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#1 of 38 Old 10-09-2011, 04:19 PM - Thread Starter
 
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My brain isn't working right now so replace "thingies" with...whatever I was intending to say. lol 

I was thinking of giving DS an allowance...$5 a month because he's 5 years old. I thought maybe doing a dollar a week and the extra dollar on the last day... and attach each dollar at the end of a week on a calendar and mark off the chores written on it when he does them, and then he gets his dollar? Or does anyone have a better idea? And what chores do you have for your 5-ish-year-old? (He'll be 6 in December.)


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#2 of 38 Old 10-09-2011, 11:14 PM
 
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yikes mama. do you think a dollar a month is the right amount. 5 bucks a week seems fair. 

 

gosh if you make the $$$ amount too low its not worth him doing anything. 

 

dd has been getting 5 bucks a week since she turned 5 from her dad for folding and putting clothes away, sweeping the floor, the backyard, sorting the clothes into colours. 

 

her dad's philosophy is money for chores. 

 

dunno. i dont go into it. dd does way more chores at my home for no money. she gets no allowance from me. 


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#3 of 38 Old 10-09-2011, 11:46 PM
 
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I don't pay for chores.  Chores are just part of life but DS does get an allowance.  He is 11 and his allowance is in the range of 25-$40/month.  It depends on how much extra $ I have and if he gets a 'bonus' or not.  He is expected to buy some of his own 'stuff'.  Like I don't buy extra Lego sets, video games etc unless its a holiday or birthday.  Friday we were at the craft store, I 'needed' yarn for a new project.  Once we were there DS decided he 'needed' halloween socks and some wooden cut outs for halloween.  He paid for his items, about $6.00.  He also has a very difficult time keeping track of chapstick, I will get him 1 tube every few months, after that DS needs to buy his own.  Granted the chapstick is like a buck but I am not buying that every couple weeks.  

 

I should say DS has his own bank account and pre-paid card, 2 different things. So its easy for me to log on and just transfer $$ to him.  I have shown him how to log on and view his account, monitor his transactions, access money at the ATM, etc.

 

I will say DS is more conscious of coupons (like at the craft store) and watches for sales for the stuff he wants.  Surprisingly he doesn't loose things as often either.

 

In the next couple years I see his allowance increasing to cover the difference in the cost of clothes.  For example I budget $25 for jeans and he wants the $50 jeans, he can make up the difference type thing.  Right now I cover everything.  Plus he really doesn't go 'out' with friends.

 


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#4 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 08:32 AM
 
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My daughters are 6.5 and 5.  Beginning just before dd1's 5th birthday I started to give allowance-- one quarter for every year each week.  So now she gets 6 quarters and my youngest 5 (no extra for 5.5!)  We do not tie allowance to chores.  Allowance is for learning about how to handle money, both emotionally and financially.  And, wow!  What big lessons!  I'm glad that the lessons are learned with 1.50 and not 20.00.   In the 2 years we have come a long way.  DD2 started getting allowance, but at first only because her sister got it.  They also get "extra allowance" for lost teeth and birthdays.

 

The best advice I heard for me was that if it hurts you to see your child blowing his money, then you are giving him too much.  For a 5yo, learning about money, desire-- "dragon lust" we call it after the Hobbit-- is a big enough ride.  Keep it small, keep it simple.

 

As self-employed parents we have the chance to give out kids meaning ful work if they wanted, and they made $25 each dogsitting once.  What a landfall!  They really did all the work for 5 days because I told them it was all-or-nothing.  Now my oldest wants to start a stand and sell jelly.  Well, we'll get to that eventually!

 

 


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#5 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 09:33 AM
 
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btw food for thought. 

 

'me personally' am not into allowance. i never have been. we are super poor so that is a life lesson right there. i have done exercises to teach her the concept of money. yes even at 5. here is $X. you want to eat that for dinner but i have that much of money. this is a list of ingredients we have to buy. shall we change the menu to fit the budget? 

 

when we have money we splurge. when we dont we cant. but its a 'we' thing. not her and me thing. 

 

she gets it. in fact in 3rd grade her teacher was impressed by how much real life experience dd had with money as she was calling out on word problems dealing with cost of things. 


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#6 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 12:31 PM
 
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We don't do allowances,  we do offer something they may want as an incentive.  We plan to get it anyway but I always ask for a little help and they usually give it.  They don't get a lot of stuff so they're always willing to trade their time for something they can finally get.  Sorry I'm no help.  I feel it's this families house and we all like it a certain way.  They like being able to find their clothes and knowing where things are.  I like not stepping on piles to get in their room. 

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#7 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 01:59 PM
 
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DS1 is 7 years old and he gets $7 a week. 50 cents goes into savings, and another 50 cents goes into donation fund. Every March (his birthday) he take the money in the donation fund and finds a charity he'd like to donate to. So really his "take home" is $6. 

 

We don't tie allowance to chores either. We don't buy him any toys (except bdays and christmas, etc). He has to save up to buy video games, toys etc. I have to say I've been pleasantly surprised at how well he does saving his money to buys what he wants. 

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#8 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 03:13 PM
 
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20 dollars a month??? For a five-year-old? That sounds crazy to me. DD's almost five and I can't imagine giving her that much money. And there's no way I could give her 20 a month and DS 28 dollars a month. That's more money than my kids need to have.

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Originally Posted by meemee View Post

yikes mama. do you think a dollar a month is the right amount. 5 bucks a week seems fair. 

 

gosh if you make the $$$ amount too low its not worth him doing anything. 

 

dd has been getting 5 bucks a week since she turned 5 from her dad for folding and putting clothes away, sweeping the floor, the backyard, sorting the clothes into colours. 

 

her dad's philosophy is money for chores. 

 

dunno. i dont go into it. dd does way more chores at my home for no money. she gets no allowance from me. 



 

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#9 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 03:17 PM
 
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I used to give my dd that much (like a dollar per year each week) and she'd want to spend it all on candy. Now I only give as much as I'm willing for her to spend on candy or whatever other garbage she wants. If it's her allowance, IMO she should be able to spend it however she wants, but OTOH I'm not giving her money to buy a ton of candy. She's getting $2.50 a week now and she will usually only spend the 50 cents on candy- I've found that too, that if there's a some-dollar-amount-plus-50-cents, she'll want to spend the 50 cents on candy instead of all of it.
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#10 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 04:51 PM
 
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I would consider giving them money to save for things they may want.  I just don't want to pay them for things.  I would rather we all work together than split up chores.  It works better that way for us.  I don't want it to be oh I can either do this and get some money or not do it and get nothing.  My girls... would never have money if that was in play.  But then again that's just us.  Our family runs to a different tune.  So I've been told by so many.  Oh well.

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#11 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 05:02 PM
 
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Oh yeah, that post reminds me that I don't pay for chores either. Allowance is unrelated.
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#12 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 05:02 PM
 
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Oh yeah, that post reminds me that I don't pay for chores either. Allowance is unrelated.
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#13 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 05:13 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Polliwog View Post

20 dollars a month??? For a five-year-old? That sounds crazy to me. DD's almost five and I can't imagine giving her that much money. And there's no way I could give her 20 a month and DS 28 dollars a month. That's more money than my kids need to have.

well if you are getting paid for chores, isnt that a fair deal.

 

plus the idea was to save up for something. a toy or something you cant buy them. within a month that is an attainable goal. otherwise if you just wanted an icecream at a dollar a week you'd have to save up at least 2 to 3 weeks to get an icecream - a bottom of the line crappy icecream. 

 

i guess if you have more kids that does add up for the parent. 
 

but for dd's dad 5 bucks for a healthy treat a week for a school going child was reasonable. at 6 dd made $20 bucks one afternoon for sweeping a friend's large backyard (she had broken her arm), helping with giving the dog a bath and folding clothes adn putting them away. for the amount of work dd did it was absolutely worth every single penny.  

 


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#14 of 38 Old 10-10-2011, 05:25 PM
 
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Ok meemee, that begs to question... why can't they learn to do things for the joy of helping someone else?  My girls often help the elderly neighbor with all sorts of things.  Payment isn't an option and they do it because he needs the help.  They walk away feeling as though they have done a good thing.  They don't help him for money.  Though with your thinking they could have made a fortune already. 

 

They helped the neighbor lady across the street by watering her yard the week she vacationed.  She gave them 10 each.  Both were puzzled about the whole thing.  Asked me if I wanted the money for the grocery store.  I have a hard time with them getting money to buy "things".  I don't feel good about giving them money to do what needs to be done.  They know I need help sometimes because of my RA and they'll help without me asking.  Or if they see I have a task to accomplish they'll pitch in.  I think it would ruin their view of doing what needs to be done if I put a monetary value on it. 

 

That being said, if I have the money for something they want they get it.  Usually they know I don't have the money for it and they've come to understand that when they do get something it's a treat and not because they had to do my bidding to get it.  Rewarding by praise and appreciation goes a lot further in my mind.

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#15 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 08:17 AM
 
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We don't give money for chores. Chores are part of keeping a family running, and without them, the house falls apart. Chores are not equivalent to a 'job' for a child, IMO, they're part of daily life. I don't get paid for household chores and neither should they.

 

We do, however, give an allowance (when we remember -- right now we're down to about every 3 months because I keep forgetting and my kids don't remind me). We started with $1 or $2 (can't remember) a week at age 5. We then asked the kids to place 1/2 of the money in 'spending', 1/4 in savings and 1/4 in giving. We had separate jars for each.

 

Here's what I discovered: My kids don't spend ANY of the money. Ds will, if prodded, spend some of the giving money. Dd has hopelessly mixed hers (she likes to take out her money and count it), and now she won't spend any of it for charity. (She is, however, willing to do extra chores to earn money for charity -- we have a charity project at church that she's doing extra things for right now.) I'm not very comfortable with the extra chores = money, and probably won't continue it. Dd regularly helps weed the garden, set the table, etc. and I'm afraid this is going to kill her natural desire to help. (Ds, on the other hand, likes to be served and never does extra unless directly asked. however, he doesn't mind parting with his money.)

 

Dd claims she's going to save all her money for college.  However, she's really coveting an American Girl doll, and might be willing to part with her stash for that. (She's trying to talk me into paying for 1/2, as she's 'only' got $50. We're looking on Ebay, and her latest was that she'd pay for the doll and I'd pay for shipping!)

 

My conclusions:

1. Five is too young to start an allowance. They don't really have 'wants' for spending money until they're older. Maybe my kids are less acquisitive than some, but they get money (from relatives) and gifts at Christmas and Birthdays, and we provide basic clothing. We get our books at the library 99% of the time. 10-11 is a better age to start, for my kids at least.

 

2. Chores should be part of the family routine. It makes the child feel like a contributing member of the family. Money for chores diminishes that.


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#16 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 08:44 AM
 
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I don't think 5 is too young for an allowance, at least I don't think that all 5yo's are too young.  It is an iffy age, I'll agree, and parents should be mindful.  Sometimes the only way to find out is to start at some point.  Since it's hard to back out, start small.  Very small.  $1/week is not too small (over $2/week I think is too much).  My girls find all kids of little Playmobil animals (in the bulk bin--guinea pigs are .35, puppies .85, foals 1.50 etc).  They save up for coloring books, larger animals, etc. It's hard for them to save more than about $7 before wanting to spend it.  I'm keeping an eye out for more ambitious desires and the self-discipline to save up for it.  Maybe then we'll up the allowance, but not by much.  They have lots of ways to make money if they want, they could dog-sit or cat-sit, they can figure it out.


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#17 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 10:58 AM
 
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Quote:
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Ok meemee, that begs to question... why can't they learn to do things for the joy of helping someone else?  My girls often help the elderly neighbor with all sorts of things.  Payment isn't an option and they do it because he needs the help.  They walk away feeling as though they have done a good thing.  They don't help him for money.  Though with your thinking they could have made a fortune already. 

 

They helped the neighbor lady across the street by watering her yard the week she vacationed.  She gave them 10 each.  Both were puzzled about the whole thing.  Asked me if I wanted the money for the grocery store.  I have a hard time with them getting money to buy "things".  I don't feel good about giving them money to do what needs to be done.  They know I need help sometimes because of my RA and they'll help without me asking.  Or if they see I have a task to accomplish they'll pitch in.  I think it would ruin their view of doing what needs to be done if I put a monetary value on it. 

 

That being said, if I have the money for something they want they get it.  Usually they know I don't have the money for it and they've come to understand that when they do get something it's a treat and not because they had to do my bidding to get it.  Rewarding by praise and appreciation goes a lot further in my mind.

Hey Im. i get you and i agree with you. i was describing dd's dad's point of view and why he does what he does. i differ from him.  we dont do allowance at home coz for us a lot of decisions are centered around money. so the concept of money happens naturally. 

 

charity and savings. now savings obviously dd gets because if she wants a new game she has to save for it. however with charity - we have more time than money and dd is involved with that process. so for her charity is inherent. not something you do if you have money to spare. its something you do because you see the need around you. 

 

i hate the focus on 'money'. i'm more about concepts and money for our family is not the way to learn them. 

 

 


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#18 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 11:10 AM
 
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We don't do allowance.  It is something we're talking about right now, so that my change.  They won't get an allowance for chores though.  I really can't imagine giving my 5 year old $20 a month though.

 

My kids have chores and a chore chart.  When they've filled up their chart, they can exchange it for a coupon.  These coupons are for picking the movie on movie night or staying up late, things like that.  Chores are part of our family and we all do our part.  The chores I put on their chore chart are things I need them to work on, like making beds.  It just helps make it a habit in a positive way, not a nagging way.

 

We do pay for extra jobs.   That's a good way of getting them to understand that they can make extra money by doing a job and doing it well.  We only buy them toys/games on birthdays and Christmas so any other things they want to buy, they do with their own money. 

 

My 5 year old's chores are:

 

helping unload the dishwasher

keeping his room clean

setting the table

dealing with his laundry (I wash, he puts away)

making his bed

 

Weekly, my kids (5 and 9) clean their areas; bedrooms, playroom and bathroom. 

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#19 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 11:33 AM
 
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I gave my dd a dollar a week at that age.  I think it is a nice amount because she got enough to spend on the things she wanted by saving without getting so much that she would start getting a bunch of junk for the sake of getting junk.  I think a large allowance teaches kids to be materialistic, though for some kids making it too small can do the same if what they really want is to spend. 

 

As it turned out my dd really didn't want to spend it that often for the first couple years.  She really planned her purchases and was fine saving it up for long periods of time.  She did go through a really big spending splurge stage when she was seven but has learned a lot about how nice it is to plan purchases because of that.  She didn't learn the first time she blew her money on an immediate want then didn't have money for something she had been planning for, but after a few months of splurging and realizing she didn't really play with the splurges once she had them she was able to go back to planning on her own.  When she was seven I raised her allowance to $2 a week because she is saving for bigger things, like an American Girl Doll, now and I want to make it more attainable.  She also gets to choose what to do with her birthday money, usually she puts most of it into savings and keeps about $20.

 

I don't link allowance to chores because they are a requirement, I am not okay with my dd deciding not to do chores because she doesn't care about having her allowance for the week.  I do make up jobs and pay her a little extra sometimes when she is really eager to make some extra money and she can earn extra money by walking the dog for her grandpa though.  I think that if you decide to link allowance to chores you need to pick chores that you don't mind having to do yourself and you need to be comfortable not paying him when he doesn't live up to his part of the deal.

 

 

 

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#20 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 11:44 AM
 
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We don't do allowances (and don't intend to), and chores are part of being a member of the household. We all need to help out. However, 6 year old DD does have the option of doing extra tasks for money (as will DS when he's older). She knows it's an option, so when she feels she needs/wants more money, she comes to talk to me. We discuss what all I need done, she throws in her ideas, we agree on the task(s), and then negotiate reasonable compensation. The opportunity to learn to manage money is certainly there, but that money must be earned. Reason being, I want my kids to learn that in a family everyone needs to work together to keep the household running smoothly, even if they aren't getting a monetary reward for it, I want them to understand the importance of hard work, and the value of money. At the moment, DD's chores consist of clearing and cleaning the table after meals and snacks, putting away toys, putting away clean dishes, putting her laundry in the washing machine (I wash and fold), putting away her clean clothes, keeping her room tidy, taking out the garbage, and taking scraps to the compost heap. To earn money, common tasks include sweeping and scrubbing the kitchen floor, wiping down cabinets, reorganizing the pots and pans (which her 14 month old brother loves to reek havoc on), weeding the garden, vaccuming, and helping to clean out the fridge. I pay her very little for these tasks (usually $0.10-$2.00), but we have very little coming in to begin with, we live very simply, and I want her to learn to save, stretch, and choose what's really important to her.

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#21 of 38 Old 10-11-2011, 11:58 AM
 
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It's good to teach them that in order for all things to run smoothly we all need to pitch in.  The girls know that if mama spends a lot of time cleaning, then they have less time with me to play around.  It's much more fun to get it all done together and then find something fun to do with all our extra time. 

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#22 of 38 Old 10-12-2011, 10:33 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Hmm. Lots of things to think about. I have a hard time agreeing with the "no allowance for chores" thing but at the same time I have a hard time disagreeing with it too. Perhaps, he could have his very basic chores (pick up after himself, etc.) and does those regardless, and then has "extras" that he does for allowance. I do want him to understand that there's crap you gotta do that you'll never get paid for, but I also want him to start understanding the awesomeness of doing something and getting paid for it. 

For the basic you-do-it-no-matter-what things (picking up after himself is really the main one for me) ... how the bloody hell do I "enforce" it? It just snowballs and then I feel overwhelmed. For a while there it was okay because I was telling him throughout the day to pick up X, Y and Z, but lately I've been so busy with school and no one else in the house bothers to ask him to pick up (it's a long, LONG story why this is even an issue lol and it would probably be more deserving of its own thread). 

I definitely think $5 a week would be way too much. Honestly, he NEVER spends his money. He's got lots of change in a couple banks right now and he NEVER spends it. So I'm not worried about him blowing it all on candy either. lol (He never asks for that stuff when I go to the store either, phew! The worst habit he has is asking me on our Friday movie nights for a "heat-em-up" aka one of those horrid Kid Cuisine TV dinners, yick! lol)


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#23 of 38 Old 10-12-2011, 11:18 PM
 
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I set aside specific times for chores, and we have a pretty strict "work before play" rule. DD understands that if she wants to have fun, she needs to take care of her responsibilities first. If she doesn't want to do her chores, that's fine, but nothing fun is happening until she does. Once, she decided she didn't want to do chores anymore. It lasted about a week. I didn't really make a big deal out of it, and stepped in to handle her share of household duties. A few times she came up to me wanting to do something with me (like play a game) and I responded with "Sweetie, I would love to play Shoots & Ladders with you, but you don't want to help out around the house anymore, so I have a lot more work to do now. I just don't have time to play anymore." She decided to start doing her chores again pretty quickly. It's never been a problem since. For awhile she did have a problem with forgetting, and as did I with a newborn in the house, so during that time period I set alarms on my phone and posted checklists. The alarms were to remind me that it was time for a certain transition period, like the one that went off an hour before her bedtime so I could remind her to make sure she had everything done and get a story picked out, while I made chammomile tea and started getting the baby settled down. That way we both had the chance to do what we needed to do, and then we still had plenty of time to cuddle up for story time before bed. I have a really hard time falling into a routine, so the alarms were pretty important on my end. As for the checklists, there was a morning checklist on the bathroom door (the first place she headed in the morning) to remind her of what needed to be done before school, an evening checklist beside it to remind her of what needed to be done before bed, and an afternoon checklist on the front door for her to check before she ran out to play. After awhile we fell into the routine and neither of us really needed any of that anymore, though any time our routine changes, she asks for new checklists. She really likes doing things on her own and loved the checklists because they were a tool to help her get everything done, but still all by herself.

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#24 of 38 Old 10-14-2011, 09:03 PM
 
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My kid are 10 and 12 and they have each gotten an allowance for years.  They started at $2/week and stayed there.  Then they both went to $10/month.  DD is now in junior high and when she started junior high we moved her allowance to $25/month.

 

The purpose of an allowance, in our household, is to teach money handling skills.  It is not, therefore, tied to chores.  Basic chores are done because they are part of a family and without doing basic chores a household would fall apart.  Very occasionally there are extra chores that may be paid.  One thing about not tieing chores and allowance: if you say that you do chores to get allowance, that implies the option of NOT doing chores if you don't want the allowance.  It is a very common issue with teens to decide that they would rather not do the chores and not get the money.

 

Allowance is, as I said, about money handling/budgeting.  Because of that, when the kids first started getting allowance they were given it in coins and had to count the money to us.  So, identify the different coins and then count it up to $2.  This wasn't an issue for them, but I'm not sure when that is a common skill (DS was doing this by four).  For us, it really cut down on them wanting us to buy them small things because we just put it on their "list" and the could buy things themselves.  They were responsible for candy, knick knacks and whatever else they wanted to buy.

 

Our goal, though, is for them to be more self-sufficient as they get older.  DD is 12 now and gets more money but also has more monetary responsiblities.  Instead of just buying things she wants, she is also responsible for buying her friends birthday gifts, dance/activity fees at school (not things like books or participation fees, but the small admission fees they put on dances and other after school events).  She has also bought herself a few items of clothing when I said no (like this fall, I had already bought her a hoodie on vacation, so she had 3-5 lightweight jackets and she wanted another: she bought that one).

 

Ideally, each year or so we would add more money to their allowance and more responsiblities to what they are responsible to buy.  I know that some families even make each child responsible for at least one bill (they provide the money, but the kid needs to open the bill, look at the bill, arrange for a check to be sent through bill pay, etc...).  We'll see if we do that.  I would definatley like them to eventually be responsible for all their school costs, their clothing, and their outside of family entertainment.  Let me be clear: I don't expect them to earn the money to pay for it, we will provide it.  Rather, I want them to be responsible for budgeting and physically making the payments.

 

As for the OP.  You also asked about chores for a five year old.  Possible chores:

- unload dishwasher

- set table

- collect garbage from around house

- take out recycling

- make bed

- put non-hangable clothes away

- put whites away from laundry

- pet care

 

Good luck!


 

 

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#25 of 38 Old 10-15-2011, 05:52 AM
 
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I also don't tie chores to the allowance, although that's something that husband and I didn't agree on at first, and I'm still not sure he understands the way I'm doing it.

 

My twins are 6 1/2 . I give each boy (little sister is too young) $12 a month.  Half I have already dumped into their savings account for the whole year, which means they see 6 a month. I've been paying every three months (becasue I'm having a hard time remembering, and it does seem 'better' to get 18 dollars rather than 6 at payday.).  They are responsible for paying for their library fines (because we had some lost books, that were later found under and behind the bunkbeds.I'm not talking about fines I incur because I didn't get us there.), and then they can do as they see fit.  But they have to have a written plan for their money, not just money burning a hole in their pocket that they spend on the first thing they see.


Twin boys (2/05) and little sister (10/07)
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#26 of 38 Old 10-15-2011, 08:26 PM
 
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Like TiredX2, we see allowance as an opportunity to learn how to handle money, not for chores.  Our elementary age kids (11, 10 and 7) get $2 a week.  The local Credit Union comes to the school, and they decide for themselves how much to put in the bank account and how much to spend.  If the older two want extra money, they work on their businesses (both are young entrepreneurs, and I am so proud of them).  The only time I offer money for chores is if it is something way beyond expected.  Like, this summer my 11 year old DS mowed an acre with a push mower for me when DS and I were working too much to keep up (I'm so glad the rest of our property is field and woods!).  That was a big deal, so I did pay him.


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#27 of 38 Old 10-16-2011, 06:36 AM
 
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My son just turned 5 last month and my husband and I have been discussing doing an allowance. We have been considering $1 a week and he will only receive it if he has behaved for the week, not given us any trouble with his chores. He will earn more if he has behaved extremely well, thought of others before himself, etc. We're trying to figure out the ratio of putting his $ into savings while also giving him spending $. Any ideas would be great! <3


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#28 of 38 Old 10-16-2011, 09:20 AM
 
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We tried a non-money reward system with our almost 4 year old and it didn't work. He didn't really get the concept of "dollarz" and he doesn't really understand about real money either.

 

 

We do expect him to do chores and we'll give him tangible rewards for really great behavior. 

When he's older we might do an allowance for extra chores or for asking to mow the lawn, things like that, but we believe that he's responsible for age appropriate chores and daily jobs around the home because he's a member of our family. I want him to understand how to manage money, but I think he's not mature enough (and might not be mature enough for a while) for that. I want to get him a kiddie checking account (with the stamps in the deposit record, like I had) when he's just a little older. I think it can be fun for him, a great teachable moment and also a good time for one-on-one time with a parent since he'll be the oldest of 3 soon. Also, MIL works at a bank and I am sure it would be a fun thing to do for a grandparent day out also.

 

Do they still have those little bank books with fun stamps? I think mine were dinosaurs with the monitary amount in a box so we could keep track. Maybe they do it with little kiddie check cards now, lol, who knows!

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#29 of 38 Old 10-17-2011, 07:18 AM
 
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Great thread - newcomer here, I spend more time in Montessori forum.  I have a 3 yo with no allowance so I'm eager to see the responses so I can decide what I'll do.

 

At this point - but, I'm looking for other perspectives, I intend to start an allowance at the age of 5 (maybe 4) depending on her awareness of the concept of money.  Small enough so it covers her basics (I'll explain what I mean by basics in next paragraph), but enough so after basics, there is incentive to save or result from squandering.

 

We started with the concept of money when she was 2.  Ever since she could walk, when we went to the local food co-op , I put a dollar in her woven shopping basket and if she wanted a banana (her favorite treat at the store), she was expected to go to the counter herself and buy her own banana (and then eat it as we were shopping).  The workers at the store love her - they know it's Sunday afternoon when Lindsey is at the counter with a dollar to buy her banana.  They know her by name, and don't know my name.

 

She's 3 - I give her the dollar in the car before we even go in the store.  No big deal.  But, she understands the concept that you must have money to buy something.  In fact, there are times where I didn't have enough cash, she could only get her banana, but not anything else until we were done shopping and I bought everything with debit card (another lesson in 10 years *ha*).

 

I look forward to the day where I can say:  Lindsey, this is your allowance (given the day BEFORE shopping, to associate allowance = shopping)- you can use it to buy your special items.  If you want your banana treat, or a toy - you will buy it.  I'm envisioning her excitement at going to her "money box" and getting a dollar so she can buy her own banana, and then being able to put the change back in her box, rather than me pocketing it.

 

Personally, I won't tie chores to money (except as a penalty, where she must pay for me doing her chores) - As a participant of the household, my daughter will be expected to do chores.  As a participant of the household, an allowance is her bounty of the household budget.  She will do her chores - I have enough logical forcing mechanisms - no TV until everything is picked up, we will eat after we put away dishes, time for bed after things are put away.  Or, a la Loving Logic, I'll be happy to charge her to put her toys away (obviously associating it close enough in time so that my putting her toys away on Saturday night means she doesn't have enough money for a banana on Sunday shopping).  Granted, we may have a miserable day at the store (including leaving a half-full cart) if I explain that she spent her money by paying me to put away her toys the previous night.

 

Any thoughts or comments - I really hope that the requirement for chores, household maintenance is part of being a participant of the house.  Allowance is part of the bounty of the household - it is enough to pay for basics each week (for us, maybe it's just a banana at age 4) and save the change for extras like a toy (off cycle from Christmas or birthday).  If she doesn't want to do her chores, she can pay me (recognizing the impact within 48 hours - even if we don't need to get food, I go will shopping within 48 hours so she can face the consequences - trust me, before shopping when we go to look for a dollar, she'll have hint that she's "broke") - and I fully expect that day when she says:  I want my banana - do you have your dollar - no - why not - i gave it to you to put away my  toys - sorry, no banana.

 

Screaming fit - we will leave the store with an apologetic smile to people there explaining that this is a lesson. I'll probably notify the staff in the store in advance that at times I may leave the cart with a screaming child who didn't have enough money for a banana.

 

Following week, if she decides she doesn't want to put away her toys, I'll ask her - do you want to pay me a dollar to put away your toys?  Remember, if you give me your dollar, you cannot get a banana (a ritual since she was about 18 months old).

 

I see this as increasing in amount - to and from.  I'll charge her the "banana dollar" to put away her toys or $5 to clean her room - in essence, her charge/penalty will closely equal the weekly amount.  I'm also not adverse to saying:  You don't want to put it away?  That's fine - I will - I don't want it and I'll put it in the trash.

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#30 of 38 Old 10-17-2011, 07:51 AM
 
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No allowance for chores.

Chores are part of everyone's life. Everyone who lives in my house pitches in except the cat. My breadwinning dh does his share, too. Having a tidy home means we can relax better and invite folks over whenever we want. No one gets out of some routine chores unless they are sick in bed.


The allowance is to learn to spend or save. My kids have done both at different times. Sometimes they save up for an Ipod or a skateboard.. other times they buy silly stuff till their pockets are empty. But that's all in learning to manage money.


I have a friend who gets all the parenting stuff "wrong". She tied allowance to chores and her kid within a couple of weeks flat out refused to do chores anymore. He didn't like emptying the cat box and cleaning his room for a mere 10 bucks a week. Things got pretty ugly at their house until she back-pedaled and started over.
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