Stuttering child--anyone else? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 09:53 PM - Thread Starter
 
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I'm ***HOPING*** this is just a phase or something, but in the past 3 weeks or so ds1 has began stuttering. It is always the first word of the sentence that he has trouble with. Poor thing, he just stammers sometimes to the point that he just gives up for a minute.

Example:

Trying to say, 'That bird is flying high'.

Comes out as, 'Da-da-da-da-da-da-da-dat bird is flying high'. (He doesn't have the 'th' consonant sound yet. The word 'that' is 'dat'.)

He is starting to get very frustrated at times and sometimes he stammers so much with that first sylable that he just gives up and stops for a minute and starts over.

This is especially agonizing because he had a minor speech delay secondary to a tight frenulum (requiring surgery at 20 months). He said very little until he was 2 and then took off like wildfire. His speech is age appropriate now, he is easy to understand and his vocabulary is large. Prior to 3 weeks ago, I'd never heard him ever stutter before. I don't think it has anything to do with nerves or the like. Nothing is new, it's just our same old routine.

I'd love to hear from others who have had children who have gone through a stuttering phase and have gone on not to stutter later. With our speech issues in the past, my tendency is to panic.

~lisa~mama to 3 boys (1/02, 5/04, 12/06)
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#2 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 09:59 PM
 
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My nephew was around 3 when he started to stutter, and that was about the time that I had started taking my Early Childhood Education classes which focused on development. Sometimes during language development, and particularly more with boys, stuttering happens. It is usually a phase, and it happens because their vocabulary is growing so quickly that their brain is working faster than their mouth. My nephew stuttered for about 8 months, and it was more prominent when he was excited. Now, he rarely stutters.. he can go days without a stammer. If it continues and worries you too much, ask your Dr.

Jen - Mama to V (b. 2-18-09) and AJ (b. 10-9-11) Wife to DH

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#3 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 10:23 PM
 
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My son stutters pretty often too but hes 4 now, and it did not start until 4.. but he has articulation issues and his speech is clearly delayed.. he often sounds warbled when he talks sort of like underwater..most people do not understand what hes saying and they look to us to interpret it but sometimes we are not sure either! I am hoping time will help him.. the wait lists are very long for preschool speech stuff in our area.. and because we homeschool he would not be part of the stream for speech therapy by the schoolboard (maybe not a bad thing I think all kids develop at differing rates) however I think that he might get better as time goes on too.. its interesting to note that he was born with a very bad tounge tie it was corrected a few days after his birth but sometimes I wonder if it is something structural with his mouth .. I truly do not know! his stuttering is almost always when he is talking about himself " I I I I I I I I have this car" .. that kind of thing..

I have watched some of my other kids exhibit "non normative" speech patterns for their age and by the time they were 6 there was no difference between them and anyone else.. of course this is just my opinion but I would not worry to much and hes only 3.
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#4 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 10:34 PM
 
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my son had/has stuttering problems and has come so far. i know how hard it is to watch him struggle vocalizing his thoughts.

with ds, his stuttering was throughout the sentence. if i recall correctly, stuttering at only the beginning of a sentence is normal around age 3. i'll have to double check that though.

if you have any doubts, get him evaluated by a speech therapist. it sounds like you've been through this before though, so you already know that
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#5 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 10:36 PM
 
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Lisa, how old is ds?
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#6 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 11:02 PM
 
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My DS does the same thing. He's 4 and started stuttering and it seemed to get worse. Then it stopped for a little while and then started again. It comes and goes. I asked a few people who are speech therapists and they all have said that it sounds normal. It's his mind working fast and he's trying to get everything out. I made it a point to *not* let him know I notice the stuttering. I did not want him to get the idea that it was wrong or he was doing something wrong. He's a very sensitive little boy and he gets discouraged easily. I just patiently wait and let him work it out...and that can be very hard sometimes.

Most boys stutter at some point.
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#7 of 14 Old 05-02-2005, 11:03 PM
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I don't have personal experience, but my husband stuttered when he was a boy...around 9 or so I guess. At the time, his parents took him to someone who said it was because he was so excited about going on vacation he just spontaneously started stuttering and never stopped ...the 70's *sigh*

Anyway, according to him and my MIL, it was pretty bad for a couple of years, he had some speech therapy, then I guess he learned to speak a bit slower or his mouth caught up with his brain or something, but it almost completely went away...

He is now 35 and he does stutter occasionally, only when he is REALLY excited about something or is trying to get something important out fast...I think it is the absolute CUTEST thing in the whole world and it makes me want to just hug him so much!! I am sure people notice *occasionally* ---but again, only when he is REALLY excited or animated about something, and it isn't that bad even....my hubby doesn't get embarrassed about it at all...

Anyway, not to hijack, sorry! I just wanted you to know that it is probably okay, I would keep an eye (or ear) on it, and perhaps some speech therapy may be in order, just to learn to speak slower etc...until his mouth catches up to his brain!

Good luck and take care!
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#8 of 14 Old 05-03-2005, 12:46 AM
 
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My DS started stuttering at the beginning of his sentences when he turned 3. He was a late talker to begin with, and didn't really start to vocalize himself until he was about 2.5. He'll be four next month and his stuttering has gone down a lot. It was just like how you mentioned your son stutters. The first word in the sentence was very troublesome for him. Now, he does it only occasionally, and not nearly as many stutters. We always made it a point to just be very patient with him and not interrupt him, even though we knew what he was trying to say. I think your son will outgrow it, but I know how you feel, because I was so worried that it would progress and he would stutter into adulthood.
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#9 of 14 Old 05-03-2005, 07:49 AM
 
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I know someone else brought it up in this post, but I wanted to mention it again because it is important. Don't let your child know that their stuttering is "wrong." Don't try to coax the words out or be impatient during a stutter, we all know how we receptive they are. Be patient and it should fix itself.

Jen - Mama to V (b. 2-18-09) and AJ (b. 10-9-11) Wife to DH

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#10 of 14 Old 05-03-2005, 09:02 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Sorry, I forgot that I took the kids ages out of my sig.

Ds1 was 3 in January, so that makes him 3.25.

Thanks for the input so far and yes, I've never ever let on that I notice the stuttering. There have been a couple of times that when he has went on for a while, 'M-m-m-m-m-m-m-m-m-m-m', without ever getting out what he is trying to say, HE will laugh at himself (although I think it is more a laugh of frustration) and during those times I will acknowledge and say something like, 'Isn't it aggrevating when your words don't come out?'.

~lisa~mama to 3 boys (1/02, 5/04, 12/06)
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#11 of 14 Old 05-03-2005, 09:55 AM
 
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This age is very very typical for developing what is known as "developmental disfluency." It's often associated with a leap in development, not necessarily language. My friend's dd started with potty learning. As she mastered the potty, the stuttering increased significantly.

You've gotten some good tips here- patience & non-reaction are key. Some general guidelines to keep in mind are:
if he is stuttering more than 10% of the time
if it persists for more than 3-6 months

Here is a great site for more info. good luck!!
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#12 of 14 Old 05-04-2005, 10:28 PM
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My son stutters sometimes (or "blocks" as the speech therapist likes to call it.) The speech therapist said that it is probably because he hasn't established brain dominance yet, which sometimes doesn't occur until age 7. (Hasn't decided whether to be right-brained or left-brained, and I can really see that.)

Ds goes to speech therapy once a week now, for the stuttering and because he's not saying consonants as clearly as he should. He likes going, so I figure it can't do any harm and might do him some good! ( I hope.)

Dh and I tend to talk fast--and perhaps ds has subconsciously decided that he has to talk fast, too. So, we've made a conscious effort to slow down OUR speech a little, so he doesn't feel rushed when he is talking. Also, don't ever interrupt your son or try to finish his sentences for him. Show him with body language that you are listening.

My son is almost 3 and has been stuttering for about 4 months now.

PS. The fact that your son is sometimes self-conscious about it is another reason to help him out of it (through therapy.)

"Our task is not to see the future, but to enable it."
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#13 of 14 Old 05-20-2005, 12:23 PM
 
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My ds is near 3 and just started stuttering on the first word of a sentence, using beginning with, "I....." It was pronounced and had a rapid onset, just kind of started one day recently.

I noticed the little boy who lives behind us did the same thing around the same age, but no longer stutters. So, dw and I just assumed it was normal developmental phenomenon due to a rapidly increasing vocabulary and brain activity but a slower ability to express the thoughts.

So, we do not bring attention to it at all. We expect him to outgrow it.
But, I was concerned enough to need to check out this thread to see what other's experiences were/are. Thanks all.
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#14 of 14 Old 05-20-2005, 01:18 PM
 
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:

Dd went through the same thing, as did several other children in her daycare classroom. It ended up being a very brief phase, but I talked with her daycare teacher and she said it was completely normal for the aforementioned reasons, and to not make an issue out of it.

I don't know what the 'normal' length of time is to wait it out, but I wouldn't worry just yet!

~ Meredith, mom to dd(Jan '02), ds1(May '04) and ds2 (June '07) ~ :
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