Any experiences with Pediasure? - Mothering Forums

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#1 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 12:17 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Hi,

DD is almost 4 and is very small for her size (40" & 30lbs). It has been suggested (from well meanng family members) that I give her Pediasure to help her increase her weight. My nieces and nephew were also very slight and their moms gave them Pediasure for almost 1 yr. Now they are tall and of a healthy build.

I know that I should talk to my dr about this but I want to know what other moms think, especially if you have experiences with Pediasure.

Thank you

M
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#2 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 01:41 AM
 
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Hi,

DD is almost 4 and is very small for her size (40" & 30lbs). It has been suggested (from well meanng family members) that I give her Pediasure to help her increase her weight. My nieces and nephew were also very slight and their moms gave them Pediasure for almost 1 yr. Now they are tall and of a healthy build.

I know that I should talk to my dr about this but I want to know what other moms think, especially if you have experiences with Pediasure.

Thank you

M
Hi there!
Well, I am not a mom, but the little girl I nanny she is 18 months old and was just weighed in at about 18.5 pounds. Very small. She isn't a big eater, she will eat maybe 3 or 4 bites of something and that is it. She started pediasure at 14 months old when she weighed just shy of 15 pounds. She was asked to see a nutritionist if she didn't take to the pediasure. But pediasure helped her a lot! She is still tiny but she's healthier and it helps when she doesn't eat much for her meals. And her last dr visit 2 weeks ago, said she no longer recommends her going to a nutritionist because she isn't terribly thin and unhealthy looking, she has some babyfat to her now, but just small. if that makes sense. But she loves Pediasure, and it's great to give her something when she isn't such a big eater.

Good luck to you. I would try the Pediasure. It's great.

But also talk with your Doctor. Maybe your daughter won't even need the pediasure. Pediasure is usually for children who don't eat well.
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#3 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 02:51 AM
 
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Without a medical problem I wouldn't. Have you read the ingredients?

It's a great thing- when needed. But it doesn't sound to me like your child needs it.

-Angela
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#4 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 02:54 AM
 
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If it makes you feel better my 4.5 yr ols weighs 33lbs when fully dressed and wet. A boy as well.
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#5 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 03:46 AM
 
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Some little kids are just small, esp. if they were BF! I was concerned when my DD fell from 90 Percentile to 30 Percentile for weight around 9-12 months, and I even asked my Pedi about Pediasure. She told me to not waste my money and that she wasnt worried at all. She also suggested high caloric foods if I having problems getting her to sit still long enough to eat.

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#6 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 11:27 AM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you. DD is not a very good eater. At her last appointment, the dr did say that she is very small and suggested I conitnue giving her whole milk. Well, dd loves her milk and would prefer to drink it more than eat a meal.
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#7 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 02:05 PM
 
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I think I would encourage more nutritious calorie dense foods (whole milk dairy products, avocado, cooking with olive oil, etc.) over Pediasure. My DD is another peanut at 22 lb, 33" and not quite 3. She is still nursing twice a day and some days eats better than others, but since she is healthy, meeting milestones and still growing, I am not concerned.

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#8 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 08:07 PM
 
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My doctor just recommended Pediasure for my little one last week, but after I looked at the label (the first 2 ingrediants are water and sugar) I decided to persue other options. Below are some suggestions from another thread for ways to bluk up.

Whole milk
Butter on veggies
Lots of cheese (he loves it and we just let him eat it whenever)
Avocado
Nut butters
Whole milk yogurts
Eggs

We are also offering food more often. Providing opportunities for extra snacks.

Good luck!

Mom to :, , and :
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#9 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 08:22 PM
 
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I would not use Pediasure. It is loaded with sugar.
Instead, make your own smoothies with added nut butters, protein powder, flax oil, etc.
Also...
Serve breads, veggies, baked chips with homemade hummus made with tahini, or guacamole.
Sandwiches with nut butter.
Hearty casseroles.
Potatoes in many forms.
Pastas with olive oil and any other toppings/lasagna/stuffed shells/etc.

Could the small build just be genetic? If many in the family are small, then there's no need to "fatten her up" to meet some crazy growth chart average.

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#10 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 09:09 PM
 
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My little one lived off it and breastmilk during her winter of illness. She had very enlarged adenoids and had trouble swallowing (I assume since she refused to eat anything solid)
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#11 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 10:23 PM
 
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Is Pediasure really that bad that you wouldn't even consider it?

I read other options of food choices instead of using the Pediasure. Well, the little one I nanny for, she won't eat. She takes maybe 3 or 4 bites of something, and she's done. If she decides to even eat the food.

So she is on pediasure which she is willing to have, and is gaining her weight through that way. As well as me and her mom trying to give her other foods, but it's hard because she just won't eat.

I know Im in the childhood forum but since the OP brought up the Pediasure topic I wanted to reply and such.

So again, is pediasure really that bad ???
Because it seems like its helping.
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#12 of 30 Old 07-04-2008, 11:47 PM
 
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I agree w/ the PP, if you are having problems w/ the high density foods due to DC being a picky eater, then having a Pediasure is not going ruin her healthy eating habits. She will not get addicted to the sugar and it will not make her into a junk-food only kid. It is important to look at genetics when deciding DC's healthy weight instead of relying on some dumb chart, but it is also nice to see full little cheeks on small children. If they are too thin when they are small, when they put on height during a growth spurt they might become dangerously thin. I'd use the Pediasure if the other methods don't work, but definitely listen to your inner-mom voice.

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#13 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 12:45 AM
 
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Originally Posted by AnessasNannyXoX View Post
Is Pediasure really that bad that you wouldn't even consider it?

I read other options of food choices instead of using the Pediasure. Well, the little one I nanny for, she won't eat. She takes maybe 3 or 4 bites of something, and she's done. If she decides to even eat the food.

So she is on pediasure which she is willing to have, and is gaining her weight through that way. As well as me and her mom trying to give her other foods, but it's hard because she just won't eat.

I know Im in the childhood forum but since the OP brought up the Pediasure topic I wanted to reply and such.

So again, is pediasure really that bad ???
Because it seems like its helping.
It can be very useful when needed for medical reasons.

I would not consider it otherwise.

-Angela
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#14 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 02:02 AM
 
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I have twins who had FFT. My son was a CHUNK below the growth chart due to oral/motor issues from low-muscle tone. My daughter was below the chart or at the 1st percentile.

I tried a litany of things. I gave them scads of fattening things, none of which they would eat. I tried Pediasure, but no one would eat it.

I had the greatest success with whole-milk kefir. They loved it, drank scads of it, and it seemed to improve their overall health and appetite.
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#15 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 10:23 AM
 
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a little will not hurt, combine it with other things
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#16 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 06:41 PM
 
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Cow's milk and sugar make my kids sick. We do smoothies at least once a day. I would try smoothies with

nut butters/ground up seeds/almonds/raw veggies
with some some yummy frozen strawberries and bananas
and some kind of liquid like juice or whatever milk you tolerate.

I would at least try the smoothies and read the ingredients before you decide.
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#17 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 07:24 PM
 
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I second everything that angela mentioned and personally, I think that the stuff they put in pediasure is not good for your child. I also don't understand the concept of fattening up a child just b/c they are small when they have no other medical issues that compromise their nutrition status. Also, those, "supplement" bars they make are pure junk. I was given some of those for my son by a relative who is a ped, it was so sickening sweet, I felt it was inedible. Both my DH and I were very disgusted that a product made as a, "nutrition supplement" was basically just a big block of sugar.

If you think your kid is small, well, I have one who is smaller. He is 4.5 yrs old and 27 lbs. He eats a very healthy diet, is developmentally on track and a happy kid. I got a LOT of pressure ever since he was a baby to supplement or switch to formula, b/c family members thought something must be, "wrong" with my milk, that I had such a small child. When it was time to start solids, everyone was giddy with excitement that he would fatten up. Nope. To everyone's disappointment, he was still small. Genetically speaking both DH's and my side of the family have small, scrawny kids, so really I don't understand why both sides of the family were so concerned with how small my children are. I'm at the point where I am not worried. However, I can empathize with the constant worry. I worry a lot, but in the end I keep reminding myself that SOMEONE has to make up the bottom part of the growth chart, and that someone is my 4.5 yr old. The good thing about having a small kid is that I am more liberal with treats like ice cream. Also, is your son very active? That could be why he is skinnier too. I see kids who are overwt and I guess I feel that I'd rather deal with having a child who is on the scrawny side than a child who is overwt and sedentary. BTW, in the long run it isn't really going to matter. My brothers and I were literally the smallest, runtiest, kids at school all the way up until high school, now we are avg ht and normal to a little bit overwt. You would never have guessed that we were scrawny kids.
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#18 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 07:47 PM
 
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Let's get one thing straight...there is a risk for nutritional deficiencies if a kid is not getting enough calories and vitamins/minerals from ANY source BUT there is no risk in adding extra carbs/fat to their diet, especially if they are active. We don't live in a 3rd world country striken w/ famine, so we don't have to play Russian Roulette w/ chance just because we don't want to add a couple pounds of fat to our kids.

I get so sick of adults who have eating problems or who are FAT THEMSELVES and are trying to starve their children because they think they are saving them a future of obesity. It's a fine line, but I'd rather push the child to gain a little weight and have a preschooler who was somewhere in the middle of the growth chart than pretend like seeing all of my childrens ribs is healthy and he's just fine.

There, I said it.
Rant over.

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#19 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 10:51 PM
 
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I would try homemade smoothies and the like like PP suggested before using something so sugar-laden and full of chemicals like pediasure. But I think it is really important to ascertain if this is the normal growth pattern of a healthy, genetically small child, or a child that is having failure to thrive issues. Giving a child pediasure is not going to make them taller than they are genetically programmed to be, so if your child is naturally short, its better to just accept it (I know whereof I speak as I am under 5 feet tall and have petite kids as well). I can, however, see how it could be important for a child in danger who needed to gain weight for their health and who wouldn't ingest much of anything else.

So determining whether there is a health risk would be my first course of action. If there was a health risk, then I would try calorie/nutrient dense healthy foods, then something like pediasure as a last resort.

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#20 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 11:17 PM
 
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If you are concerned about your child's weight you might want to consider talking to your doctor about getting a referral to a pediatric nutritionist. My son has one for some weight-related issues he had developed and she really has been a godsend in terms of just easing my concerns and keeping me updated with good information as to what, as his age progresses, constitutes good caloric intake and even sometimes simply just meal ideas to try him on. A good nutritionist would also better be able to evaluate if your child is really in need of supplimentation to his diet or if other options (or just leaving it alone) might be better in your specific case.
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#21 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 11:30 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ShwarmaQueen View Post
Let's get one thing straight...there is a risk for nutritional deficiencies if a kid is not getting enough calories and vitamins/minerals from ANY source BUT there is no risk in adding extra carbs/fat to their diet, especially if they are active. We don't live in a 3rd world country striken w/ famine, so we don't have to play Russian Roulette w/ chance just because we don't want to add a couple pounds of fat to our kids.

I get so sick of adults who have eating problems or who are FAT THEMSELVES and are trying to starve their children because they think they are saving them a future of obesity. It's a fine line, but I'd rather push the child to gain a little weight and have a preschooler who was somewhere in the middle of the growth chart than pretend like seeing all of my childrens ribs is healthy and he's just fine.

There, I said it.
Rant over.
I don't see anyone saying it's a bad idea to add extra calories or nutrition to a child's diet. The only argument being made here is that if you're going to do so, do so with nutritionally significant foods, not sugar.

-Angela
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#22 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 11:33 PM
 
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Originally Posted by ShwarmaQueen View Post
Let's get one thing straight...there is a risk for nutritional deficiencies if a kid is not getting enough calories and vitamins/minerals from ANY source BUT there is no risk in adding extra carbs/fat to their diet, especially if they are active. We don't live in a 3rd world country striken w/ famine, so we don't have to play Russian Roulette w/ chance just because we don't want to add a couple pounds of fat to our kids.

I get so sick of adults who have eating problems or who are FAT THEMSELVES and are trying to starve their children because they think they are saving them a future of obesity. It's a fine line, but I'd rather push the child to gain a little weight and have a preschooler who was somewhere in the middle of the growth chart than pretend like seeing all of my childrens ribs is healthy and he's just fine.

There, I said it.
Rant over.
Well... My DS is way, way, below "the curve" @ ~23 pounds, 31in @ 3 years, 2 months old. His ped diagnosed him with FTT and prescribed pediasure. We tried it for a short period, it just made him projectile vomit everywhere (and he has had NO other issues like this with real food). So we stopped giving it to him.

And then I realized. Sure, he's thin - far from what you would call chubby and he never really got that characteristic "toddler tummy". But he has full cheeks, glossy blonde hair down to his waist, bright eyes, sleeps well, wets plenty of diapers, poops regularly, and knows his ABC's and 123's. Oh, and no, you can't see his ribs!

So, anyway, I said all that just to say - just because someone with a PhD says that your child is too short, or too skinny, or not eating enough based on some chart that represents OTHER children (WTF do other children have to do with ONE particular child??), does not mean that there is something wrong. Mommy instict trumps a degree, any day.

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#23 of 30 Old 07-05-2008, 11:40 PM
 
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Mommy instict trumps a degree, any day.
I totally agree.

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My four year old weighs in at 26 pounds. She's had all the testing and bloodwork done and all "they" found out was that she's a small kid. That said, I wouldn't feed her Pediasure just to try to make her fatter. It's just not healthy.

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#25 of 30 Old 07-06-2008, 02:39 AM
 
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Originally Posted by ShwarmaQueen View Post
Let's get one thing straight...there is a risk for nutritional deficiencies if a kid is not getting enough calories and vitamins/minerals from ANY source BUT there is no risk in adding extra carbs/fat to their diet, especially if they are active. We don't live in a 3rd world country striken w/ famine, so we don't have to play Russian Roulette w/ chance just because we don't want to add a couple pounds of fat to our kids.

I get so sick of adults who have eating problems or who are FAT THEMSELVES and are trying to starve their children because they think they are saving them a future of obesity. It's a fine line, but I'd rather push the child to gain a little weight and have a preschooler who was somewhere in the middle of the growth chart than pretend like seeing all of my childrens ribs is healthy and he's just fine.

There, I said it.
Rant over.
??? Did anyone say that they were starving their children on purpose so they wouldn't be fat? I don't think that you understand. For some kids, you cannot push them to gain weight. My child is one of those kids. If I gave him a ton of junk food, yeah he would gain wt, BUT I don't consider that a nutritious way to gain weight. I offer him nutritious food, BUT I will not force food down his mouth, just so he can miraculously be in the 50%ile. Why does a child have to be in the middle of a growth chart anyway? A growth chart represents kids in a large range, not all kids are going to be in the upper half of the growth chart. Like I've said before, someone's got to make up the bottom part of the growth chart, and those of us who have really small sized kids have the ones that make up the bottom of that growth chart. Just b/c a child is at the bottom of the growth chart, it does not automatically mean that they are malnourished or something is wrong with them!
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#26 of 30 Old 07-06-2008, 02:34 PM
 
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My point is that I would not be overly picky about what I'm giving my child if I felt like they needed the extra calories and they liked whatever it was that I was giving them. Whether it be a PB&J, cream-smoothie, or Pediasure, if the kid likes it and it's nutritious, I'd just then let them have it and quit obsessing over if there's refined sugar in it. :

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#27 of 30 Old 07-06-2008, 03:47 PM
 
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If it makes you feel better my 4.5 yr ols weighs 33lbs when fully dressed and wet. A boy as well.
If it makes you feel better, my 7 yo weighs 44 lbs soaking wet.

He's healthy, though, and eats well. That's all I care about.

My 4yo is also 44 lbs soaking wet. And much shorter (so far) than his brother. It's all about the genetics.

Take it easy, Mama. Your little one is the right size!


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#28 of 30 Old 07-06-2008, 05:03 PM
 
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My point is that I would not be overly picky about what I'm giving my child if I felt like they needed the extra calories and they liked whatever it was that I was giving them. Whether it be a PB&J, cream-smoothie, or Pediasure, if the kid likes it and it's nutritious, I'd just then let them have it and quit obsessing over if there's refined sugar in it. :
The debate is whether pediasure is "nutritious" or not.

I would say it's questionable.

-Angela
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#29 of 30 Old 07-07-2008, 12:42 AM
 
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It's a fine line, but I'd rather push the child to gain a little weight and have a preschooler who was somewhere in the middle of the growth chart than pretend like seeing all of my childrens ribs is healthy and he's just fine.

My preschooler is not in the middle of the growth chart. He's at the very low end. Yes, I can see his ribs. I do not pretend that he's just fine. He *is* just fine.



Quote:
Originally Posted by alegna View Post
I don't see anyone saying it's a bad idea to add extra calories or nutrition to a child's diet. The only argument being made here is that if you're going to do so, do so with nutritionally significant foods, not sugar.

-Angela
Exactly. Many would argue that refined sugars are not what could be called nutritious especially if the child will eat/drink other higher quality foods.

As posted Pediasure has it's place, but I don't see grabbing for it just to fatten up an otherwise healthy kid.



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If it makes you feel better, my 7 yo weighs 44 lbs soaking wet.

He's healthy, though, and eats well. That's all I care about.
Mine too! 7yr old is 44lbs, 4 yr old is 33lbs, and when I'm not pg I'm around 96ish lbs. I'm gonna go with "we are just small people" and that we are all healthy.
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#30 of 30 Old 07-07-2008, 01:34 AM
 
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My dd 8 years old, 43 pounds, 46" tall, is in the 3rd percentile for both height and weight. It's just how she's made, she's always been small. What's odd is that she takes after me (her 5'10" tall mama) and has really long legs for such a small body. Dd is really active and usually found running around in our yard.

Her favorite breakfast is a banana smoothie. I put a individual sized yogurt and a banana in the freezer the night before, in the morning I blend it together with just a touch of milk.

I would use pediasure only as a last ditch effort. I'm sure you can come up with your own recipe that's much better for a growing body, tastes good, and WAY more affordable.

-Janna, independent mother of dd, Ms. Mattie Sky born on my 25th birthday, 06*23*2000. My Mama Feb.21,1938-Sept.10,2006
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