teaching my child to read - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 14 Old 01-24-2005, 10:45 AM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm looking for suggestions on books that I can read to help me teach my almost 4 year old how to read as well as suggested reading programs. She knows that the words in books are what I'm reading and gets so frustrated that she can read them too. She is starting to recognize letters (thank you bathtub letter toys!)

Last night we were using a pre-K workbook and I did OK when working through matching shapes, but when it came to explaining opposites (even though we read books based on opposites) and picking out words that sound alike I just didn't know how to explain it to her. I'm a chem major for a reason!!! I really would like to help her because I just love to read and I know what pleasures reading to can bring to a person.

Thanks for the help!

Michelle: wife to J, mom to M (2001), E (2003), C (2005), S (2007) and O! (2009) And someone new in 2011!
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#2 of 14 Old 01-24-2005, 01:08 PM
 
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You can ask in the homeschool forum. You'd probably get more advice there than here. I'm just following my child's lead. She is teaching herself how to read. When she asks for help, I'll help her and answer her questions, or spell a word for her, but it's all at her pace and her initiation. We read lots of books, we play word games and such all day long. But I refuse to take the fun out of it by making it like school!
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#3 of 14 Old 01-24-2005, 05:01 PM
 
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Once she knows the letter sounds, check out the Bob Books (bobbooks.com). Moderately slow introduction to reading
(not instruction-y) & very funny with simple line drawings.

mama to DS 9 and DD 5 and
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#4 of 14 Old 01-26-2005, 03:56 AM
 
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I don't have a specific series to recommend, but I think you're on the right track so far. DS (he's now 6..) started reading at 4. I read to him almost every night from birth, and we started with the letters of course...when he got to that frustrated point you're decribing, we focused on the sounds. He had a collection of Sesame Street alphabet books we got through a book club. We'd get 3 every few weeks. We'd just focus on the letter sounds (like the "M" book would talk about monkeys making music or something..) and he'd identify all the "M" words for me. THen we started with short words by memory like me, it, he etc..He also LOVED to read the titles of books for me. I'm sure some of it was memory, but he eventually sounded the words out. He'd then identify the words from the title inside the book, and we moved on from there. Once he "got it" we'd take turns with short books, alternating pages because I didn't want him to get tired of reading, or think it was a chore. He's an excellent reader now (which I LOVE because I love to read too!) He reads Magic Tree House and other chapter books by himself, but we still read something together every night.

It sounds like you're on the right track and your DD is interested in learning!
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#5 of 14 Old 01-26-2005, 11:21 AM
 
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I found with my oldest that there was a clear point in his developement that he was "ready" and at that point reading began to come as naturally as walking and breathing. Its hard to explain -- concepts that frustrated us both previously were suddenly easy to explain and comprehend. With him, the change happend when he was about 5.5 yo. Its probably different with all kids. But I'd say, just keep reading to him and working on letters and don't stress about teaching reading until he starts to teach himself -- and then at that point -- offer as much direction as he craves and is easily receptive to.
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#6 of 14 Old 01-28-2005, 03:12 AM
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This is my own reading program, but I've only tried it out on one kid so far! (in the process of trying it out on child #2.)


Beyond reading to your child, having lots of books in the home, your child seeing you read, etc. (the obvious stuff):


The whole language/vs. phonics debate perplexes me. To me it's obvious: teach whole language first, phonics later.

The *KEY* to learning how to read is the *CONFIDENCE* that one can read, and that reading is easy.

Thus, I recommend first teaching sight words (do a internet search for sight words and you'll come up with some great lists.) Basically, you are teaching your child to memorize these words, perhaps with flashcards. This really makes sense, though, when you think about it. The vast majority of what you and I read is memorized; only rarely do we need to sound out a word.

Also, children sometimes have a hard time understanding that the same letters in the same combination will always make the same word.....this concept is made easier by memorizing sight words, I think. Later, you can teach phonics (sounds, sound blends) as an attack skill when new words are encountered, but first of all your child will have the basic foundation of knowing a lot of sight words.

We also used the Reader Rabbit computer program and my dd liked that, as well.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#7 of 14 Old 01-28-2005, 12:28 PM
 
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Some kids pick up the phonics of words without any involvement from us. They somehow manage to figure it out on their own.

Whole language is like giving a child a house and say build. Phonics is more the steps to building a house.

With whole language often those memorized words are all the kid learns to read. Then they hit an unknown word and that is when the problem starts. Also they will hit similar looking words and problems can arise.

http://www.welltrainedmind.com/wholelanguage.php

Here is a link about various programs. I found Phonics Pathways a good helper for myself. I have not always had my child used the book but came up with ideas to teach what the book teaches. You can combine this with Bob Books.
http://www.welltrainedmind.com/reading.php

At this age rhyming is a fun game to help phonemic awareness.

http://www.nrrf.org/84_ltrs_phnmc_aware.html At the bottom of the link these are some games you can start doing with your child at various levels. Your child will not be able to do them all.

http://www.nrrf.org/satire_WL_at_Fork.html
http://www.nrrf.org/article_holten_4-6-04.htm
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#8 of 14 Old 01-29-2005, 03:56 PM
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Well, all I know is that my 7 year-old, whom I taught whole-language and then phonics, reads extremely well (grade levels ahead).

And her cousin, who is a year older, went through an expensive phonics-intensive reading program and strugged to read for a long time.


I'm not saying give up on phonics; I'm just saying teach phonics AFTER a whole-language program.

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#9 of 14 Old 01-29-2005, 05:11 PM
 
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Quote:
The whole language/vs. phonics debate perplexes me. To me it's obvious: teach whole language first, phonics later.
:LOL But for me, it would be exactly the opposite. DD knew a few sight words (names, stop, etc...) but once she could really grasp the idea of phonics she could read almost anything (well, she went from sounding out basic words to at least a 2nd grade reading level). Now, at six she can read basically anything, though her comfort level is more in the 4th grade level and she often reads much easier books to relax (like Magic Tree House & the like).

But for DS I don't know. I do know he's not ready. With DD there was a big gap between knowing all her letters, then (shortly after) knowing all the sounds, then (like a year later) putting words together, then (within a few months) reading well. DS knows his letters & knows some of the sounds they go with (or what words go with what letter & he is getting really good at rhyming) & he understands you read letters, but there is just not that "click" yet and we'll wait until there is (and he requests it after that--- he already wants to read, but I really don't think it's worth it to push it) that "click" so he can feel successful.

 

 

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#10 of 14 Old 01-29-2005, 05:18 PM
 
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I think that there are merrits to both whole language and phonics. My DD, who just turned four wants very much to read. She is an extremely auditory learner, which, I think puts her at a disadvantage when it comes to learning to read, because it is hard for her to recognize words by sight. She likes phonics because it gives her a "formula" to apply to the word in order to sound it out. She has a hard time with sight words and often doesn't recognize the same word she has just read. She is still quite young to be reading at all so I don't push her, reading will come in time when she is ready. As of now, she can read simple three letter words. Anyway, I think some kids respond to whole language and some to phonics, but most respond best to a mixture of both. We use Phonics Pathways and the Bob books and they have worked really well for us so far. Good luck and good reading!

Sarah, unschooling musician mama to Ella (12/24/00) , Aurora (1/31/04) and Hazel (1/30/07) (agenesis of the corpus colosum, large interhemispheric cyst, macrocephaly, shunt). homeschool.gif bfolderchild.gif familybed1.gifguitar.gif
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#11 of 14 Old 01-29-2005, 05:31 PM
 
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Anyway, I think some kids respond to whole language and some to phonics, but most respond best to a mixture of both.


Just wanted to clarify that I also think there is no "one way."

What worked for DD may very well not work for DS. And what works for DS may very well not work for your child!

 

 

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#12 of 14 Old 01-31-2005, 01:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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thanks for the ideas!

Michelle: wife to J, mom to M (2001), E (2003), C (2005), S (2007) and O! (2009) And someone new in 2011!
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#13 of 14 Old 01-31-2005, 01:47 AM
 
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We LOVE the Bob Books - used those to teach my DS to read before he enterered KG. They worked great for us and he is WAY ahead of his grade level now.

DD (4 years) has just finally shown an interest in learning about letters, sounds & also numbers. The Leap Frog Letter Factory Game, fridge magnets & video have been a HUGE motivator for her. Hoping that she'll be ready for Bob Books by summer.
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#14 of 14 Old 01-31-2005, 04:49 AM
 
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throwing in my 2 cents here for another POV

whole language is integrating reading across the curriculum
teaching reading using a variety of subject areas kids taught using whole language techniques use phonetic skills but they are generally not taught use direct instruction methods this depends on the school district & teacher training

i think some are confusing the look-say method of reading instruction here VS skills based direct approach
it is a generalization to say that method of whole instruction is look-say or sight and that whole language does not use phonics


IME
if you are teaching a child one on one you will want to use a balanced approach to literacy at the same time following their interests in selecting materials

You may want to find at your library-
'Teach a Child to Read With Children's Books'
by Mark B. Thogmartin, Ph.D. this has a balance and uses real books instead of things like the Bob books - there are so many wonderful repetitive predictable books out there that can teach & entertain your child, that will motivate them to want to read

The best book for a child to read can often be one they wrote themselves, look at book-making with your child as another source of material for your child to read. Reading Recovery uses these as VIP motivation.

A great book I reccomend to look at before buying anything is 'Honey for a Child's Heart' by Gladys M. Hunt

or back off and let the child discover reading on their own- thus---- answering ?S they ask to increase their spoken vocabulary, reading to them every day, modeling reading in front of your child, and providing a print rich environment

you may want to read some about Raymond Moore look for this book-
Better Late Than Early: A New Approach to Your Child's Education
if a child led gentle approach is appealing to you, he has lots of research supporting his theory
http://www.moorefoundation.com/When%...s%20Abuse.html


mom to ds16, 11, 7 and dd 5
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