is you are going through. My thoughts and best wishes are with you and I look forward to hearing your reflections on your sv experience.

All the best to you,

gentledad
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Old 04-16-2002, 07:51 PM - Thread Starter
 
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alexander,

I also hope you pull through. I feel compelled to ask if there is anything we can do to help, but it seems like such a strange question over the internet...

My prayers are with you. Post when you can to let us know how you are doing.

isis
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Old 04-16-2002, 08:06 PM
 
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I've been trying to break myself of my mothering boards habit, but this thread just makes me want to throw caution to the winds and jump in...

first, good and healthy wishes to Alexander, whose ideas about the Sudbury model and education have always impressed me!

The model of democratic education developed at the Sudbury Valley School has successfully allowed children to learn, grow, develop, and become their own unique selves with confidence, freedom, respect, accountability, creativity, and fun for over three decades! I would heartily recommend visiting the websites of the various schools all around the country and world who have utilized and interpreted this approach to learning. You can find links through the SVS site, which is www.sudval.com. The books are great resources, as well.

A critical element of this model of education is that children (and the adult staff members) learn to work and live and learn cooperatively, to make decisions that effect the whole together, that the opinion of everyone matters, that you are accountable for your actions, that your own innate curiosity is a good thing! The core of this model (imo) is the balance between individual and community, something that my society (USA) doesn't tend to focus on (we tend to be rather me first and the heck with the rest of you, much of the time).

Staff members are elected every year - "teachers" are selected by the community because they are an asset to the community. Classes are offered because students have requested them. Kids learn how to read when they need to, they can spend an entire day designing a fort or creating an elaborate role playing game with their friends, they can work on their skills in French, sew clothes, read novels, bake bread, take pictures, throw pots, put on plays, learn algebra...

I went to college with people who had been to Sudbury Valley, I've been fortunate to visit two SVS model schools in other parts of the country, and these schools are hopping with activity, kids are busy, busy, busy all over the place, they are talked to by adults with honesty and respect and respond in kind, they have a clear set of established rules for the good of the whole community that the community itself has established, they learn to work constructively to solve disagreements, they want to go to school each day!

It's probably more than a little obvious that this model of education is one that I strongly believe in (I have my own critiques, of course). With respect to the opinion of others, it think it is far more than paying for unschooling... I think the most impressive experience you can have is to visit a school, talk to the kids there, see how it works in action. In my experience, you will get a glimpse of a harmonious community of active, determined learners, supportive of each other, respectful and respected, learning how to solve problems and resolve differences, learning what it means to be responsible for one's actions and decisions, and finally, enjoying a period of their lives to the fullest!

peace,
jen
edited to add - sanna, ironically enough, one dream of SO and I is to open a sudbury-influenced school in Ashland! Beautiful home you have...cheers, j
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Old 04-16-2002, 11:56 PM
 
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Sending healthy vibes to you Alexander, and hoping that things are not as bad as it sounded in your post.

((((Alexander))))

Heartmama

Mother is the word for God on the hearts and lips of all little children--William Makepeace Thackeray
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Old 04-17-2002, 03:45 AM
 
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Hope you feel better soon, Alexander!
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Old 04-18-2002, 04:26 AM
 
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Elnachick,

Not a "com".

www.sudval.org/

a

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Old 04-18-2002, 10:09 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I just found out a friend of mine had her daughters in the Sud school "near" me for awhile and really liked their experience. Her girls had been there, however, when their tuition was only a grand per year, and I believe the price has gone up!

At this point, the only way I can afford a private school of any type is if I am on the faculty.

Does anyone know what kind of ed/qualififications is required for Sudbury faculty. What is their job description like?

Another question I have is: they sell kits to start Sud schools. Has anyone started on or know what might be in those kits? I am tempted to buy one for kicks.

If anyone has answers, I would be grateful.
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Old 04-18-2002, 11:57 AM
 
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The only qualifications that you need are that the children want you in their community.

All staff are elected every year on a 1 year contract. Children are encouraged to seek people in the local community that satisfy skill requirements in the areas of study that concern them at that time. When interest wanes in that area, there is little likeyhood that children will re-elect that staff member. This is as the school is designed.

Generally, potential staff members that want to put themselves up for election must spend considerable time (1 month full time for example) at the school. They may be quizzed closely by the children, and as equalls. Forget any "teacher / student" relationship here if you want to survive. You are staff, with no more "authority" than any other member of the community.

New staff members generally are granted only part-time work too, particularly if they have not much experience of this model before.

I can not recomend strongly enough that you read "free at Last" by Dr. Dainiel Greenburg. You may even find it is a requirement of the school, (depending on which branch), and a number of other publications too:

"And Now for Something Completely Different..."

The Crisis In American Education

A Clearer View

and for analysis of former students:

Legacy of Trust by D. Greenberg and M. Sadofsky.

This last book is "statistical" in nature, as it looks at a great many former students. The great thing is that the raw data is in the book, so you can do your own analysis too, rather than be "spoon fed" the out-come by the authors. They go to extraordinary lengths to ensure that everything is open to public scrutiny, so that you can draw your own conclusions.

You can always fire you Qs here too...

a

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Old 04-21-2002, 08:20 AM
 
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Our family had been devoted to Waldorf Education for several years until we moved to the UK and experienced a much more rigid approach to this education that left us (and particularly our children) very unhappy. Thanks to the Mothering Discussion forums we learned about Democratic education and started researching.
The websites all looked great and offered a refreshing and inspired (!) approach to children and how they learn. It was something that just made sense for us, although admittedly it is a big leap of faith and many people we have talked to, simply can't grasp the "concept" of children being naturally voracious, independant learners (I feel this is due to the example given by the fact that many children in regular school environments are often restricted/pressured/limited in their learning material. Barriers go up and then coersion is required to get them to co-operate/progress). It also struck us as being like unschooling in a school setting, but then social interaction was always a problem for us when we homeschooled and these schools provide that all important community and peer interaction in a free and creative environment
With five children, private schools take a lot out of us (financially and involvement-wise) and so we were excited to find The Blue Mountain School (www.bluemountain-school.org) in Oregon, a publicly-funded Democratic School (I believe the only one in the USA). We flew from England to Oregon to visit and were impressed with what we saw. Happy, busy, confident children, lots of facilities, beautiful rural location and friendly staff. We also visited other schools on that trip (charter Waldorf and private Democratic).
We are planning to move our family of seven, 8,000 miles to attend this school this year.
For anyone with reservations, I would suggest also reading as much as you can via the websites, free texts and books offered through the Sudbury Valley site and try and visit a couple of schools. We were glad we did, the kids are soooo excited
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Old 04-21-2002, 08:53 PM
 
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a little more about your Waldorf experience? Although if your not comfortable discussing it I understand.
Peace,
Cathy
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Old 04-22-2002, 04:42 AM
 
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Hi Cathy,

I found this board because I am looking for positives - my kids are now in a Sudbury Valley type school and I want to work to understand this concept. I am getting involved in many ways in this school and look forward to moving forward with the work.

But - since you asked (someone else asked earlier, too) I respect your question and will try to answer as best I can without seeming overly negative, if it is possible. It is difficult to deal with even though we have been out of Waldorf for over a year.

I have never been considered *flakey* or prone to join a cult. I have plenty of time for things spiritual, however (try to be respectul) and even more time to try to help my fellow human - socially and with regards to the environment.

After many years of being involved with a Waldorf school and the movement internationally - I have come to the conclusion that our family was grossly mislead in the beginning. This is simply not a non-sectarian education based on any particual *philosophy.* As I attended meetings and workshops over the years and somehow managed to avoid seeing much of the occultism that is inexorably linked to Waldorf - and not just our school - I began to accept that the potential of Waldorf was enough to keep us there.

My non-Waldorf friends began to question my connection to the school. "Another meeting?!" is a term I heard all to often. How much money did we give to the *cause?* How many hours per week? I honestly thought it was for some sort of social renewal - unfortunately I never really did the research. I guess I did not want to because I might realize what *social renewal* means in the Waldorf world. I wanted ( and still do) to help build a better world for me, my children and the kid in the sweat shop in Indonesia. Steiner's threefold social order (renewal) has very little to do with what I (and countless others) thought we were getting into.

I must say that I met some delightful people along the way - most have left the *movement* and some are still there. Not all who work for Waldorf are evil cult members by any means! But - I saw a very real cult like mentality within the movement. There is no doubt in my mind about this. Remember - the word "cult" does not mean "evil." Nevertheless, Waldorf PR is less than forthright to put it mildly. I would be very interested to see some statistics on enrolment and retention. Our school was a revolving door for teachers and students. I saw many families leave very upset and feeling as though they had been swindled. When things became unbearble some of the diehards (us, included) tried to find accountability and were ignored. Children were forgotten, families were hurt and children are supposed to be what schools are all about. I am sorry if this sounds harsh but it is very real and painful for more than just my family.

Waldorf schools are religious schools. If you like and agree with the religion (anthroposophy) I think you would be well served there. If not - it can be very difficult to understand all the soul work and even more disturbing to understand the lack of accountability and denial that permeate this *movement.*

While I doubt all W schools are exactly the same -and I have friends who attend these schools in different areas - the evidence points to the fact that unless one is prepared to embark upon (or have your children do so) a deeply esoteric occult journey - Waldorf is better left to the anthroposophists. Again, I am not dumping on anyone's religious conviction here - that is the way it is. I was asked a question.

Now... about Sudbury Valley.... (sigh)
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Old 04-22-2002, 05:01 AM
 
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Oops! I thought you were asking me! My mistake, hope you don't mind (the board won't let me delete the post). I didn't mean to turn this into a Waldorf problems thread : !

No problem............
We attended a Waldorf school in the States for about 3 years and pretty happy with the approach to children and their learning and the children seemed to really enjoy the respect and warm relationships they had with their teachers, we didn't have concerns for the most part.
Then the decision was made to return to the UK (where I'm from) and it was heart-wrenching for us to pull them out but we hoped that we would find a suitable alternative in the UK.
We had no idea of the difference in the approach to the education between the countries. We experienced very rigid teaching, shouting at the children, poor relationships between teachers and students, a complete absence in our particular cases of any bonding between the teacher and child (as you many know, Waldorf teachers are required to meditate each evening on every child in their class and greet them each morning, etc.) and our children were coming home miserable. Now, these are happy, imaginative children with good attitudes! The day came when our eldest (and most agreeable child!) refused to go to school, frightned and almost hysterical. I told her class teacher and she agreed that we should meet to discuss the situation very soon. We recieved no phone call or letter for 2 weeks. We then attended a meeting with the two main "problem" teacher that my daughter had mentioned. The both feigned ignorance to any problems and because their was "nothing wrong" they couldn't see what they could do to make things better.
We were pretty upset and angry and heard some awful things from other children and parents about things that were said/done in the classrooms. So a couple of months later we submitted a letter (grenade?) to the school which stated our feelings and many other parents discontentment. And to try and cut a long story short, we never recieved any communication from the teachers in question and they proved to be inflexible. The College of Teachers rallied around and defended each other despite all the long term problems other parents had told us of.
To cap it all up, the differences we experienced seem to be that European Waldorf schools in general have a much more almost Victorian attitude to teaching, albeit with a Steiner curriculum and Anthroposophy (from a purely Christian view) is in the forefront of the schools here. The US school seemed much more progressive with more respect and consideration for the children in a very nurturing environment, besides being non-denominational.
Our problems encountered and suggestions presented to the UK school are being used as a "working document" we are told to try and improve things at the school. But the College has informed us that due to the "breakdown of trust" between ourselves and the teachers that they do not feel that they can productively teach our children
We were committed, devoted parents, very involved at the school (newsletter, secretary, website, transport, fundraising, etc.) with great kids - so we are happy that the problem was not ours, and frankly relieved to be moving on (despite the enormous inconvinience).
We are all pretty disillusioned with Waldorf education now and it's apparent "moulding" of our children to this perfect Anthroposophical model and it just doesn't sit well with us anymore. The kids are super happy to be out of the school despite not seeing their friends so much (apparently a worthwhile trade-off) and excited to be heading off to a more liberating school.
I hope I've condensed the story enough, it has many details but would be pages long! Feel free to ask if you need any elaborations.
I am also interested in hearing from other parents with Waldorf experience choosing Sudbury Model Schools.
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Old 04-22-2002, 12:42 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I second that we don't let this become a Waldorf problems thread.

I have to admit that I winced when I read b'smom's Q on this thread, and I worried that this would turn into another heated debate. But I took a deep breath and trusted that those on this thread are thoughtful people who don't have a political agenda. Eveyone walks a different path, and I value others' stories. We aren't who we are without them.

I helped to found a Waldorf school years ago. We were a group of parents who wanted a better education for our children, we liked the Waldorf model and so we formed a school. Many of those first parents are still on the board or have become teachers, and only a few consider themselves Anthroposophists. Many of them are friends of mine, despite the fact that we chose to leave the school three years ago. It was an unpleasant situation for me when we left- because there seemed to be some reason a few members of the board wanted me out of the school (I was faculty.) There was enough support for me that I could have battled it out. Instead of fighting for my job, I chose the positive road of homeschooling. I didn't feel like working someplace that required me to fight! I was hurt very deeply and was quite angry, but choose, for my son's sake, to stay involved with the community, continue to volunteer, and enroll him in the homeschooling enrichment program. It may sound like a strange set of actions to take in the face of practically being ousted, but I am very glad I stayed involved. The "enrichment" they have offered has been top quality, and have always felt my son was valued and welcomed. (Had that not been the case we would have been out of there so quick!) I have worked through my feelings along the way and have been able to see the school and it's workings in a clear and objective way and understand the individuals in it's system as regular people with differing ideas and motivations.

Meanwhile, my son approaches his last year in "enrichment", and I am reducing my volunteer load so I can be freer to consider new ideas that would benefit my family. My near-5yold daughter is very capable and awake and self-determined. She would probably love Sudbury!
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Old 04-22-2002, 06:30 PM
 
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tankgirl, Blue Mountain School is one of the democratic/"Sudbury" schools I have visited - what a great place, I'm excited for your family! It impressed me with a real sense of contentment, creativity, lots of excited and busy kids running around, really neat adults, beautiful location, unique and really interesting innovative approach to problem solving and "discipline"/judicial type issues, etc. Way to go! You are a brave, wonderful family to take such a great leap, and bravo to you for making such a step for your kids! That part of Oregon is beautiful, as well! Hurrah!

edited to attempt to rectify my rather bad spelling...
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Old 04-22-2002, 07:07 PM
 
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Elnachick, such kind words and support ! I am very touched ! We can't wait to get there (esp. the kids).........
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Old 04-22-2002, 07:55 PM
 
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Gentledad, thank you for your answer. I appreciate your thought and time that went into it. Now... I'm all for getting this thread back on track with more about Sudbury.
Blessings,
Cathy
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Old 04-23-2002, 02:29 AM
 
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Forgive my SV ignorance but I find the entire concept of noncoercive education a little difficult to fathom. I *think* I get it and agree with it ... but...
I still must remind my kids to brush their teeth. Am I coercing them into this? They really are starting to enjoy the SV model school but are not as into the set classes as much as *I* would like them to be. Maybe that is *MY* problem. Part of me wants to remind them about the academic side of life and another part says to leave them alone.

Their academics are fine and I know they are thriving socially but there is still that nagging doubt.... Some parents and a few teachers are thinking of putting together a mini university type schedule for kids 12 and older next year. Not a heavy, homework thing but a more subtle reminder of what they can expect should they choose to go on to university. Anyone have any experience with anything like this?

Funny, my oldest - 12 - actually enjoys getting a teacher to give him *homework* so he can moan about it with other non SV school kids during sports programs! He certainly will not "get in trouble" for not doing it and has really taken it on - giving himself expectations. Book reports, etc. Makes me laugh and laughter is a good thing for kids - and us grown-ups, too.
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Old 04-23-2002, 07:57 AM
 
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I'm back!



Very sorry to hear of problems in other systems, but let's try to keep this thread for Democratic School discussions.

Non-Coersive Education.

Gentledad mentioned that it is a little difficult to fathom. The point really is that by leaving the child to interact in a community of interesting people, that child will encounter the things that stimulate him. A child so stimulated by something that interests him will, without prodding or coaching, tackle all the obsticles that prevent that child from accumplishing his goals. Thus, if reading a text is something that the child needs to do in order to move forwards, then he will find a way to get it read. Usually, with young children that means fing someone who can read it for them, but as children grow older, they value thier independance, and learn to read for themselves.

This is a major reason that it is so important to have good role-models as staff, and to be a good role model as a arent.

Gentledad mentions the problem of tooth brushing. To be sure, there is an optimum age that a child can be taught by example (say up to 5) after which it becomes much more difficult. Brushing your teeth in frot of your (young) children, getting them to help choose the toothpaste and the odd toothpasthe fight in the bathroom connects children to the business of brushing teeth more effectively than any type of coersion, and it is long-lasting.

Hope this helps.

a

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Old 04-23-2002, 08:14 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally posted by gentledad


Their academics are fine and I know they are thriving socially but there is still that nagging doubt.... Some parents and a few teachers are thinking of putting together a mini university type schedule for kids 12 and older next year. Not a heavy, homework thing but a more subtle reminder of what they can expect should they choose to go on to university. Anyone have any experience with anything like this?

Yes. This is not a good idea. The experience of SVS is that children who are "encouraged", "guided" or plain coersed into following any type of "curriculum" generally become a behavioral problem in the school, not taking it seriously.

In addition to this, it subtly shows that parents do not have faith in their children to do what it takes to get where they want to go. Even if you can convince yourself that you have no such lack of faith in your child, that may not matter. What will your child feel? (and they are not always able to recognise it and express it in words) and how do you think it will manifest itself?

Generally, I have noticed that children that fall into this category, over the long term, end up producing the bare minimum, lackluster work, but hang in there, finding it difficult to "give up" because they know, deep down, someone else will be disappointed.

The Sudbury model provides that the children learn to decide for themselves what they want, and learn to go and get it! By creating a "course", you remove an important lesson that children learn in the SVS system. That they are entirely responsible for themselves, and that they can get what they want, only after they realize that they do in fact want something.

There is another point too, which is that for suvival and prosperity in the Information Era, the best training is the utter freedom to play-out the day in a manner that becomes apparent to the individual. But that is a subject for another post, as I have to nip down to the hospital again. :

Hope this helps

a

Edited to add, SVS once had "courses on offer", but abandoned it.

a

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Old 04-23-2002, 03:51 PM
 
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Alexander,

My computer went down, still is, and I finally read your post to me regarding spelling. I just want you to know that I am from Europe, and considering that English is not my first language, I write pretty good.. I mean well, no??
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Old 04-23-2002, 07:36 PM
 
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Alexander:

The Sudbury model provides that the children learn to decide for themselves what they want, and learn to go and get it! By creating a "course", you remove an important lesson that children learn in the SVS system. That they are entirely responsible for themselves, and that they can get what they want, only after they realize that they do in fact want something.

GD: Hmm.. OK - I was thinking more in terms of *offering* a course - based upon what a given group of kids said they were interested in. For them to go and get what they want they will need somewhere to get it from - or someone help them with it.

I would be very interested in your experience, Alexander.
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Old 04-23-2002, 10:57 PM
 
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Gentledad, This interests met too. alexander, how far do you go to show the child what is out there that he or she could be learning?

I can see that offering any sort of 'course' will negate the whole experience, you have to have 100% confidence in the system if it is going to work, otherwise you will be offering the worst of two worlds, instead of the best of one.
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