Parents, do you think play influences in who preschoolers grow to become? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 11 Old 03-12-2015, 09:04 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Question Parents, do you think play influences in who preschoolers grow to become?

I am a college student, studying Human Development, researching about the question "Does Play Influence in Who Preschoolers Grow to Become?" Therefore, I d like to ask parents 12 questions about the topic.

1. Are you a father of a preschooler?
2. Are you a mother of a preschooler?
3. If you walked into your preschool son's classroom, to find him playing around in a pink princess dress, how would you react?
4. If you saw your son playing with baby dolls, as if he was taking care of it by feeding, bathing, diapering, putting it into bed, how would you react?
5. If you saw your daughter in her preschool classroom, playing with trucks, cars and tools, instead of dolls, how would you react?
6. Would you blame and become upset with the teachers?
7. Would you escort your child to play with toys that are specific to their gender roles?
8. Would you think your child would grow up to become feminine (if they're a boy), or masculine (if they're a girl), if they continued this behavior?
9. How do you feel about parents who raise gender neutral kids?
10. Do you consciously or unconsciously influence your children into stereotypically specific gender roles?
11. Do you generally feel positive or negative about gender neutral upbringings?
12. If you were educated to understand that whatever play your preschooler engages in, could influence or predict who they become in the future, would you be more cautious of what you allowed your children to play with?
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#2 of 11 Old 03-13-2015, 03:56 AM
 
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Um, have you run this project by your professor? The title and questions seem tome to combine to sound incredibly homophobic, and your basic assumptions about children and parents come across as very insulting, and your assumptions about gender are just weird.
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#3 of 11 Old 03-13-2015, 04:37 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Mary Sarkisyan View Post
I am a college student, studying Human Development, researching about the question "Does Play Influence in Who Preschoolers Grow to Become?" Therefore, I d like to ask parents 12 questions about the topic.

1. Are you a father of a preschooler?
2. Are you a mother of a preschooler?
3. If you walked into your preschool son's classroom, to find him playing around in a pink princess dress, how would you react?
4. If you saw your son playing with baby dolls, as if he was taking care of it by feeding, bathing, diapering, putting it into bed, how would you react?
5. If you saw your daughter in her preschool classroom, playing with trucks, cars and tools, instead of dolls, how would you react?
6. Would you blame and become upset with the teachers?
7. Would you escort your child to play with toys that are specific to their gender roles?
8. Would you think your child would grow up to become feminine (if they're a boy), or masculine (if they're a girl), if they continued this behavior?
9. How do you feel about parents who raise gender neutral kids?
10. Do you consciously or unconsciously influence your children into stereotypically specific gender roles?
11. Do you generally feel positive or negative about gender neutral upbringings?
12. If you were educated to understand that whatever play your preschooler engages in, could influence or predict who they become in the future, would you be more cautious of what you allowed your children to play with?
1. I'm the mother of a pre-school girl, and a boy in early elementary.
3. Photo op!
4. He'll be such a great dad one day.
5. She loves those at home too.
6. So... I've arrived at pre-school to find my child happily engaged in imaginative play. This is what I hoped for when I signed up for pre-school. I believe that girls with trucks and boys with baby dolls appeared on the brochure.
7. Screw up a good game in process and upset absolutely everyone? If I made a habit of that, I would expect the program director to tell me my family would be better served elsewhere. (Plus, what if my son is wearing a princess dress to do plumbing repairs on play kitchen? Or what if my daughter is riding to rescue her baby on the truck, armed with the hammer? This stuff is not always cleanly divided, which is fine.)
8. I would not be concerned about their gender expression as adults on the basis of this play, or much of anything else. My work as a parent is to help them be happy people, not squash them into stupid boxes.
9. What does "gender neutral kids" even mean?
10. I'm sure I do.
11. Again, I have no idea what you mean by "gender neutral upbringing" here.
12. I am somewhat careful about what my children play with, and how they play, because of things I want them to be when they grow up. I discourage play that's mean, that excludes other children, that's culturally insensitive, or seems not entirely consensual. If I believed that totally wrong thing that you're suggesting about play, I would still want my children to be true to themselves as long as they were kind, fair, and thoughtful.
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#4 of 11 Old 03-13-2015, 10:01 AM
 
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Children grow to become adults.
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#5 of 11 Old 03-14-2015, 10:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mary Sarkisyan View Post
I am a college student, studying Human Development, researching about the question "Does Play Influence in Who Preschoolers Grow to Become?" Therefore, I d like to ask parents 12 questions about the topic.

1. Are you a father of a preschooler?
2. Are you a mother of a preschooler?
3. If you walked into your preschool son's classroom, to find him playing around in a pink princess dress, how would you react?
4. If you saw your son playing with baby dolls, as if he was taking care of it by feeding, bathing, diapering, putting it into bed, how would you react?
5. If you saw your daughter in her preschool classroom, playing with trucks, cars and tools, instead of dolls, how would you react?
6. Would you blame and become upset with the teachers?
7. Would you escort your child to play with toys that are specific to their gender roles?
8. Would you think your child would grow up to become feminine (if they're a boy), or masculine (if they're a girl), if they continued this behavior?
9. How do you feel about parents who raise gender neutral kids?
10. Do you consciously or unconsciously influence your children into stereotypically specific gender roles?
11. Do you generally feel positive or negative about gender neutral upbringings?
12. If you were educated to understand that whatever play your preschooler engages in, could influence or predict who they become in the future, would you be more cautious of what you allowed your children to play with?
>Mother
>I don't have any son's, but as a ece caregiver for many years, I would find this very odd. I have never seen a young man choose that sort of play without prompting from an adult.
>I would very much expect that, caregiving is not a gender specific job. However, I would have to explain that he wont get to grow breasts and provide milk the way I do as an adult (at least based on the way my girls model me nursing).
>My girls play with cars just as much as dolls. These are not gender specific either because they are everyday things in their lives. They build little wooden toys all the time though. So, I wouldn't consider that playing, that is just a child hard at work
>*If* my children were in a daycare other than the learning center I run from my home and I had a son and walked in on him playing in a pink princess dress, I would assume it was due to teacher prompting and I would have a conversation with the teacher. That is pushing an agenda on a child and completely inappropriate no matter what the agenda. I am a christian and I would never suggest the kids I care for play specifically with our Noah's ark or other Bible themed trays. Let parents choose what values to instill in their kids. That is way too close to the line many socialist countries peddle about children belonging to the nation as a whole rather than individually being a part of a family unit. I will post a link about that: http://chaosforkisses.blogspot.com/2...overnment.html
>No, you never interrupt a child's play. It ruins their concentration and stops the learning happening in that moment. At a later date, I would just not offer it. If he honestly chose that. I don't have an issue in dress up. But, again children do not choose to play in a way that isn't modeled to them in their lives somehow.
>If he was continually prompted to visualize himself as a female, he would become more feminine. If he was not allowed to play with a kitchen or baby doll, then he may not be as comfortable with those tasks as an adult. But, I didn't grow up with a father and never saw anyone fixed things. But, I learned how to change my own oil and tires in college. It would only be bad if you specifically told a child that they could not do those things in real life (ie help in the kitchen or cuddle with baby sibling)
>When I first became a mother, I consciously tried to stay very gender-neutral. I like to tell the story of my oldest picking out her first pair of flip-flops at 1yo. I was drawn to the camo pair. They would not look as dirty when splashing through the mud and I like camo. But, as I was pointing to them she grabbed the purple and pink sparkly pair. It has been all princess and pomp ever since. And she is leading her two younger sisters in her ways, lol. I did consciously pull her out of dance class because I was frustrated to see the recital routine contain sexually subjective moves in a beginner class (not that it would matter, no girl needs to be taught that this is how to express her femininity. That is just insulting)
>I think it depends of the approach. If your approach is to push the opposite gender in the name of gay rights or sexualize girls in the name of woman's rights, I have a real problem with that. If you are just letting kids play with things that represent the real life around them, then that is just common sense (or it should be).
>I think my comments about dance class address this last question. However, I am not sure what you are looking for in this question. Are you saying if we "understood" that letting children play with "gender-neutral" toys makes them more well rounded, would we offer toys meant for the opposite gender? or, if we "understood" pushing kids toward specific toys would make them more likely to choose a gender identification, would we be less pushy?

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#6 of 11 Old 03-14-2015, 11:37 PM
 
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Why would you assume a teacher prompted a boy to put on a dress?

My boy isn't really in to princess dresses, but when he's gone there, it's been on rainy days when the crowd at daycare was mostly girls. The teachers got out the dressup box (an emergency measure for days when the playground is unusable, because dressup games tend to mean sharing around any head lice anyone might have), and the girls were having so much fun playing princess that the boys joined in. When he's at home with just me and his sister, a rainy day with the dressup box can go either way - DD might sell him on being a princess, or he might convince her to do his thing, whatever that is that day. DD has a strong personality, and has also charmed other boys at school into being princesses with her. Dressup boxes both at my house and daycare lean towards princess because we pulled the superhero capes due to flying accidents, and the props for doctors, cops and firemen tend to migrate to the construction and kitchen toy areas.
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#7 of 11 Old 03-14-2015, 11:39 PM
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Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post
Um, have you run this project by your professor? The title and questions seem tome to combine to sound incredibly homophobic, and your basic assumptions about children and parents come across as very insulting, and your assumptions about gender are just weird.
I think the point is to understand parents' perceptions regarding play and gender and it sounds like an Intro level class assignment so I doubt the students need to be "running the project by the professor".
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#8 of 11 Old 03-14-2015, 11:45 PM
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1. Are you a father of a preschooler? no
2. Are you a mother of a preschooler? yes
3. If you walked into your preschool son's classroom, to find him playing around in a pink princess dress, how would you react? say it was cute and take a picture if I hadn't taken one before of that
4. If you saw your son playing with baby dolls, as if he was taking care of it by feeding, bathing, diapering, putting it into bed, how would you react? Ask what he is doing for the baby, tell him he is a good dad.
5. If you saw your daughter in her preschool classroom, playing with trucks, cars and tools, instead of dolls, how would you react? Ask what the trucks/cars are doing, describe what I see ("I see you built a road.")
6. Would you blame and become upset with the teachers? No
7. Would you escort your child to play with toys that are specific to their gender roles? No
8. Would you think your child would grow up to become feminine (if they're a boy), or masculine (if they're a girl), if they continued this behavior? I would not make predictions about future behavior based on play at preschool level.
9. How do you feel about parents who raise gender neutral kids? Positively
10. Do you consciously or unconsciously influence your children into stereotypically specific gender roles? Possibly unconsciously, but I try to avoid it.
11. Do you generally feel positive or negative about gender neutral upbringings? Positive
12. If you were educated to understand that whatever play your preschooler engages in, could influence or predict who they become in the future, would you be more cautious of what you allowed your children to play with? Not related to gender/sexuality but if a type of play was strongly related to antisocial, violent or self-harming outcomes I might be cautious.
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#9 of 11 Old 03-14-2015, 11:58 PM
 
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Professors should be approachable for advice on project design at any level of instruction. There are both ethical and practical reasons for that. Intro-level projects aren't a magical no-ethics-needed zone, as anyone who suffered through a Mean Girl poll in junior high can tell you. Leaving that aside, there are serious practical problems with this project, which could lead to frustration and failure. Any project that involves surveying other people should involve either guidance or feedback about phrasing and posing those questions so that they result in meaningful data that can be analyzed.

Many universities require that researchers use tools that keep responses confidential. The kind of discussion going on among us right now contaminates response data, preventing some people from expressing their opinions at all, and heavily influencing what others say. Someone involved in teaching this course should have introduced this student to Survey Monkey.

This student at the very least needs to better define her terms, because two of her questions are unanswerable. This is also an issue that could be addressed by a conversation with a more experienced researcher.
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#10 of 11 Old 03-15-2015, 07:12 AM
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Originally Posted by MeepyCat View Post
Professors should be approachable for advice on project design at any level of instruction. There are both ethical and practical reasons for that. Intro-level projects aren't a magical no-ethics-needed zone, as anyone who suffered through a Mean Girl poll in junior high can tell you. Leaving that aside, there are serious practical problems with this project, which could lead to frustration and failure. Any project that involves surveying other people should involve either guidance or feedback about phrasing and posing those questions so that they result in meaningful data that can be analyzed.

Many universities require that researchers use tools that keep responses confidential. The kind of discussion going on among us right now contaminates response data, preventing some people from expressing their opinions at all, and heavily influencing what others say. Someone involved in teaching this course should have introduced this student to Survey Monkey.

This student at the very least needs to better define her terms, because two of her questions are unanswerable. This is also an issue that could be addressed by a conversation with a more experienced researcher.
As a researcher I understand how research works but this has an obvious community college intro 5 page paper feel to it (that, or trolling) and if it's for a paper it's probably due tomorrow. I think if you want to help her, help her. If you don't, don't. Asking people for input for your 5 page paper does not fall into the same category that requires IRB approval or input from the professor. You are taking this far too seriously and I can't figure out why. I can also predict based on your other posts that I will get an essay reply from you longer than the length of the OP's report arguing about this so I will just warn you in advance I'm not going to respond to that, I do not have time.
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#11 of 11 Old 03-15-2015, 07:16 AM
 
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So.... this reply of yours is just to be extra super sure I know you're rolling your eyes?
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