ISO definitions: turned/topstitched, serged, bound edges - Mothering Forums

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Old 06-25-2003, 11:06 AM - Thread Starter
 
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A question for you sewing and/or knowledgeable mamas about diaper construction: [edited to add, and by "diapers" here, I'm specifically refering to AIO's. I know there are similar differences for fitted diapers, but I'm not sure if they are exactly the same]

I can see the differences by looking at pictures of 1) serged diapers (e.g. Little Lambs); 2) diapers with bound edges (e.g. Full Moon Baby Gear) and turned and topstitched diapers (e.g. one of Heavenly Hineys' versions), but I don't understand how these different styles are made.

Can someone explain how any or all of these are made, and do you have any opinions about the pros and cons of each style?

Karla
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Old 06-25-2003, 11:20 AM
 
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Here's my stab at it:

A serged edge is made with a serger (duh!), a special kind of sewing machine that uses four threads to make a very sturdy overcast stitch. A serger actually trims the edge of the fabric and then sews over the trimmed edge. With a serged diaper or cover, you're always going to get the "ruffle" effect from the elastic, which might be a pro or a con depending on your point of view.

A bound diaper is made my applying a separate piece of fabric, the binding, around the edge of the diaper. In the case of AIO's, the binding is usually fold-over elastic. In theory, a bound edge would be more secure/less likely to fray than a serged edge, but I've never had any problems with my serged covers. Also, you have a softer edge with binding, and no ruffle effece.

A turned and topstiched diaper is made by sewing the diaper with the right sides together (leaving an opening), and then turned right side out. The diaper is then topstitched, meaning that a seam is sewn right along the edge. Turning and topstitching makes for a nice clean edge without ruffles but it is definitely more labor intensive than serging. I'm not familiar with HH's, but generally PUL AIO's and covers are not make by T & T because of all the holes that are created by all the stitching, and the wicking that results. HoneyBoys are also turned and topstitched.

HTH!
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Old 06-25-2003, 11:29 AM
 
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Amber at Darling Diapers was so kind to explain this to me


"Turned is like what your happy hiney¡¦s pocket AIO is.. so that it was sewn inside out and then they ¡§turned¡¨ it right side out.. that¡¦s how Darling AIO¡¦s are done also. Topstitching is when after the diaper is turned, they stitch around the edges..(usually this goes around the elastic so that the elastic has what they call a ¡§casing¡¨). I don¡¦t topstitch mine because this puts more holes in the laminated fabric and causes wicking/leaking right there. Serged is like a darling fitted so you know what that is. The only other option is ¡§bound¡¨.. which simply means that there is something covering the edges .. like foldover elastic. Sometimes people bind AIO¡¦s with fleece, like the baby softwraps AIO.. or wool like the elbee wool covers. Or lycra is used sometimes."

HTH
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Old 06-25-2003, 03:06 PM - Thread Starter
 
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Thank you Pinky and Kate!
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Old 06-25-2003, 05:41 PM
 
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So I have a question. If I don't have a serger or a binding foot and I wanted to sew diapers, the best thing for me is sew it turned? Top stiching is not nessasary? If I was using this method, from diapersewing how would I do the elastic? Would I do the elastic and the soaker first and then turn it inside out to finish?
I'm new at sewing (a few months) and new at cding (two months), so sorry if those are stupid questions. And TIA for your answers! Edited because although I am new to sewing and Cding I am not new to READING! Duh!Diapersewing explains how the turning works pretty thoughroly (sp?) but I think it didn't fully *click* until I reread it after posting to this thread!

-BelovedBird

Mom of 5 boys- 13, 10, 8, 2 : and newbie Aug. 24th, '09 . babywearing advocate . Cook, baker, homemaker, wife to a man with another woman's kidney (live altruistic, unknown donor).
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Old 06-25-2003, 06:19 PM
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Quote:
Originally posted by BelovedBird
Edited because although I am new to sewing and Cding I am not new to READING! Duh!Diapersewing explains how the turning works pretty thoughroly (sp?) but I think it didn't fully *click* until I reread it after posting to this thread!

-BelovedBird
So you got it figured out, yes?
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Old 06-25-2003, 06:21 PM
 
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If you don't have a serger, you definitely want to turn your diapers...this is much easier than binding, IMO.

I found that the easiest way to make turned fitted was the way described in the HoneyBoy pattern...it's a little less direct, but has worked well for me. Basically you make a pattern based on your stitching line (i.e don't leave a seam allowance) and then trace the pattern onto the fabric of an inner layer or the wrong side of your diaper inner. Then sew down your soaker down to this layer. And then you stack your diaper layers together and pin them, and stitch along your traced line. Does this make sense? After stitching along the seam line (leaving an opening for turning) you sew the elastic outside your outline, putting it in the seam allowance. You then trim the edges and turn, and then I topstitched. You wouldn't need to topstich from a functional point of view (except to close the opening), but it does make it tidier looking. If you do topstich, make sure that you go around the elastic instead of sewing through it.

I hope this makes some sense. I made three dozen flannel fitteds this way--I found the HB-Home pattern to be worth the $$ because of the detailed instructions--they are much better than this brief summary!!

Enjoy your diaper sewing, and these are not dumb questions! It takes awhile to get the hang of diaper construction but once you get it it's pretty easy, I think! Please keep posting your questions, there are lots of mamas on this board that make our own diaperes!
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