skulls crossbones and rock chics - Page 2 - Mothering Forums
1  2
The Childhood Years > skulls crossbones and rock chics
ollyoxenfree's Avatar ollyoxenfree 06:17 AM 07-29-2012

I have a bigger problem with obvious labels for designer brands than I do with "rocker chic" or goth or punk clothes. Both my kids have gone through a phase of wearing punk, but it was after they hit their teens. I don't recall any skull and crossbones, which sounds like little kids playing pirates actually. Maybe Keith Richards in Pirates of the Caribbean?  DS had 12 inch liberty spikes when he went to high school prom. Dd has a style completely all her own - a mad mix of vintage, ethnic and punk. Her favourite footwear last year was a pair of white cowboy boots. Lately she's had a rockabilly look with rolled up denims and vintage blouses.  I am so happy that she's confident enough to express her own style (which may include ripped up black stockings and "rocker chick" elements) rather than needing to walk out of the house every day in a catalogue-perfect, neatly pressed and perfectly co-ordinated designer outfit. 

 

I've always been grateful that they didn't want the pricey Hollister and Abercrombie & Fitch and even pricier designer labels that so many other kids demanded from a very young age. If the choice was between a skull and crossbones t-shirt and a Ralph Lauren polo, I know which one I'd prefer they liked. 

 

Having said all that, DS is now working part-time at a somewhat upscale shop at the mall, and I see his style changing to more designer wear. 

 

Love those shoes, btw! 



meemee's Avatar meemee 08:21 AM 07-29-2012
Quote:
Originally Posted by momma2beaugirls View Post

I've heard lots of stories about how girls went from the pink phase obsession immediately to the darker "rock and skull" phase. Like one day they woke up and decided it was too babyish so they decided to go to the other extreme. I see lots of that skull and guitar clothing in 4-6x sizes displayed right next to the disney princess stuff! 

you know i see this as normal. that size clothing are for kids what 3 to 4 years old? that is when kids are becoming aware of the world around them and start aping their parents AND developing their own style. remember the funky outfits they wear? three or 4 shirts on, shorts over long pants? a frilly dressy outfit with cowboy boots? so if their parents are into the GD culture its natural the children will gravitate to those kinda stuff. however personally this irks me. because its another merchandise issue. its once more companies want to make money and they take a chance with GD. and suddenly something that was off the beaten path is suddenly brought into the mainstream path - as a fashion statement totally ignoring the meaning behind that culture. 

 

when dd was 4 years old and we lived in the arty area of the city, she was so attracted to the Day of the Dead art and sculpture from Mexico that I ended up getting her a small one of a skeleton band. also by that age dd had gone from loving pink and purple to black - a colour she hated before. why? because her dad loves black. 

 

what i would have loved to see at that age for kids are those tattoo shirts. you know the kind with nude sleeves with tattoo designs on them as if you had tattoos on you. my dd loved, loved, loved this friend of mine who was tattoed all over. everytime she got a marker that is what she would do all over her body. waaay too cute. however unfortunately tattoing is also become pop culture - fashionable. fully losing the meaning behind why one has tatooes. however that is a whole 'nother chapter. but my aim to show you why i would get a shirt like that if there was one available in her size. probably would save me all that scrubbing time. 


JollyGG's Avatar JollyGG 11:24 AM 07-29-2012

My daughter is 6 and into the rocker chick and skulls look. I'm not a big fan of the princesses thing. Thankfully she's never really been that into them. I think my issues has to do with the fact that disney princesses are passive. Say what you will about her current style it's not passive.

 

She's gone through stages. One summer it was all dresses, the very next it had to come from the boys section of the store or she wasn't wearing it. This summer it can't be boy, but it can't be a dress or overly girly either. She's going for a sporty, rocker chick, surfer girl thing. She's slowly finding her own style and that's okay. I just roll with it.


lena1928's Avatar lena1928 01:58 PM 07-29-2012

My daughter is only 1.5-years-old, so right now I'm totally in control of everything she wears for the time being.  But, I have had a huge hand in helping raise my now-teenaged niece, and I have to keep a certain phrase in mind.  This is something that my own mother says: "I don't have to like it; I just have to approve of it."  So sometimes I just need to step back and ask myself it it's really something I view as inappropriate, or it it's just my personal distaste causing the issue.  I certainly don't like the way she dresses most of the time, and I would prefer her to have a complete change of wardrobe, but she's usually modest, which is my biggest concern, so I just have to bite my negative comments and disapproval and let her wear what she wants. 


pinklucy's Avatar pinklucy 02:56 PM 07-29-2012

I don't have a daughter but freedom of choice when it comes to clothing has always been important to me so it feels important that I give my son the same freedom. He wore skirts and dresses for 2 and a half years and currently favours smart suits complete with a waistcoat and tie in between wearing leggings and t-shirts. For years he only wore fancy dress which ranged from superman to Dorothy from the wizard of Oz to lion costumes and a pumpkin suit! I've always enjoyed what he comes up with.

 

Despite this I am aware that my own preferences do come into play. Personally I love a goth/punk style and when he was young I enjoyed dressing him in alternative type clothing sometimes. However, the day he chose a pair of shorts with an England football motif I really struggled. That kind of football culture has negative connotations for me. However, a lot of people would feel uncomfortable with a boy in a dress but that didn't bother me at all! The only thing I haven't let him do is shave his head which is only down to my own prejudice as I associate boys with shaved heads with thuggishness. It's my own issue but I don't want to have a negative thought when I look at him! As he gets older though I wouldn't stop him even if he did choose a style I really disliked


1  2

Up