Official Hospital ban on kids... - Page 2 - Mothering Forums

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#31 of 39 Old 10-27-2009, 07:48 PM
 
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Yeah, CPS doesn't work that way here either. I've had CPS involvement for years due to my son (who is bipolar/adhd) and was told by my case manager and by the social worker that if you hand your child over, they view it as saying you cannot take care for your child. Therefore, to get said child back, you have to jump through all the CPS hoops and do everything they want until they will hand the child back. I even asked about respite care-my ds has had periods of time when he was a danger to his siblings and I don't know if their dad will always be around to take them so I can focus on him-and again, I was told if I asked for even a 24 hour placement to protect my other children, I was admitting I couldn't properly care for him and I wouldn't be getting him back anytime soon.

Anyway, I think this is completely ridiculous. Besides the kids thing, which would hurt me so much (I spent 5 days in the hospital after my last child, being away from them AND the baby for 5 days...oy, I would've been a wreck), the other policy is basically preventing people from having personal help at the birth. Or family. Its like we're going backwards.

What I think seems to be missing is simply this: yes, the baby may be in the hospital for 1-2 days, maybe longer, but as soon as they go home, they will be exposed to all sorts of things anyway. You can't build a bubble around a baby, it doesn't work. I can understand trying to prevent spread in the hospital...but that's why hospitals scare me anyway. People catch all sorts of things from there-H1N1 is hardly the worst. And arn't most hospitals mandating vaccine for workers anyway? I mean, are they saying they don't trust to vax to prevent spread (amongst hospital workers) now?

Honestly I think this a foolish move on their part. How many women will be going home too soon now because they miss their family? How many more will have cesareans and other interventions because they don't have the extra support during birth? How many will be pushed more towards PPD because they can't see their children while they recover? Worry and sadness can have a profound impact on birth and recovery.

Sadly I have to say that if my hospital enacts this and I end up in the same situation as last time, I will not be staying. I had HELLP, I had a cesarean, and I had a preemie. There is no way I could be there for even a couple of days away from everyone.

And on a side note-my fiance wouldn't be able to visit either, since finding a babysitter is so difficult and affording one, for us, even harder.

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#32 of 39 Old 10-27-2009, 08:52 PM
 
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CPS here does parent respite. We had a child for years, every other weekend came to us to give the bioparents a break (heck, we needed the two weeks in between to recover!). They signed the kid in to care every other Friday, for two days, got her back on the Sunday no issue. It kept them from having to put her into foster care full time.

We did have another TCA (temporary care agreement) where the mom did have to jump through some hoops, but it was a totally difference scenario. Signing a TCA because you are giving birth in a hospital with no family to babysit? You'd be able to swing by and pick up your TCA'd kid on the way home.
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#33 of 39 Old 10-27-2009, 10:15 PM
 
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IMHO, if hospitals limiting visitors and support personnel on maternity wards in an effort to slow the spread of disease makes more mamas think about how germ-y hospitals can be and encourages some mamas on the fence to consider an out of hospital birth, that's not necessarily a bad thing.
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#34 of 39 Old 10-27-2009, 10:27 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Noelle C. View Post
But...what about ADULTS? Adults between 20 and 45 are statistically most likely to die, and the majority of cases so far have been in adults in this age group. Simply banning kids is putting a finger in the hole in the dam's wall when it's spilling over the top. You stop it from getting in one minor way while overlooking that there's another way.

Also hospitals are really not known for being the cleanest of places as it is. Why not ban shoes, for instance? You can't make an entire hospital sterile. You just can't. And stressing out people who NEED support by denying them their support is NOT going to help. Believe me on personal experience. The hospitals I've been in have learned they MUST bend the rules or else my vitals go nuts and they're are risk.

They need to stop with these stupid blanket policies.
Yes, I'm aware that adults can spread the virus as well. I'm sure hospitals know that too, and they also know that they can't create a completely sterile environment or stop every germ from being spread. They're doing what they can. And as a I stated earlier, I'm sure a lot of what they're doing stems from a desire to prevent lawsuits.

I think some hospitals are going over the top with saying that doulas aren't permitted or that once you enter you can't leave, but I don't necessarily have a problem limiting children. I have a three year old, and while we stress proper hygiene with her, I know that she's not as strict about cleanliness as my husband and I are. She picks her nose. She puts her hands in her mouth. She picks things up off the floor or the ground if they look interesting to her. She fiddles with her shoes. She's a little kid. They're germ-y.
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#35 of 39 Old 10-27-2009, 10:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by mcgee View Post
IMHO, if hospitals limiting visitors and support personnel on maternity wards in an effort to slow the spread of disease makes more mamas think about how germ-y hospitals can be and encourages some mamas on the fence to consider an out of hospital birth, that's not necessarily a bad thing.
haha, nevermind, i read the post wrong....

None of the ideas expressed above are actually mine. They are told to me by Luthor and Ferdinand, the five inch tall space aliens who live under my desk. In return for these ideas, I have given them permission to eat any dust bunnies they may find under there.shine.gif

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#36 of 39 Old 10-27-2009, 10:45 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Originally Posted by mcgee View Post
IMHO, if hospitals limiting visitors and support personnel on maternity wards in an effort to slow the spread of disease makes more mamas think about how germ-y hospitals can be and encourages some mamas on the fence to consider an out of hospital birth, that's not necessarily a bad thing.
Not everyone can do that. I have a complicated medical history not even counting the fact that I'm a VBA2C.

Deb, Mom to Madeleine 8/2005 and Maia 11/2009 Nick: and Chris
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#37 of 39 Old 10-29-2009, 03:20 AM
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Originally Posted by DocsNemesis View Post
Honestly I think this a foolish move on their part. How many women will be going home too soon now because they miss their family? How many more will have cesareans and other interventions because they don't have the extra support during birth? How many will be pushed more towards PPD because they can't see their children while they recover? Worry and sadness can have a profound impact on birth and recovery.
Many families can't afford to hire babysitters to stay with the children while the father visits with the mother, so I have no doubt this will result in many families having NO CHOICE but for the mother to sign out AMA. This many mean having to leave a newborn.

This whole thing is a load of bunk. Don't touch anything in the hallways but the floor. Go to your room. Have only who you want there. Someone else bringing a kid doesn't impacts everyone else's rooms. Someone having a child in the room next to me (I'm not planning a hospital birth, but if my baby doesn't move head-down SOON, it will happen in a hospital by freaking state law) does NOT impact me in my room. A nurse's shoes touch the same floor, yes, but those same shoes touch the nasty ground outside, and nurses must wash hands before touching patients or anything else in the room. So who cares if someone has a kid picking her nose in another room? If one woman doesn't want children around her immediately post-partum, don't have them in her room. Simple as that. Don't deny another woman the right to have her children there.

I have a friend who shouldn't deliver out of hospital. I'm very pro-out-of-hospital births, but she shouldn't. She and her husband have NO ONE who can watch their kids, and it's necessary for him to be present. Since no one can watch their children, she may have to deliver out of the hospital. The safest thing for her would be to deliver in a hospital with her husband there, and she might not be able to. Between hospital and no husband, or husband and no hospital, the safer is husband and no hospital. The safest option isn't an option for her.

You know, I have no doubt at all that the hospitals are probably being at least partly motivated by money. Pass crap rules like this and more women will ultimately end up with interventions. Who can advocate for a woman in labor when things go wrong if her husband can't be there because no one is available for child care? THE HOSPITAL has the say at that point, and what do you think they will choose? C-section.

Terribly, this rule doesn't apply just to the maternity ward either. It's entire hospitals. If I had to be hospitalized and they said I couldn't have my baby in at all, I'd sign out AMA unless it was life-or-death. How do they think this will impact breast-feeding mothers to be forced apart from their children? I doubt they care.
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#38 of 39 Old 10-31-2009, 01:21 PM
 
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So if a support person leaves and is not allowed back in, does that apply to nurses? If they leave at the end of their shift, are they banned from the hospital/ward until flu season is over? Of course not.

On a more realistic note, are the staff (doctors and nurses) confined to the baby ward during their shifts? Or are they allowed to the cafeteria/outside/other parts of the hospital for breaks, etc? If so, what's the difference between that and a partner/doula going home for a few hours and then coming back?
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#39 of 39 Old 10-31-2009, 05:38 PM
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So if a support person leaves and is not allowed back in, does that apply to nurses? If they leave at the end of their shift, are they banned from the hospital/ward until flu season is over? Of course not.

On a more realistic note, are the staff (doctors and nurses) confined to the baby ward during their shifts? Or are they allowed to the cafeteria/outside/other parts of the hospital for breaks, etc? If so, what's the difference between that and a partner/doula going home for a few hours and then coming back?
You hit the nail on the head. These rules don't actually eliminate the risk they claim. Patients' families are more likely to stay confined to the room of their family member. The STAFF are the ones going from room to room and are more likely to transfer germs. Hand-washing doesn't eliminate what gets on their scrubs, and scrubs can be VERY germy, which is why they wear sterile coverings in the ER. Their clothing does come into contact with various surfaces in the rooms, and then into yours. I'd rather have a nose-picking child depositing some germs from a fairly-healthy outside world than a nurse depositing germs from several other sick-rooms.
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