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#61 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 09:29 AM
 
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At 6 years old my son would not have been ready to do that (he's 7 1/2 now and still isn't).

 

Would you consider letting her do it if someone you knew (a family friend or relative) was on the train with her (even if she didn't know they were there) to keep an eye on things? She could feel independent and you could still know she was safe.


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#62 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 11:21 AM
 
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My initial response was NO  WAY, but then I realized that you are in Switzerland and I"m sure your train situation is very different from the few experiences that I've had in the U.S.

 

Someone above mentioned flying. I flew from Ohio/New York state to Florida several times alone starting at the age of 6. I can't remember if I had layovers, but probably. Back then though, I think flying was different. People still dressed up to do it (according to my Mom's rules) and I think flight attendants were more often ask to help a child flying alone. Now with all the "no frills" I don't know how those requests are taken.

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#63 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 11:51 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Hoopin' Mama View Post

Someone above mentioned flying. I flew from Ohio/New York state to Florida several times alone starting at the age of 6. I can't remember if I had layovers, but probably. Back then though, I think flying was different. People still dressed up to do it (according to my Mom's rules) and I think flight attendants were more often ask to help a child flying alone. Now with all the "no frills" I don't know how those requests are taken.


It's my understanding that here, at least (in Canada), they no longer allow unaccompanied kids below a certain age (I think it's something like 12).

 


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#64 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 12:31 PM
 
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I think you are the only one who can assess her maturity level and whether she is ready or not and I think it is your choice as a parent. With that being said, I would not allow my six year old to travel on a train alone. Crimes often happen when there is opportunity and even if a child is very mature mentally, they are likely physically too small at the age of six to defend themselves.

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#65 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 01:33 PM
 
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I don't think it's a big deal in Switzerland. I was there a few years ago and its not like going on the metro in Washington DC where I live. But you never know who is on that train. I say stick with your idea and send her one stop but have a friend watching her from the end of the train. Just to be on the safe side. Or go over scenarios of unexpected things that could happen, and when you both feel comfortable with how she replies, send her on her way.

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#66 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 01:57 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Owen'nZoe View Post

Velochic -

 

What is it about the US that makes you say "no" here when you might say "yes" there? Is it because most kids here have less experience using public transport? Or because our public transport in many places tends to be used by sketchier people? Is it the public transport part that would make you say no, or the independence part?

 

 

 

I'll answer, though it is a generalization. Because kids here are given more freedoms and opportunities to develop independence, from an earlier age. You could even say starting from birth, when I could park the pram outside a store while my baby was sleeping and hop inside to buy something. If my baby woke up crying, someone would just come in the store and say "hey, baby crying in pram outside." I'd go right out and get her. If young kids are outside playing by themselves, people think it is normal. If I am sitting at the playground and my 4 yo says she wants to go home and get her bike and bike back here, I say OK and stay at the playground talking with the other parents. Now if my child said she wanted me to come with her, of course I would! But I assume she can, she wants to do it herself, and these small steps allow her to develop confidence in herself and her capabilities.

 

So kids that desire independence have had practice. Lots of it. Practice gives them the confidence to want more responsibility, and to be able to handle it. 

 

We are not talking leaving a 4 or 6 yo at home for 5 hours by themselves. Or on a 5 hour train ride where they had to be responsible for buying a ticket, changing trains.... This would probably be very sad for the child. Or stressful. Or both. But when children desire to do things on their own, it is great to have the freedom to allow it. 

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#67 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 02:02 PM - Thread Starter
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As for the life vest, in my world people of all ages wear life vests on boats. My family is a boating family and that is just a safety issue. There will be a day when DD takes the train all by herself and if we are still living in Switzerland, it will probably be before she is 13. She takes the train to go to ice skating lessons and swim lessons now. I am sure she will want to go with her friends and without her mom. lol.gif I just want her to start out small with baby steps and work her way up to going to skating all by herself or with her friend. 

 

Oh and a couple of people mentioned getting lost at the station or forgetting her backpack. In Switzerland each train line arrives at the same platform each and every time. The town that DD would take the train to only has 2 tracks through the town and no real "station" and since it is the end for this train line, the train pulls off to platform 3, lets everyone off and sits for 10 minutes. DH would meet her on platform 3 and I could even tell him which car she'd be on because the train only runs with 3 cars during the day. If she didn't get off, he could just get on the train. Swiss trains are very predictable, clean, and safe. 
 

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Originally Posted by acdmama View Post





However you decide to celebrate, I hope your daughter has a GREAT birthday!

 


Thanks! I am sure she will have a good birthday - it is tomorrow BTW. I don't want to tie this to her birthday because I don't want her to think that her birthday is a failure if she decides she isn't ready. We have some special stuff planned but it is nothing like riding a train by herself. More like dinner out and a party. love.gif

 



Quote:
Originally Posted by MamaMunchkin View Post

Dear OP, 

 

Is it your DD's bday yet?  Have you decided what to do?  

 

I sense that you're not 100% comfortable eventhough it's something that's acceptable in Switzerland?  Do you have any particular concerns in mind?

 

 

 



My biggest concern is that she will decide she wants to do it and get scared or change her mind mid-trip. I really do think it is safe, it is just whether or not she is overestimating her readiness. She has been rather clingy on the trains the last few days - choosing to sit on the stairs by me and the stroller instead of a seat - so I am thinking she has changed her mind. 

 

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Originally Posted by StephandOwen View Post

At 6 years old my son would not have been ready to do that (he's 7 1/2 now and still isn't).

 

Would you consider letting her do it if someone you knew (a family friend or relative) was on the train with her (even if she didn't know they were there) to keep an eye on things? She could feel independent and you could still know she was safe.


Well, the way the train is set up, if someone went along, she'd know. The cars are rather small and she is good at picking out people she knows half way down the platform. Her class goes on the train to the next town for the dentist (her teacher + 15 kids) and they also take an end of the year trip to the forest which is a train and a bus away. (3 teachers and about 40 kids) She did that last year with no problem. She is comfortable taking the train with me or with friends and light supervision. 

 

Tomorrow we have to go get her junior card for riding the train. She is no longer free when she rides with me. 

 

xposted with AllisonR - she is spot on. 

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#68 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 02:40 PM
 
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I would find out legally what age is allowed and take it from there.

 

 

I know that many states (in the US) have a set age to be left home alone, I would use that as a rough guide and then factor in child maturity and situation (day/night/cost/familiarity, etc).


Actually, only 2 states (Maryland and Illinois) have such laws. Several other states have guidelines, but nothing as far as legality. Most states have neither. I think every child and situation is different, and considerations must be made for each of them.

 

OP, I would have no problem with what you describe.

 

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#69 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 03:45 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Hoopin' Mama View Post

 

Someone above mentioned flying. I flew from Ohio/New York state to Florida several times alone starting at the age of 6. I can't remember if I had layovers, but probably. Back then though, I think flying was different. People still dressed up to do it (according to my Mom's rules) and I think flight attendants were more often ask to help a child flying alone. Now with all the "no frills" I don't know how those requests are taken.

5-7 children can travel as unaccompanied minors ONLY on direct flights

8 + for flights with stopovers/layovers

 

and 12+ for travellign alone.

 

as unaccompanied minors you have to pay an extra around $100 for the services of a flight attendant.

 

about children being left alone here in California i have discovered many parents leave their kids alone at the age of 6 onwards under the tutteledge of nieghbours next door. not on a regular basis but once in a while. the kids and my dd loves it.

 

 


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#70 of 120 Old 03-31-2011, 07:53 PM
 
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Originally Posted by lalaland42 View Post
My biggest concern is that she will decide she wants to do it and get scared or change her mind mid-trip. I really do think it is safe, it is just whether or not she is overestimating her readiness. She has been rather clingy on the trains the last few days - choosing to sit on the stairs by me and the stroller instead of a seat - so I am thinking she has changed her mind. 

Yeah, I know what you mean - a 6-yr old can be very unpredictable.  Well, if I were you I'll wait until she ... really orngtongue.gif... begs for a solo train ride then.  I do like your idea of giving her a cellphone during her first ride.  Hope she has a great bday party! 


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#71 of 120 Old 04-01-2011, 03:46 AM - Thread Starter
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So I was chatting with a local friend of mine about this. She has a daughter the same age as my daughter and a son 2 years older. She thought it was a good idea and that my daughter and her two big kids should all go together. I can just imagine them giggling the whole way. Anyway, this is probably a better idea and good practice for the kids. My DD is overwhelmed by her birthday today so I am going to wait to bring it up. :) 

 

I can't believe my baby is getting so big! 

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#72 of 120 Old 04-01-2011, 06:16 AM
 
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http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-462091/How-children-lost-right-roam-generations.html

 

Look at the picture comparing the freedom of eight year olds over 4 generations.

 

I think it's probably fine in Switzerland.  In the US you have to wait longer because IMO people feel better about themselves if they are policing the "safety" of other people's children, e.g., putting their own standards onto others, even if they have not done one iota of research on risk.

 

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#73 of 120 Old 04-01-2011, 02:45 PM
 
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I spent time in Germany, where kids are taught to be independent very early.  It was normal to see 4 & 5 y-o children walking by themselves to kindergarten or down to the bakery.  Most villages were quite safe -- everybody knows everybody, and strangers are noticed.  We saw plenty of youth traveling alone by train and allowed our two to take a short train trip when they were 8 & 10, traveling together.

 

Assuming things are similar in Switzerland, 6 still seems a bit young for the train, but if Mom puts the child on the train and she is met by Dad at the next stop, I'd think it's perfectly safe.  An alternative might be to arrange for a friend, an 8 or 10 yo, to travel together with the child. 

 

I lean toward the "free-range kid" idea -- grow safety skills and help the child build competency step by step.  My pint-sized daughter always had a strong independent streak and a boatload of over-confidence.  I had to walk the line between teaching her a reasonable degree of caution while letting her gain experience.  Now at 17 she has traveled alone by train, plane, and bus.  She is a competent world traveler, and doesn't need Mummy anymore! Boo-hoo!

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#74 of 120 Old 04-01-2011, 03:16 PM
 
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i didn't read all the comments but what you described sounds fine to me. My biggest concern would be her missing her stop but you've already accounted for that. 

 

i think that is a very safe way to add a little independence. have you been to freerangekids.wordpress.com ? she let her son ride the NYC train home. by himself. :D what a tizzy it stirred up! 


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#75 of 120 Old 04-01-2011, 05:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by onyxravnos View Post

i didn't read all the comments but what you described sounds fine to me. My biggest concern would be her missing her stop but you've already accounted for that. 

 

i think that is a very safe way to add a little independence. have you been to freerangekids.wordpress.com ? she let her son ride the NYC train home. by himself. :D what a tizzy it stirred up! 


Okay, feel compelled to put the NYC subway story in context, since I see it referenced here a lot on MDC as an example of free range.  First, it was the national media who made a big issue out of this, not New Yorkers.  The hard reality is that a lot of people view the NYC subway as a "dangerous place" and I would guess that a lot of these people are non-NYers.  Second, thousands, even hundreds of thousands of kids ride the subway every day here, even by themselves.  That is the way kids get to school...we don't have yellow buses here except in private school situations.  It cracks me up that this story reached such a wide audience, given that 9 year olds riding the subway is such a common occurrence here.  Most kids travel with their siblings and in groups of kids, but no one really gives a thought to the 8 to 10 year old set riding the subway.  The woman who wrote the blog entry was, let's say, making a bigger deal out of it than the rest of us who consider it commonplace.  I think only NYers will understand the following:  it it is privileged mentality.  "Oh gosh, my kid road the subway by himself!  I'm so special and avant garde!"  I don't mean to be snarky, but there are very distinct class systems here and this is prime example.  JMHO.

 


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Quote:
Okay, feel compelled to put the NYC subway story in context, since I see it referenced here a lot on MDC as an example of free range.  First, it was the national media who made a big issue out of this, not New Yorkers.  The hard reality is that a lot of people view the NYC subway as a "dangerous place" and I would guess that a lot of these people are non-NYers.  Second, thousands, even hundreds of thousands of kids ride the subway every day here, even by themselves.  That is the way kids get to school...we don't have yellow buses here except in private school situations.  It cracks me up that this story reached such a wide audience, given that 9 year olds riding the subway is such a common occurrence here.  Most kids travel with their siblings and in groups of kids, but no one really gives a thought to the 8 to 10 year old set riding the subway.  The woman who wrote the blog entry was, let's say, making a bigger deal out of it than the rest of us who consider it commonplace.  I think only NYers will understand the following:  it it is privileged mentality.  "Oh gosh, my kid road the subway by himself!  I'm so special and avant garde!"  I don't mean to be snarky, but there are very distinct class systems here and this is prime example.  JMHO.

you forgot to mention-this doesn't just happen in NYC

 

many cities you public transportation, that means buses as well

 

go for it!

 

 

 

 

Quote:
 because IMO people feel better about themselves if they are policing the "safety" of other people's children, e.g., putting their own standards onto others, even if they have not done one iota of research on risk

 

soooooooooooo true!


 

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you forgot to mention-this doesn't just happen in NYC

 

many cities you public transportation, that means buses as well

 

go for it!

 

 

 

 

 

soooooooooooo true!


I didn't forget...just not qualified to speak for other locales!  orngbiggrin.gif

 


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#78 of 120 Old 04-02-2011, 06:49 AM
 
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In the US you have to wait longer because IMO people feel better about themselves if they are policing the "safety" of other people's children, e.g., putting their own standards onto others, even if they have not done one iota of research on risk.

 



I get what you're saying, but I think it's worth thinking a bit deeper on the subject.  While it's annoying and potentially very problematic (I'm thinking unnecessary CPS intervention) to deal with "busy bodies", on the flip side I think it is important for us all to watch out for the safety of kids - all kids - and not just bury our heads in the sand, thinking we should only look out for our own.  If I see a young kid who is by themselves I *do* pay a little extra attention.  No, I don't jump in and freak out and call the nearest cop, but I might just keep an eye on them for a bit.  For example, where I live is right on a busy commercial street in a big city.  If I saw a toddler or preschooler seemingly without an adult (on that street) I'd stay close until I could tell that there was in fact someone with them who was just a bit farther back down the street (this has happened a few times).  In the OP's scenario (6yo on a train) I might just keep an eye out and if, by some slim chance, the child did get hassled or seemed scared, etc, I would approach them to see if they needed my help.  I'm a friendly mommy and I'd like to think that in the very small off-chance that a kid was by themselves and actually needed help, I'd be able to give that help.  Just yesterday my friend took her 2yo to the Botanical Gardens and he managed to run off and hide in the split second that she took her eyes off him.  If I was in her shoes I'd be very grateful for someone "policing the safety of other people's children" if it meant keeping an eye on him until he could be safely reunited with his mom.


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Okay, feel compelled to put the NYC subway story in context, since I see it referenced here a lot on MDC as an example of free range.  First, it was the national media who made a big issue out of this, not New Yorkers.  The hard reality is that a lot of people view the NYC subway as a "dangerous place" and I would guess that a lot of these people are non-NYers.  Second, thousands, even hundreds of thousands of kids ride the subway every day here, even by themselves.  That is the way kids get to school...we don't have yellow buses here except in private school situations.  It cracks me up that this story reached such a wide audience, given that 9 year olds riding the subway is such a common occurrence here.  Most kids travel with their siblings and in groups of kids, but no one really gives a thought to the 8 to 10 year old set riding the subway.  The woman who wrote the blog entry was, let's say, making a bigger deal out of it than the rest of us who consider it commonplace.  I think only NYers will understand the following:  it it is privileged mentality.  "Oh gosh, my kid road the subway by himself!  I'm so special and avant garde!"  I don't mean to be snarky, but there are very distinct class systems here and this is prime example.  JMHO.

 


I have posted the same thing several times.  I live in Brooklyn and see many kids taking the subway by themselves every day.  They have to if their school is not within walking distance and there isn't anyone available to travel with them- yellow school buses are only provided up to 3rd grade.  The furor over the article was completely a class thing - the big deal was a middle class journalist's 9 year old son taking the subway by himself not "a nine year old".  My 4 year old has taken the subway almost every day of her life.  By the time she is 8 or 9, I can't see there being any problem with her taking it without me. 

 

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I have posted the same thing several times.  I live in Brooklyn and see many kids taking the subway by themselves every day.  They have to if their school is not within walking distance and there isn't anyone available to travel with them- yellow school buses are only provided up to 3rd grade.  The furor over the article was completely a class thing - the big deal was a middle class journalist's 9 year old son taking the subway by himself not "a nine year old".  My 4 year old has taken the subway almost every day of her life.  By the time she is 8 or 9, I can't see there being any problem with her taking it without me. 

 


Cool!  I'm in Brooklyn and have a 4.5 year old.  Subway is a way of life.  Nice to see you here.!

 


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#81 of 120 Old 04-02-2011, 05:22 PM
 
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I live in Toronto Canada, and my DD is less than 2 yrs old. So I may not be qualified to answer. BUT, I do ride the subway (and other public transit) with our child all the time. She will be using transit to get around the city for much of her life. I want her to have the skills and confidence to manouver her way around town. At 6 I do not know if I would let her go alone, as the subway is large and very crowded. But maybe on a sunday afternoon near the end of the line.

 

I do plan by 6 or 7 to have her ride alone in a car ahead of me and get herself home. I want to know for sure that if we did ever get separated that she could find her way to her own neighbourhood. There is the possibility of getting separated on the subway here with an older kid. The doors open and close so quickly, I have almost been separated from my nephew when I got off the train and he almost didn't. In that situation I would want my kid to be able to stay clam, ride to the next stop and get off the train and wait for me on the platforms bench or something.

 

My DD is only 20months and already is showing signs of knowing her way around her neighbourhood by recognizing that landmarks are coming up ahead before they are in view.

 

OP, I like the idea that your friend had, of having your DD and her two kids do it alone. In that case I would even allow them to go further, like two or three stops. And then I would build up to them getting off at a stop that wasn't the end of the line. And then build up to transferring trains, etc. It is an excellent skill to have if she is going to be expected to travel on transit without adult supervision at some point.


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#82 of 120 Old 04-02-2011, 08:28 PM
 
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If I thought my child was ready, I would do it.   

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#83 of 120 Old 04-03-2011, 06:25 PM - Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by colsxjack View Post

 

I do plan by 6 or 7 to have her ride alone in a car ahead of me and get herself home. I want to know for sure that if we did ever get separated that she could find her way to her own neighbourhood. There is the possibility of getting separated on the subway here with an older kid. The doors open and close so quickly, I have almost been separated from my nephew when I got off the train and he almost didn't. In that situation I would want my kid to be able to stay clam, ride to the next stop and get off the train and wait for me on the platforms bench or something.

 

 

That actually almost happened on Friday. I have a rule that kids get on or off the train first and then me because I can block the doors with my arms or body but DD can't. On Friday, I had DS in the stroller and DD on foot. I told her to get on the train when the doors opened and she did. Then someone got off the train with 2 huge duffel bags and blocked the door entrance. I said excuse me quite loudly several times but they did not move. The train doors started to close and I had to leave the stroller to block them open. Meanwhile other passengers were helping me by holding the stroller. Thankfully the person finally moved eyesroll.gif and I was able to get on the train with 2 people helping me get the stroller up the stairs and on the train. I was sure that the train doors were going to close with DD inside and once the train doors close, that is it.

 

A friend of mine got separated from her visiting adult brother and parents when she got off the train but they didn't know they needed to hurry so the train doors closed and the train left. She had to get in touch with the conductor and have someone tell them how to get on the return train since they don't speak German. 

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#84 of 120 Old 04-04-2011, 09:16 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ar2974 View Post




I have posted the same thing several times.  I live in Brooklyn and see many kids taking the subway by themselves every day.  They have to if their school is not within walking distance and there isn't anyone available to travel with them- yellow school buses are only provided up to 3rd grade.  The furor over the article was completely a class thing - the big deal was a middle class journalist's 9 year old son taking the subway by himself not "a nine year old".  My 4 year old has taken the subway almost every day of her life.  By the time she is 8 or 9, I can't see there being any problem with her taking it without me. 

 

I think part of it is a class thing, and part is a location thing. In my experience, outside of the large cities in the US there seems to be a perception of public transportation as dangerous and full of undesireables. This fear of public transport is a very US suburban mentality that you really don't find in Europe. I put a lot of it down to the American car culture - some people only feel safe in their car, where they can kid themselves that their car seat can protect their child from all the evil and danger in the world ;-)

 

 

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#85 of 120 Old 04-04-2011, 09:48 AM
 
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Originally Posted by choli View Post

 

I think part of it is a class thing, and part is a location thing. In my experience, outside of the large cities in the US there seems to be a perception of public transportation as dangerous and full of undesireables. This fear of public transport is a very US suburban mentality that you really don't find in Europe. I put a lot of it down to the American car culture - some people only feel safe in their car, where they can kid themselves that their car seat can protect their child from all the evil and danger in the world ;-)
 

 


 

I just wanted to take a small exception to this. I grew up in an urban (not suburban) environment. I took the city bus frequently, including taking it to school. However, where I lived, the public busses truly were not safe. The busses were dirty and were covered with gang tags. It wasn't an every day occurance, but I did witness fights and drug deals on the bus, and was mugged after getting off one once. It isn't always just an issue of perception - in some places it is the cold hard reality.

 

Where I live now, the bus system is used largely by the poor and by college students. It is safe, but most suburbanites won't use it. Here, I agree completely with you - it is an issue of perception.

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#86 of 120 Old 04-06-2011, 06:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by KCMichigan View Post

I would find out legally what age is allowed and take it from there.

 

 

I know that many states (in the US) have a set age to be left home alone, I would use that as a rough guide and then factor in child maturity and situation (day/night/cost/familiarity, etc).

 

I also would make sure the train staff (if there is one) knew and could keep and eye out.

 

 

Also know that once you do allow her to ride alone, you will face her asking to do it more and more often so make sure you are comfortable with it.

 

 

No, I would not let my child ride our city buses at 5/6 alone- I probably would pick an age around 10 and have set rules/places/times as well and encourage buddy travel until they are older.

 

But in a different culture, it may be the norm and safer than in our area.


Actually, it's only 2 states out of 50 that I'm aware of that have any laws about when kids can be left alone.  I see misquotes about this all the time, and it just isn't so.  However the culture is moving in that direction, one I personally find highly annoying and disrespectful to children and also harmful.  If we don't given them any freedom / responsibility / consequences in childhood (COMMESURATE WITH THEIR INDIVIDUAL ABILITIES AS JUDGED BY THE PARENTS WHO LOVE THEM) look the heck out when they become teenagers.  I also think it's physically dangerous and a contributor to childhood obesity.  Our county pools recently moved the age to be there alone from 9 to 13.  What a waste!  So in the middle of the hot summer do you think all these lower and lower middle income 9 year olds home alone are going to be better off biking to the neighborhood pool, or watching Teen Mom while eating chips and talking on the phone?

 

I was left alone regularly for fairly long periods (given that my home was 15 minutes from the nearest store and 30 minutes from anyone's work) about age 9, and was fully capable of taking care of myself.  I am sure I was left home alone for briefer times before that, e.g, mom going to the neighbor's 3 houses down while I wanted to watch TV.  I know I wandered pretty far alone way before 9. 

 


 

 

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#87 of 120 Old 04-15-2011, 09:35 AM
 
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Originally Posted by caedenmomma View Post

Nope, I wouldn't feel comfortable with this.  At minimum, I would send an adult friend of mine to watch her like a hawk (you don't have to tell your DD about that plan).  I understand it is only a 3 minute ride.  I also understand that it could take less than 3 minutes for a monster to do something horrible.


This is maybe what I would do if my DD felt very strongly about it. I do let my 5 yo do rides on a fair by herself, but then I can watch her all the time.

I did grow up in Europe, but I still feel that such a solo trainride would give her a false sense of safety. A child this young has no idea what bad things could happen, they just want to test their "train knowledge". Not their crisis management skills. In 3 minutes chances are small that something will happen, but it is possible and then there is no adult. It reminds me of a note at our local swim school. It says that they don't want to have 3 year olds at the swimming lessons, because they will get a false sense of their abilities and actually have a higher chance of drowning than a child that did not have swimming lessons.

 

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#88 of 120 Old 04-16-2011, 10:23 AM
 
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If I lived in the suburbs of Zurich, yes.  But I live in Bogota...so no.

 

 

 


Rebekah - mom to Ben 03/05 and Emily 01/10, a peace educator, and a veg*n and wife to Jamie.
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#89 of 120 Old 04-16-2011, 12:02 PM
 
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No way in Hell! If I ever saw a young child alone on a train I'd call the conductor and make a HUGE deal out of it and if they didn't do anything you bet your ass that I'd follow that child (but not in a scary way for them) and have a word with their parents!
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#90 of 120 Old 04-16-2011, 12:06 PM
 
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Originally Posted by MamitaM View Post

No way in Hell! If I ever saw a young child alone on a train I'd call the conductor and make a HUGE deal out of it and if they didn't do anything you bet your ass that I'd follow that child (but not in a scary way for them) and have a word with their parents!


wow. really?

 


Pardon me while I puke.gif

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