How to fight with the monsters living inside my child 's play house ? - Mothering Forums

Forum Jump: 
 
Thread Tools
#1 of 7 Old 03-25-2014, 10:56 PM - Thread Starter
 
MildredPera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
My kid is studying at her Junior kindergarten . She fears that there is a monster living inside her play house which comes to attack her at night when she sleeps . She has vivid imaginations . I think this would be the after effect of her dadda 's bed time stories . Now days she wakes up and cries at night . How can get her out of this fear ?

Last edited by pokeyac; 06-26-2014 at 04:02 PM.
MildredPera is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
#2 of 7 Old 03-25-2014, 11:27 PM
 
LTurtle's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Location: Pacific NW
Posts: 205
Mentioned: 8 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 9 Post(s)
When my DD was little and scared of monsters, having nightmares, we gave her a "magic stone". It was a large quartz crystal, we put it under her bed and told her it would keep the monsters away. Every once in a while we put it in the sun to "recharge". Telling her there weren't any monsters didn't help, but the magic rock did. After a few months she wasn't afraid anymore.

Me treehugger.gif + DH reading.gif= DD faint.gif (1/2004) & DS babyf.gif (6/2013)
homeschool.gifnovaxnocirc.gifbfinfant.giffemalesling.GIFfamilybed1.gifwaterbirth.jpg
LTurtle is online now  
#3 of 7 Old 03-26-2014, 09:27 AM
 
SweetSilver's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Location: Westfarthing
Posts: 5,261
Mentioned: 6 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 84 Post(s)

Even though kids might not be reassured that monsters like that do not exist, I still feel like it is an essential place to start.  Kids need to hear that these monsters come from their imaginations, and little kids have big imaginations (and unsophisticated ability to understand the difference between real and the imagined.)  

 

But I agree that "knowing" this will not make the monster go away.  But I would make sure *she* is the authority on this monster, not me (though I can help her think of things to make it less scary).  

 

That's going to give the child power, being the authority.  

 

Is *her* monster a boy or a girl?  What does she look like?  Can you draw a picture of your monster so I can see it?  What does she think her monster wants?  Is she hungry?  Does she want a bedtime snack?  Is she afraid of the dark?  Does she want a snuggly blanket and a lovey to keep her company?  Is she bored in the playhouse all night with no toys?  If we give her some toys, would that be OK?  Which toys?  Oh, no toys, she's a mean monster and wants to eat you up?  

 

(At this point I would repeat that this is her big imagination and one day when she's a little bigger she will learn to recognize the difference, but then....)  

 

Would it make you feel better to set up a guard?  Which toys are the best guards?  OK, now do you want some on your bed or around the house?  I always liked some extra company in my bed when I was little, and I liked the door  cracked so some light would come in, would you like that?  When you feel better the monster seems less scary and will probably even disappear.

 

"Here's a flashlight on your table, and let me and daddy know if you want any more help."

 

If you are sure this is made worse by bedtime stories, I suggest nixing those kinds of books.  The imaginations of kids this age are hyper-active, and their ability to be reassured about what is real and what is imaginary is weak.  Wait until she has a better understanding before picking those books up again.  I found with my girls that when they started understanding their dreams were just dreams was a good indication that this skill had matured, though they still occasionally questioned.


"Let me see you stripped down to the bone. Let me hear you speaking just for me."
SweetSilver is online now  
#4 of 7 Old 03-26-2014, 09:35 PM
 
ThreeTwoFive's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 190
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

We have a book in Spanish (can't think of the title right now--will repost if I find it) where a boy is scared of a monster.  His father gives him a pencil to sleep with so he can draw a bowtie, funny ears, etc. on the monster to make it look silly.  

ThreeTwoFive is offline  
#5 of 7 Old 04-29-2014, 12:25 AM - Thread Starter
 
MildredPera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)

I searched in Google. But I couldn't find that book :(

MildredPera is offline  
#6 of 7 Old 04-29-2014, 12:31 AM - Thread Starter
 
MildredPera's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Posts: 8
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by ThreeTwoFive View Post
 

We have a book in Spanish (can't think of the title right now--will repost if I find it) where a boy is scared of a monster.  His father gives him a pencil to sleep with so he can draw a bowtie, funny ears, etc. on the monster to make it look silly.  

I searched in Google. But I couldn't find that book :(

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by SweetSilver View Post
 

Even though kids might not be reassured that monsters like that do not exist, I ****l feel like it is an essential place to start.  Kids need to hear that these monsters come from their imaginations, and little kids have big imaginations (and unsophisticated ability to understand the difference between real and the imagined.)  

 

But I agree that "knowing" this will not make the monster go away.  But I would make sure *she* is the authority on this monster, not me (though I can help her think of things to make it less scary).  

 

That's going to give the child power, being the authority.  

 

Is *her* monster a boy or a girl?  What does she look like?  Can you draw a picture of your monster so I can see it?  What does she think her monster wants?  Is she hungry?  Does she want a bedtime snack?  Is she afraid of the dark?  Does she want a snuggly blanket and a lovey to keep her company?  Is she bored in the playhouse all night with no toys?  If we give her some toys, would that be OK?  Which toys?  Oh, no toys, she's a mean monster and wants to eat you up?  

 

(At this point I would repeat that this is her big imagination and one day when she's a little bigger she will learn to recognize the difference, but then....)  

 

Would it make you feel better to set up a guard?  Which toys are the best guards?  OK, now do you want some on your bed or around the house?  I always liked some extra company in my bed when I was little, and I liked the door  cracked so some light would come in, would you like that?  When you feel better the monster seems less scary and will probably even disappear.

 

"Here's a flashlight on your table, and let me and daddy know if you want any more help."

 

If you are sure this is made worse by bedtime stories, I suggest nixing those kinds of books.  The imaginations of kids this age are hyper-active, and their ability to be reassured about what is real and what is imaginary is weak.  Wait until she has a better understanding before picking those books up again.  I found with my girls that when they started understanding their dreams were just dreams was a good indication that this skill had matured, though they ****l occasionally questioned.


I think her monster is more like an animal and ugly faced itseems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LTurtle View Post

When my DD was little and scared of monsters, having nightmares, we gave her a "magic stone". It was a large quartz crystal, we put it under her bed and told her it would keep the monsters away. Every once in a while we put it in the sun to "recharge". Telling her there weren't any monsters didn't help, but the magic rock did. After a few months she wasn't afraid anymore.


Ha..Ha...I like the idea of magic stone. :twothumbs Let me check...Hope it works!!!

MildredPera is offline  
#7 of 7 Old 05-01-2014, 10:49 AM
 
EnviroBecca's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: Pittsburgh, PA
Posts: 5,237
Mentioned: 3 Post(s)
Tagged: 0 Thread(s)
Quoted: 25 Post(s)

Another idea similar to the magic stone is a toy fierce creature who will defend your child.  My brother had a huge, hideous rubber spider for this purpose; it slept next to his pillow for years.  I have heard of other families keeping away monsters by spraying the room with water mixed with essential oils whose smell the parents claim is repulsive to monsters.  Depending on your daughter's personality, she might have more faith in an animal, magic, or "repellent".  Just make sure not to choose a type of animal that is scary to her.  A good question might be, "What is your monster afraid of?" or "What can hurt your monster?".


Mama to a boy EnviroKid treehugger.gif 9 years old and a new little girl EnviroBaby baby.gif!

I write about parenting, environment, cooking, and more. computergeek2.gif

EnviroBecca is online now  
Reply

User Tag List

Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page


Forum Jump: 

Posting Rules  
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are Off