Pajamas without flame resistant chemicals? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 15 Old 11-30-2012, 09:51 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Anyone have any idea where to get girls pajama pants without flame resistant chemicals on them?

 

I know that technically, all kids jammies have to have that stuff on them.  But, I remember reading that if it's called "lounge wear" it doesn't.  I found some flannel pants at JCPenny last year and they have them again this year but, they have writing across the bottom which I seriously hate.  So, Pennys is out.  

 

Has anyone see any lounge wear or flannel pants that don't have flame resistant stuff on them? 

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#2 of 15 Old 11-30-2012, 10:10 AM
 
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I buy cotton snug fit pajamas - i usually buy resale and my favorite brands are hanna andersson and gymboree. I've also seen carters, target brand, justice, costco and a few others out there. Not sure about the flannel.

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#3 of 15 Old 11-30-2012, 10:23 AM - Thread Starter
 
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My girls are 9 & 10 so they don't love the snug fit Jammie's anymore greensad.gif. They want more of a lounge / sleep pant.

They are in between kids and juniors so everything that fits them still has the flame resistant stuff.
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#4 of 15 Old 12-21-2012, 12:07 AM
 
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The brand Carters NEVER uses flame retardants in their clothing. You can buy it most anywhere.
 


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#5 of 15 Old 12-21-2012, 06:26 AM
 
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I'd just look for knit pants like light weight (or whatever weight you want) sweat pants. As long as they aren't labeled pjs, they shouldn't be treated.

 

If your girls really like the style of flannel pajama pants, they are pretty easy to sew. You might know someone who could sew them for you if you don't sew or have a machine. The girls would probably have a blast picking out fabric. They might even be able to sew them with a little help.


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#6 of 15 Old 12-28-2012, 02:23 AM
 
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Maybe this is out of your price range but here in Europe, toxic flame-retardants are not put in clothing. So you could order something from, say, Britain, and have it shipped overseas. But that would be expensive and there is a limit for customs as well so you'd have to only order a couple things at a time.

 

Other than that and asking here, I would just google this one, I am certain there are loads and loads of brands that don't use those chemicals (of course also the more eco-oriented clothes, maybe search for organic clothing). There is a British brand, Boden (their kids range is Mini Boden http://www.bodenusa.com/en-US/Mini-Boden-Clothing.html#nav) and I should think since their clothes are made for the UK primarily that they aren't using flame-retardants. You'd have to ask them though. Hanna Andersen is another European brand, not sure where they're produced but perhaps they too don't use toxic chemicals because like I said they are banned in the EU.

And then there's the Öko-Tex seal. Looks like this:

 

  +the Wikipedia page here for more info: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oeko-tex_standard. No flame-retardants used if it has that seal. Not sure how easy it is to find clothes with that in the US (again: google to find brands and shops) but here in Germany they're all over and often cheap too!

 

Good luck!


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#7 of 15 Old 12-28-2012, 12:53 PM
 
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Amberskyfire - Actually, if you check their website, Carter's PJ's ARE flame retardant: http://www.carters.com/carters/2-Piece-Fleece-Pjs/VM_377-437,default,pd.html?dwvar_VM__377-437_color=Multi&start=

 

 

It can be difficult but not impossible to find non-flame retardant PJ's for kids. Because of requirements California has about flame retardants being present in children's clothing (there is a great article about it here: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/03/06/toxic-flame-retardants-children-products_n_1324412.html  ), you have to read labels to make sure the clothing you are buying is free of the chemicals.

 

Generally, tight-fitting cotton PJ's are going to be free of flame retardants, but CHECK THE LABELS FIRST. Loose PJ's of any sort will almost always have flame retarding chemicals on them.

 

You can sew your own, but check the labels of the fabric you buy, as even bulk fabric that says it is intended for sleepwear is also often treated. I buy those labelled "not intended for sleepwear" because ...it doesn't have the flame retardant chemicals...since fabrics intended for sleepwear must contain flame retardant chemicals due to California's laws.

 

OR you can order from overseas, where the laws are completely different.

 

OR you can buy what you like and try to wash the chemicals out. I have heard that using dishsoap instead of laundry detergent will break down the flame retardant chemicals, but I don't know for sure how many washes that would take.

 

OR you can try the second-hand stores where the PJs have presumably been washed several times already.

 

Good luck, and let us know if you find a good manufacturer out there! I have been looking for 6+ years now, to no avail.
 


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#8 of 15 Old 12-28-2012, 01:27 PM
 
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When my son was young, ALL pajamas were flame resistant. I'd be happily surprised if that's changed. We just use underwear -- thermals for the cold months, boxers and undershirts for the rest. Those things are not flame resistant.
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#9 of 15 Old 12-29-2012, 10:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Blue Lotus View Post

Amberskyfire - Actually, if you check their website, Carter's PJ's ARE flame retardant: http://www.carters.com/carters/2-Piece-Fleece-Pjs/VM_377-437,default,pd.html?dwvar_VM__377-437_color=Multi&start=

 

 

Carter's makes cotton PJs which have no flame retardants in them. They are not loose fitting, though. They also make polyester pajamas which are flame resistant. They do not contain flame retardants.

 

There is a myth that has been spread in the natural living community that polyester contains fire retardants in its makeup. This is absolutely not true. Polyester is inherently flame retardant, not because it contains flame retardant chemicals that have been added but because the nature of the plastic's mollecular makeup is not conducive to combustion. Polyester is still plastic, so I don't like putting it on my kiddos, but Carter's is absolutely flame-retardant chemical free. :)

 

Edit: actually, I should correct that to make it not-so-much a blanket statement. Some polyester fabrics can be made with halogenated fire retardants in them, but these are usually used in furniture, thermoset resins used in industrial polymers, etc.


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#10 of 15 Old 12-29-2012, 03:18 PM
 
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Oh yeah, I remember hearing that that's why some manufactureres make PJs so tight fitting, because they are more naturally flame-resistant. Not sure if that always equates to not using chemicals in them, but I do know Gap make some super-cute tight-fitting PJs.

 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by amberskyfire View Post


There is a myth that has been spread in the natural living community that polyester contains fire retardants in its makeup. This is absolutely not true. Polyester is inherently flame retardant, not because it contains flame retardant chemicals that have been added but because the nature of the plastic's mollecular makeup is not conducive to combustion. Polyester is still plastic, so I don't like putting it on my kiddos, but Carter's is absolutely flame-retardant chemical free. :)

 

 

 

As for this statement about polyester, I remember hearing a story once, the kind of story you never forget, about a kid whose polyester PJs caught fire and they literally melted onto his skin. It kinda makes sense, but I have no idea if this is true but I can imagine that would happen if they really caught fire. So, yeah I wouldn't take polyester as a viable option. Not to mention it's not breathable and my kid sweats like a hog in his sleep sometimes so we'd never use polyester for sleepwear anyhow....


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#11 of 15 Old 12-29-2012, 05:12 PM
 
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Flannel PJ bottoms are just about the easiest thing in the world to make.  You can buy flannel on sale for $1.99 yard most of the time and for bigger kids to adult, it takes about 1.5-2 yards.  It is SERIOUSLY easy.  I can make them by myself and I am pretty sewing deficient.  

 

Flannel by the yard is not sprayed and specifically says 'not suitable for sleepwear'.  That way you can pick out whatever style your kids like and the fabric too!  

 

Good luck!


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#12 of 15 Old 12-29-2012, 05:21 PM
 
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Things other than clothing sold as PJs can be worn as PJs. I've bought long johns, t-shirts and sweatpants, and all sorts of things as PJs for my kids.
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#13 of 15 Old 12-29-2012, 08:40 PM
 
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I know it doesn't answer the OP's original question, but I thought I would post a link to a short video of a flame test between standard polyester fabric and a polyester fabric that had a chemical added during the manufacturing process of the fibre to be inherently flame resistant:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeNOy3w76Wk

 

Personally, I don't like polyester sleepwear as it is hot and doesn't breathe. Plus it burns and melts at the same time. Whether it has chemicals added during the making of the fibre, weaving, or after the fabric is made is less relevant to me, as it is a man-made fabric. While there may be some polyester fabrics that are inherently fire resistant, the fact that Carter's doesn't advertize loudly that their polyester fabrics used for sleepwear have NO chemicals added to the polymer matrix either molecularly (as the above fabric does in the video - it is permanently flame resistant), or through a process in the finishing of the fabric, tells me that they use polyester fabrics that have *something* added.

 

For *my* family, I choose cotton or other natural fabrics that have not been treated for flame resistance or retardance. I really didn't (and don't) want to get into a huge discussion about flame retardance vs. resistance, vs treatments of various fabrics here, as it really didn't discuss the OP's original question. Since her DC are beyond the age that Carter's, Inc. typically fits (I believe they go up to age/size 7), maybe some other brand suggestions would be helpful?

 

This isn't meant to be snotty or sharp; I am tired, my kids are bickering behind me and need to go to bed, and it feels like 120 degrees due to the wood stove. Since I work with fabrics (including those with flame retardants) professionally, I tend to look closely at what a manufacturer says or *doesn't* say about their fabrics, since there are often loopholes they can take advantage of.

 

OP - if you can sew, or find comfy cotton clothes labelled "not intended for sleepwear", those might be your best bets.

 

ETA: Here is another link to a fire retardant polyester fabric manufacturer that talks about the processes they use to make the fibers inherently fire resistant: http://www.libolon.com/flame-retardant-polyester-1.html  


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#14 of 15 Old 12-30-2012, 11:30 AM
 
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Originally Posted by P.J. View Post

Oh yeah, I remember hearing that that's why some manufactureres make PJs so tight fitting, because they are more naturally flame-resistant. Not sure if that always equates to not using chemicals in them, but I do know Gap make some super-cute tight-fitting PJs.

 

 

 

As for this statement about polyester, I remember hearing a story once, the kind of story you never forget, about a kid whose polyester PJs caught fire and they literally melted onto his skin. It kinda makes sense, but I have no idea if this is true but I can imagine that would happen if they really caught fire. So, yeah I wouldn't take polyester as a viable option. Not to mention it's not breathable and my kid sweats like a hog in his sleep sometimes so we'd never use polyester for sleepwear anyhow....

 

Yeah, polyester doesn't burn, but it will melt and shrink. But that's better' at least, than the entire child going up in flames. Still, scary. But then again, if your house is burning down around your ears, you probably have bigger issues and getting the child out is more important than worrying about a burn in the moment. Also, some families need warm jammies in winter, but can't afford wool.

 

Yes, tight-fitting cotton is good because there is no air behind the cotton when it is pressed against the skin. This makes it more difficult for it to catch fire. Wool is also fantastic (though expensive and not great for warmer weather) because it is also naturally flame-resistant.


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#15 of 15 Old 12-30-2012, 11:41 AM
 
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I know it doesn't answer the OP's original question, but I thought I would post a link to a short video of a flame test between standard polyester fabric and a polyester fabric that had a chemical added during the manufacturing process of the fibre to be inherently flame resistant:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OeNOy3w76Wk

 

Personally, I don't like polyester sleepwear as it is hot and doesn't breathe. Plus it burns and melts at the same time. Whether it has chemicals added during the making of the fibre, weaving, or after the fabric is made is less relevant to me, as it is a man-made fabric. While there may be some polyester fabrics that are inherently fire resistant, the fact that Carter's doesn't advertize loudly that their polyester fabrics used for sleepwear have NO chemicals added to the polymer matrix either molecularly (as the above fabric does in the video - it is permanently flame resistant), or through a process in the finishing of the fabric, tells me that they use polyester fabrics that have *something* added.

 

For *my* family, I choose cotton or other natural fabrics that have not been treated for flame resistance or retardance. I really didn't (and don't) want to get into a huge discussion about flame retardance vs. resistance, vs treatments of various fabrics here, as it really didn't discuss the OP's original question. Since her DC are beyond the age that Carter's, Inc. typically fits (I believe they go up to age/size 7), maybe some other brand suggestions would be helpful?

 

This isn't meant to be snotty or sharp; I am tired, my kids are bickering behind me and need to go to bed, and it feels like 120 degrees due to the wood stove. Since I work with fabrics (including those with flame retardants) professionally, I tend to look closely at what a manufacturer says or *doesn't* say about their fabrics, since there are often loopholes they can take advantage of.

 

OP - if you can sew, or find comfy cotton clothes labelled "not intended for sleepwear", those might be your best bets.

 

ETA: Here is another link to a fire retardant polyester fabric manufacturer that talks about the processes they use to make the fibers inherently fire resistant: http://www.libolon.com/flame-retardant-polyester-1.html  

 

 

Yes, that info is correct. It should be noted, however, that the flame retardants are mollecularly bonded in the fabric. It is part of the mollecular structure and it is stable. Of course anyone who understands basic chemistry knows that means that there is no possible way for anything to come out of the fabric. Unless, perhaps, it is burned. But if your child is on fire, you have much bigger issues to worry about than a tiny amount of phosphorus-based flame retardant.

 

Also, don't forget, if you are trying to do away with flame retardants in your child's sleepwear, you should do what you can to get them out of your house entirely. Flame retardants in sleepwear are a drop in the pond compared to an entire home. You have far larger amounts of carcinogenic flame retardants in all of your electronics, in your mattress, sometimes in pillows, in your carpet and underlying foam cushioning and in your furniture, not to mention your car and child's car seat are chock full of it.

 

We made sure our home has absolutely no carpeting, we use very few electronics (we do have a laptop) and we can only afford a regular mattress, no organic wool mattress, so that's a huge amount of flame retardants right there for us. :( We at least were able to choose wicker outdoor furniture, so there is no flame retardant in our living room stuff. The main danger of the chemicals is breathing in the dust, so be sure to wipe everything in your home down regularly with a wet rag. Sadly, there is no choice with cars or car seats. :(


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